Standing Rib Roast - panic now, or panic later?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Glitter Ninja, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it. Also, about how
    many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is
    preferable I don't mind leftovers.

    Stacia
    the perpetual newbie
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon 19 Dec 2005 07:22:34p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Glitter
    Ninja?

    > I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    > never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    > sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    > how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it. Also, about how
    > many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is
    > preferable I don't mind leftovers.


    I usually buy a 3-rib roast for the two of us, and there are leftovers. I
    don't think a smaller roast cooks as well.

    I can't advise you on cooking it for medium-rare. We like it more done than
    that.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  3. On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:22:34 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Glitter
    Ninja) wrote:

    > I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    >never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    >sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    >how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it.


    First, do you have a GOOD meat thermometer?

    If not, buy one ASAP.

    You can coat the roast with herbs of your choice,
    or just salt and pepper, OR just leave it bare
    (I usually just use some season salt),
    then cook to an internal temp of 145-150 degrees.

    Actual cooking temp can be anything from 250 to 350,
    your choice.

    I usually cook at 275 until internal temp hits 120-125,
    then up it to 350.

    > Also, about how many pounds should I get for two people?


    'Normal' people, or meat lover? And do you want left-overs??

    >If cooking a larger roast is preferable I don't mind leftovers.


    It's hard to find a standing rib roast of less than 3-4 pounds,
    and that's a good size for 2 people for 2 meals each, plus a bit.





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  4. Never anonymous Bud <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:22:34 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Glitter
    > Ninja) wrote:
    >
    >> I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    >>never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    >>sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    >>how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it.

    >
    > First, do you have a GOOD meat thermometer?
    >
    > If not, buy one ASAP.
    >
    > You can coat the roast with herbs of your choice,
    > or just salt and pepper, OR just leave it bare
    > (I usually just use some season salt),
    > then cook to an internal temp of 145-150 degrees.
    >
    > Actual cooking temp can be anything from 250 to 350,
    > your choice.
    >
    > I usually cook at 275 until internal temp hits 120-125,
    > then up it to 350.
    >
    >> Also, about how many pounds should I get for two people?

    >
    > 'Normal' people, or meat lover? And do you want left-overs??
    >
    >>If cooking a larger roast is preferable I don't mind leftovers.

    >
    > It's hard to find a standing rib roast of less than 3-4 pounds,
    > and that's a good size for 2 people for 2 meals each, plus a bit.
    >


    This advice was pretty decent. However, we need to know how big of a roast
    you are planning.

    Michael

    --
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    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
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  5. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:36:44 GMT, Never anonymous Bud
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >then cook to an internal temp of 145-150 degrees.


    Ouch. Stop it at 130-132 for med rare. 135 tops.

    -sw
     
  6. On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:22:34 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Glitter
    Ninja) rummaged among random neurons and opined:

    > I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    >never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    >sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    >how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it. Also, about how
    >many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is
    >preferable I don't mind leftovers.


    Easiest thing in the world. James Beard's recipe has never failed:

    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Prime Rib Roast

    meats and poultry

    5 rib roast beef

    Preheat the oven to 450°F. Roast 30 mins. Reduce the heat to 325°F and
    continue to roast, allowing about 12 mins. per pound for rare (meat
    thermometer should read 120 to 125°F) or 14 to 15 mins. per pound for
    medium rare (meat thermometer should read 140°F). Allow it to stand 10
    mins before carving.

    Contributor: James Beard's American Cookery

    A five rib roast should feed about 10 - 12.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Glitter Ninja wrote:
    > I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    > never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    > sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    > how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it. Also, about how
    > many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is
    > preferable I don't mind leftovers.


    I don't think it pays for a roast less than five pounds. For two
    people have the butcher slice two 1 1/4" thick - 20 ounce bone-in rib
    steaks. Grill them. If you don't own a grill then use your stove's
    broiler. I think a thick rib steak seared all around is much tastier
    than bland center slices from a rib roast. And it's far easier to
    control the level of doneness with a steak than a roast, especially a
    small roast... will also require far less time... those two steaks
    shouldn't take more than 12 minutes to perfect med-rare. Season
    generously with freshly ground black pepper and sprinkle with a modicum
    of quality celery salt (Penzeys celery salt is excellent), no
    fercocktah garlic slivers, not unless you've been previously diagnosed
    with Chronic Taste In Ass Disease. Why any normal brained person takes
    the most mild flavored cut of beef there is and ruins it with garlic is
    unfathomable, unless of course they have CTIAD... may as well slather
    it with ketchup too while yer at it.

    Serve your steaks heaped with a generous quantity of sauted mushrooms,
    sauted in *buddah* of course. Get ya some chef's grade baked spuds to
    go with... don't ferget the real sour cream. And ya gots to have a big
    jug of dago red. Forget the rest of your menu.

    Treat yerself to some fine quality steak knives, no stupid
    serrations... poor quality knives will lower USDA Prime by at least two
    grades. If you have a friend into woodworking have them make you a set
    of beeswaxed beechwood or sycamore trenchers... eating fine beef from
    ceramic dishes is a shame.

    http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/pdf/plate_history.pdf

    Sheldon Bloodgood
     
  8. Van

    Van Guest

    "Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:36:44 GMT, Never anonymous Bud
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>then cook to an internal temp of 145-150 degrees.

    >
    > Ouch. Stop it at 130-132 for med rare. 135 tops.
    >
    > -sw


    I pull mine out at 120 tops.

    ALSO - no one has mentioned this: I start by letting the roast come to ROOM
    TEMPERATURE, then slow roasting at 300 degrees until meat hits 120. Pull
    out & let rest for 2 minutes or so.Mmmmmm!

    van
     
  9. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Glitter Ninja" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    > never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    > sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    > how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it. Also, about how
    > many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is
    > preferable I don't mind leftovers.
    >
    > Stacia
    > the perpetual newbie



    The BEST insurance is be sure to:

    1. Purchase at the very least USDA CHOICE beef
    2. Use a meat thermometer and remove from the oven @ 130 to 135 degrees
    3. Do not over-cook
    4. Let the beef rest for at least 15 minutes before beginning to carve.


    Dimitri
     
  10. On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:36:44 GMT, Never anonymous Bud
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >First, do you have a GOOD meat thermometer?
    >
    >If not, buy one ASAP.


    Get a digital probe thermometer..one where you can set the temp that
    you want the meat to be.... Perfect every time!!!!

    Christine, who has her rib roast dry aging in the fridge
     
  11. Christine Dabney <[email protected]> writes:

    >Get a digital probe thermometer..one where you can set the temp that
    >you want the meat to be.... Perfect every time!!!!


    Thanks for the suggestion. The meat thermometer I have is untested
    and old (inherited) so I think I'll get a new one just to be sure. A
    digital one sounds like a good idea.

    Stacia
     
  12. Never anonymous Bud <[email protected]> writes:

    >First, do you have a GOOD meat thermometer?


    >If not, buy one ASAP.


    >You can coat the roast with herbs of your choice,
    >or just salt and pepper, OR just leave it bare
    >(I usually just use some season salt),
    >then cook to an internal temp of 145-150 degrees.

    [snip]

    Thanks for all your suggestions! I might actually report back on how
    this roast turns out.

    Stacia
     
  13. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays.
    >Also, about how many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is preferable I don't mind leftovers.


    If it's all about presentation and feeling like you've cooked a big
    fancy piece of meat, than by all means purchase a 3-rib roast.
    If on the other hand you just want a delicious piece of beef to share
    with your "significant other" (or whomever), you can greatly reduce the
    amount of hassle by having your/a butcher cut you a single bone
    rib-steak which can easily come in weighing at over 2 lbs. if you
    request a big 'un.
    With an oven-friendly (not non-stick) skillet you can pan-sear it on
    the stovetop on very high heat and pop it in a 450° oven to finish.
    Using the very well advised instant read thermometer, you can pull it
    out when cooked to your liking.
    No 4-hour cook time and a great piece of meat to share... regardless
    of which cut you use, be sure to allow the meat to rest lightly covered
    with foil to allow the juices to redistribute. Make a nice pan sauce
    while you wait. Kev
     
  14. On 20 Dec 2005 10:57:05 -0800, "kevnbro" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Using the very well advised instant read thermometer, you can pull it
    >out when cooked to your liking.

    Not the instant read type thermometer..but the Polder type, where you
    can preset the temp you want the meat to be. You leave the
    thermometer in the roast all during cooking, and it beeps when the
    preset temperature has been reached.

    Since I have been using one of these, there are no more overdone
    roasts, etc.

    The danger with an instant read thermometer is that you will get
    sidetracked and forget to check the meat or check it when it has
    gotten past the point you want it to be.

    Christine
     
  15. On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 14:36:43 -0800, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Not the instant read type thermometer..but the Polder type, where you
    >can preset the temp you want the meat to be. You leave the
    >thermometer in the roast all during cooking, and it beeps when the
    >preset temperature has been reached.


    Yep, that's what I use. AND it's 2 pieces, you can take the
    'head' with you into another room so you never miss the beeping.

    And it's a count-up and count-down timer as well, and cost me about $30.



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  16. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 02:22:34 +0000 (UTC), Glitter Ninja wrote:

    > I got the idea to make a standing rib roast for the holidays. I've
    > never done one before, but my last two beef roasts have been so terribly
    > sad that they ended up shredded in bbq sauce. So I'd like some hints on
    > how to cook the roast medium-rare so I don't ruin it. Also, about how
    > many pounds should I get for two people? If cooking a larger roast is
    > preferable I don't mind leftovers.
    >


    Get at least a 2-3 rib roast. Anything smaller is just a large steak
    with a bone in it. I've made rib roast using the following method
    since it was first published in my local fish wrap.
    :)

    From the San Francisco Chronicle:

    Our Best Way technique turned out to be one of simplest. We
    started with a fairly hot oven -- 450 degrees -- and roasted
    the meat for 15 minutes to sear the outside. We then turned
    the dial down to 350 degrees and finished it off at 20
    minutes per pound (about 1 1/2 hours total for our 3
    1/2-pound roast). We removed it from the oven when a
    thermometer inserted in the middle (not hitting any bone)
    registered 125 degrees. We let it rest for about 20 minutes
    to allow the juices to settle and the meat continue cooking.
    It eventually climbed to about 140 degrees.

    This was prime rib nirvana. Talk about a fantastic roast.
    While Food and Wine staffers were always eager to try the
    prime rib experiments, word quickly spread from the test
    kitchen that this was the one. The meat, succulent and
    buttery, was a perfect bull's eye of doneness: medium toward
    the outside and bouncy pink in the middle.


    Don't forget to make Yorkshire Pudding! I found the same recipe
    attributed to James Beard's "American Cookery" and to The New York
    Times Cookbook by Craig Claiborne. So, it must be good!
    ;)
    http://www.sourdoughhome.com/yorkshirepudding.html
    http://www.recipelink.com/mf/8/16967

    Yorkshire Pudding
    Ingredients

    2 eggs
    1 c milk
    1 c sifted all-purpose flour
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
    Beef Drippings

    Start by pre-heating the oven to 450F. Beat the eggs until quite light
    and gradually beat in the milk and sifted flour. (Or put all in a
    blender or mixer and beat or spin until batter is smooth). Season with
    salt and pepper and a tablespoon or two of hot drippings if you like.
    Heat an 11 x 14 pan and pour in a heavy layer of hot beef drippings.
    Pour in the batter and bake at 450 F about 10 minutes then reduce the
    heat to 375 and continue baking until golden brown, about 15 to 20
    minutes. NOTE: Do NOT open the oven door during the first 20 minutes
    of baking. You can also use muffin pans to make individual servings.

    To serve the large pan, just cut the pudding into squares and take the
    baking dish to the table.

    Personally, I like to make round Yorkshire puddings and cut them into
    wedges.

    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  17. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 17:39:28 +0000 (UTC), Glitter Ninja wrote:

    > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > >Get a digital probe thermometer..one where you can set the temp that
    > >you want the meat to be.... Perfect every time!!!!

    >
    > Thanks for the suggestion. The meat thermometer I have is untested
    > and old (inherited) so I think I'll get a new one just to be sure. A
    > digital one sounds like a good idea.
    >

    Stacia,
    All you really need is an instant read thermometer. They can be found
    for under $10, so you don't need to break the bank for one dinner.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  18. Default User

    Default User Guest

    sf wrote:

    > On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 17:39:28 +0000 (UTC), Glitter Ninja wrote:
    >
    > > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> writes:
    > >
    > > >Get a digital probe thermometer..one where you can set the temp

    > > that >you want the meat to be.... Perfect every time!!!!
    > >
    > > Thanks for the suggestion. The meat thermometer I have is
    > > untested and old (inherited) so I think I'll get a new one just to
    > > be sure. A digital one sounds like a good idea.
    > >

    > Stacia,
    > All you really need is an instant read thermometer. They can be found
    > for under $10, so you don't need to break the bank for one dinner.


    I disagree, probes are better because you don't have to watch the time.
    Otherwise, there's a good chance you won't know you've overcooked until
    it's too late.

    An inexpensive one (like the Taylor I have) are only about $15.



    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
     
  19. sf <[email protected]> writes:

    >Stacia,
    >All you really need is an instant read thermometer. They can be found
    >for under $10, so you don't need to break the bank for one dinner.


    That's true, but my last two roasts were just horrible, so I'm
    thinking a good thermometer might be handy so I can cook roast in the
    oven again. I've been scared off my roast for a few months, ever since
    the last two disasters.

    Stacia
     
  20. Here is my one advice for standing rib roast. Go slow!!!!! I cook one
    every year for Christmas and use a probe thermometer. I sear it on the
    stove first, then into the oven at 2-250 for as long as it takes (rule of
    thumb is about 30mins per pound). Comes out perfectly every time. Good
    luck
    "Glitter Ninja" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > sf <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >>Stacia,
    >>All you really need is an instant read thermometer. They can be found
    >>for under $10, so you don't need to break the bank for one dinner.

    >
    > That's true, but my last two roasts were just horrible, so I'm
    > thinking a good thermometer might be handy so I can cook roast in the
    > oven again. I've been scared off my roast for a few months, ever since
    > the last two disasters.
    >
    > Stacia
    >
     
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