Stair/uphill running as training



cty

New Member
Jul 8, 2003
6
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0
Hi!

I've been an amateur cyclist since years (and a runner before that), and recently discovered the stair/uphill running as a training for LT/Vo2max.

I've got a small hill nearby to my home, which allows me to stair run about 3-4 minutes (420 stairs :), or run uphill for 10 minutes. Talking about lt/vo2max training, these times represent very high intensity, of course.

I used to do intervals on the bike, but i always felt hard to bring up the heart rate to the desired level; but on stairs, it's much easier for me to increase that. In numbers: using the "220-age" formula, my mhr is around 193 (acutally, i never reached it: my physical maximum was 189-190). On the bike, it's very hard to go over 178, but on the stairs, i can reach that in 40 seconds, and on the top of the hill, it's usually over 185.

And, i know that when one's tired one must not do any high intensity training, but there are some cases when we must do that. Did you hear about the tabata-intervals? (Look for it in a search engine if not. You'll find a lot of infos about this method.) Those intervals must be done five times a week, so it's not always possible to rest properly between them. LT-training means that one must "feel" the building up of the lactate in the muscles, this can be achieved only with pain. (no pain, no gain, eh? :)
So, when i have to do these tabatas on the bike and i'm not perfectly fit, then it's almost impossible to go over 175 - therefore it's pointless to do the intervals because no serious lactate will build up; but on the stairs, i can reach a 180+ hr whem i'm tired too.

So, my questions about the subject are:

1) Can the easier hr-increase be from that i was a runner? In the past few years i only did cycling, so my muscles aren't trained for stair-running; still i can do better on the stairs. Why?

2) I believe it's good for the lt/vo2max. (Is it? :) The researchers did the tabata protocol on a stationary bike, it was easier to measure the results i think. If someone's a bike racer, then it's no question that it's good for him. But i'm not sure that when i'm on a bike i can use the good results of this type of stair-training.

3) Cycling is relatively a "smooth" movement. Is it more demanding for the body to run up the stairs? I mean, can i seriously damage my knees, etc. when doing that?

Thank you for your answers; and, any other opinions are welcome!
 

cty

New Member
Jul 8, 2003
6
0
0
And, another question, regarding the power: are the short stair- intervals helpful in developing a strong quadriceps for cycling? Or their shortness are not enough to strengthen the quads (and therefore i must use another method to do that.)?

Thankx!
 

stowerider

New Member
Sep 23, 2003
25
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0
Originally posted by cty
Hi!

I've been an amateur cyclist since years (and a runner before that), and recently discovered the stair/uphill running as a training for LT/Vo2max.

I've got a small hill nearby to my home, which allows me to stair run about 3-4 minutes (420 stairs :), or run uphill for 10 minutes. Talking about lt/vo2max training, these times represent very high intensity, of course.

I used to do intervals on the bike, but i always felt hard to bring up the heart rate to the desired level; but on stairs, it's much easier for me to increase that. In numbers: using the "220-age" formula, my mhr is around 193 (acutally, i never reached it: my physical maximum was 189-190). On the bike, it's very hard to go over 178, but on the stairs, i can reach that in 40 seconds, and on the top of the hill, it's usually over 185.

And, i know that when one's tired one must not do any high intensity training, but there are some cases when we must do that. Did you hear about the tabata-intervals? (Look for it in a search engine if not. You'll find a lot of infos about this method.) Those intervals must be done five times a week, so it's not always possible to rest properly between them. LT-training means that one must "feel" the building up of the lactate in the muscles, this can be achieved only with pain. (no pain, no gain, eh? :)
So, when i have to do these tabatas on the bike and i'm not perfectly fit, then it's almost impossible to go over 175 - therefore it's pointless to do the intervals because no serious lactate will build up; but on the stairs, i can reach a 180+ hr whem i'm tired too.

So, my questions about the subject are:

1) Can the easier hr-increase be from that i was a runner? In the past few years i only did cycling, so my muscles aren't trained for stair-running; still i can do better on the stairs. Why?

2) I believe it's good for the lt/vo2max. (Is it? :) The researchers did the tabata protocol on a stationary bike, it was easier to measure the results i think. If someone's a bike racer, then it's no question that it's good for him. But i'm not sure that when i'm on a bike i can use the good results of this type of stair-training.

3) Cycling is relatively a "smooth" movement. Is it more demanding for the body to run up the stairs? I mean, can i seriously damage my knees, etc. when doing that?

Thank you for your answers; and, any other opinions are welcome!

Hi,

In answer to question 1, the reason why its easier to hit a higher HR running than biking is because when you run you have to support your whole body mass; whereas when you are cycling, your body is supported on the saddle. This means that your heart has to work harder when running than cycling. Typically an athlete's max HR for running will be a few beats higher than for cycling.

SR
 

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