Stand-up-and-Pedal-Recumbent



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Lb

Guest
Has anyone ever tried to engineer a recumbent that you could somehow stand up and pedal for hill
climbing? Can it be done? That would be the perfect hybrid right? Comfort on the flats; power on the
hills. LBJ [email protected]
 
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Jude T. McGloin

Guest
Yes

George Reynolds...Reynolds Weld Labs

Prototype/Expermental Only

Model name: Redundant

--
Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
Inc 1-800-586-6645 "LB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Has anyone ever tried to engineer a recumbent that you could somehow stand up and pedal for hill
> climbing? Can it be done? That would be the perfect hybrid right? Comfort on the flats; power on
> the hills. LBJ [email protected]
 
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Tom Blum

Guest
Search "Joe Kochanowski" . He has done it. It's homebuilt, but there is a video clip of him
transfering from one method to the other.

--
Miles of Smiles,

Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone

www.gate.net/~teblum
 
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Jkeenan

Guest
Check out a video called "Wind In My Soul" which you can find at Northeast Recumbents. It was made
by a member of the MARS club and in it there is a "convertible" made by someone in Europe. Looked
like it worked remarkably well.

joe 'recumbo' keenan "LB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Has anyone ever tried to engineer a recumbent that you could somehow stand up and pedal for hill
> climbing? Can it be done? That would be the perfect hybrid right? Comfort on the flats; power on
> the hills. LBJ [email protected]
 
G

Gabriele Betti

Guest
..Maybe , something like a seat-pedal system rotating around an axis..?

"LB" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:[email protected]...
> Has anyone ever tried to engineer a recumbent that you could somehow stand up and pedal for hill
> climbing? Can it be done? That would be the perfect hybrid right? Comfort on the flats; power on
> the hills. LBJ [email protected]
 
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Dean Arthur

Guest
Let's see - 25 psi on upright pedals when seated; 1/2 body weight when standing versus approx 2.2
times body weight when seated with back against seatback. Yup I guess upright and standing is more
powerful, right?
 
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Lb

Guest
Yup I guess upright and standing is more powerful,
> right?
Yup, that's right.
 
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Jon Meinecke

Guest
A previous poster wrote:
>>Yup I guess upright and standing is more powerful, right?

LB wrote:
>Yup, that's right.

Define powerful.

In terms of 'leg press strength' it seems recumbent bikes with rigid seats would have an advantage
over upright bikes... In terms of why uprights may be better for going up hill, 'leg press strength'
probably isn't the only factor.

This is a recurring thread.

Google "Riding and climbing tests" for some interesting discussion.

Jon Meinecke
 
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Dean Arthur

Guest
"Tongue-In-Cheek" - upright and standing more powerful than 'bent with back against seatback. Right?
 
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Lb

Guest
> "Tongue-In-Cheek" - upright and standing more powerful than 'bent with back against
> seatback. Right?
Dean, I think that you are forgetting to take into consideration the fact that when standing one can
pull up on the handlebars thus exerting the same downwards force on the pedal. Right?
 
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Dean Arthur

Guest
Ahhh,but does standing and pulling on handlebars anywhere equate to power available to pedals from
back against rest?
 
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Tom Sherman

Guest
Dean Arthur wrote:
>
> Ahhh,but does standing and pulling on handlebars anywhere equate to power available to pedals from
> back against rest?

This has been discussed before at considerable length on a.r.b.r. I contend from the available
evidence [1] the advantage to standing is not in increased power generation, but in bringing
different muscles into play during climbing. Therefore, aerobic capacity will be the limiting factor
in climbing performance, not muscle fatigue. Recumbent riders'
[2] are limited to one position, so muscle fatigue may occur before aerobic capacity is exhausted.

[3] A study (done by UT-Austin IIRC) found that the fasting way to climb on an upright bike was to
alternate standing and sitting, followed by staying seated, and in last place, standing the
entire climb.
[4] Except for those very few with on-the-fly adjustable seat recline.

Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side) RANS "Wavewind" and Rocket, Earth Cycles Sunset and
Dragonflyer
 
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Lb

Guest
Therefore, aerobic capacity will be the limiting
> factor in climbing performance, not muscle fatigue. Recumbent riders'
> [2] are limited to one position, so muscle fatigue may occur before aerobic capacity is exhausted.
>
> [1] A study (done by UT-Austin IIRC) found that the fasting way to climb on an upright bike was to
> alternate standing and sitting, followed by staying seated, and in last place, standing the
> entire climb.
> [2] Except for those very few with on-the-fly adjustable seat recline.
>
> Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side) RANS "Wavewind" and Rocket, Earth Cycles Sunset and
> Dragonflyer

Perhaps we could contact Lance Armstrong and ask him how he does it? LBJ [email protected]
 
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Joseph Kochanow

Guest
[email protected] (Jeff Wills) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> "Tom Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> > Search "Joe Kochanowski" . He has done it. It's homebuilt, but there is a video clip of him
> > transfering from one method to the other.
>
> Here you go: http://www.outsideconnection.com/gallant/hpv/joe/
>
> Jeff

My final conclusion about my "transformer" bike is that it would be my bike of choice if I had to
live in a poor third world country with bad roads. I have found my bike design was the most
practical design for conditions like those in Africa or similar places where the roads are bad and
unsuitable for multi-track vehicles. My design would carry a larger and heavier cargo load than a
regular bike. It also works as a poor mans tandem. I wish someone would develop the "transformer"
design for what it is really capable of accomplishing. Where I live now in Seattle WA, the roads are
excellent and I do not need off road capability. I need a bike that has good speed,acceleration and
crash protection. The various bent designs I am working on now work so well that I never ride
regular bikes for any serious distance. The idea of a transformer bike is not limited to something
that is regular and bent. I want a trike that converts to a bike on the fly. I have a bent that also
works like a scooter. My favorite design right now looks similar to the original Velocar but it can
be made either FWD or RWD with some parts switching.
 
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