ss conversion...

Discussion in 'Singlespeed' started by mattmor, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. mattmor

    mattmor New Member

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    Hi,

    I have a 7sp rear and double chainring on a Pinarello cyclocross. I'm considering converting this to either singlespeed or fixed gear. Could you guys please point me in the right direction. Any advise would be great. Thanks in advance.

    Matt
     
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  2. Phycotim

    Phycotim New Member

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    go to www.forge-mtb.co.uk

    Total Singlespeed Set

    Singlespeed Sleeves, Shimano DMX Sprocket (16 or 18 teeth) and the Singlefinger (Freeride or Roll-on. £33.15 really cheep really strong
     
  3. bikepirate

    bikepirate New Member

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    does your frame have somewhat horizontal dropouts? if not, you are probably going to have to use a chain tensioner, so it would have to be a singlespeed and not fixed.

    a good resource for conversions is http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed/index.html. there's a bunch of articles on the topic and they are all very helpful. good luck!
     
  4. tcklyde

    tcklyde New Member

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    Also, if your in an urban area, consider heading out to your LBS or checking resources like Craigslist.com for someone who does singlespeed,/fixed gear conversions. With fixies now being the ultimate cool hipster ride, it's pretty easy to find people who do a conversion for cheap or even trade for parts.

    I don't recommend converting to a fixed gear on your own if you don't have quite a bit of experience in bike mechanics. You definitely don't want to be messing with a freehub conversion.
     
  5. bikepirate

    bikepirate New Member

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    i don't see why there would be any problems doing this yourself. personally, i think the best thing to do would be to get a new rear hub and have a new wheel built around it. that way you can still have the old one if you want to switch back at some point.
     
  6. tcklyde

    tcklyde New Member

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    Well, yes, there's no reason you couldn't by a new track hub and then have the LBS build up a wheel. Then sticking it on the bike isn't too tough.

    My point is that it's a little bit more difficult to convert an old hub and redish the wheel if you don't have experience in bike mechanics. In that case, it may be better and safer to have a pro do it.
     
  7. Guzzi Rider

    Guzzi Rider New Member

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    Having just built a single speed roadbike I can say this:
    Looking at the Sheldon Brown link (previously listed in this thread) was/is VERY helpful. Using an older frame that originaly used a freewheel hub is a good idea because they have horizontal drop outs not verticle drop outs and thus allow for chain adjustments. Verticle dropouts are useable though with either a chain tensioner or a specific set of cogs allowing for a presice chain length.
    You will need to re-dish any wheel that once had a bigger cluster and this will most often mean replacing the short spokes (driveside)
    I am running a 16 tooth freewheel with 2 cogs up front a 42 and a 38 I have enough chain to change sprockets up front ( I haven't had to yet) and I have the wheel dished so that I can split the difference between the front 2 cogs.
    hope this info helps.....

    Jeremy
     
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