St Croix Half-Ironman - cycling segment

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jet, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. Jet

    Jet Guest

    I'm surprised with all the talk of spinning on the uphills at 80-90 cadence
    to see the pros doing a 30-40-50 cadence up the hills in this race. It's a
    7/10ths of a mile climb, at 14% with sections of 18%, which isn't that long
    of a hill. Though I'd expect the pros to drop down to maybe 70rpm cadence,
    it's surprising to see them struggling to even get the pedals around. Seems
    to me they made a mistake in their gearing choices or something. ;-)

    Here's a link:

    http://www.villadawn.com/st_croix/info/st_croix_triathlon.htm

    -jet
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    Jet<[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm surprised with all the talk of spinning on the uphills at 80-90 cadence
    > to see the pros doing a 30-40-50 cadence up the hills in this race. It's a
    > 7/10ths of a mile climb, at 14% with sections of 18%, which isn't that long
    > of a hill. Though I'd expect the pros to drop down to maybe 70rpm cadence,
    > it's surprising to see them struggling to even get the pedals around. Seems
    > to me they made a mistake in their gearing choices or something. ;-)
    >
    > Here's a link:
    >
    > http://www.villadawn.com/st_croix/info/st_croix_triathlon.htm


    I always get the impression that in a triathlon the best
    runner always wins; never the best swimmer or best
    cyclist.

    --
    Michael Press
     
  3. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Jet<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm surprised with all the talk of spinning on the uphills at 80-90
    >> cadence
    >> to see the pros doing a 30-40-50 cadence up the hills in this race. It's
    >> a
    >> 7/10ths of a mile climb, at 14% with sections of 18%, which isn't that
    >> long
    >> of a hill. Though I'd expect the pros to drop down to maybe 70rpm
    >> cadence,
    >> it's surprising to see them struggling to even get the pedals around.
    >> Seems
    >> to me they made a mistake in their gearing choices or something. ;-)
    >>
    >> Here's a link:
    >>
    >> http://www.villadawn.com/st_croix/info/st_croix_triathlon.htm

    >
    > I always get the impression that in a triathlon the best
    > runner always wins; never the best swimmer or best
    > cyclist.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Press


    I got the impression from watching that program that the idea of a "best
    cyclist" in a triathlon is like an oxymoron. Don't get me wrong. I know
    some of those guys are fast as hell and could beat my ass like a drum. But
    the cycling mechanics of most of those guys are just awful. And about the
    worst one was the guy who came off the bike leg in first place. It's like
    all these guys could be a good bit faster if they'd learn how to ride. (I
    know all about the differences between regular bikes, tri bikes and TT
    bikes. I know the tri guys look a bit different. But I thought the idea
    was that they were supposed to be pitched forward a bit more to stretch
    their hamstrings to help them on the run. Nearly all the guys on that
    program today had their saddles too low and weren't getting any extension at
    all. And some of them, despite aerobars, were sitting up like tourists.)
    --
    Bob C.

    "Of course it hurts. The trick is not minding that it hurts."
    T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia)
     
  4. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Michael Press wrote:
    > I always get the impression that in a triathlon the best
    > runner always wins; never the best swimmer or best
    > cyclist.


    That's cuz they always do the running segment last, the pussies. If they
    did the swimming leg last and they outlawed rescues, not only would your
    impression be different but there'd be fewer damn triathlons.
     
  5. Michael Press wrote:
    > I always get the impression that in a triathlon the best
    > runner always wins; never the best swimmer or best
    > cyclist.


    That came about with legalized drafting (peloton riding).

    --
    E. Dronkert
     
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