Standing while climbing and fiber composition

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by watts4speed, Apr 22, 2007.

  1. watts4speed

    watts4speed New Member

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    When I climb I tend to sit most of the way, even on the longest climbs. I've noticed other riders who get out of the saddle a lot. For me getting out of the saddle for any time at all results in tired legs very quickly that I have to recover from. I'm not heavy at 158LBS and the othe riders I'm thinking of are not that different weight wise (that is they don't look like Marco Pantani). I'm wondering if this says something about the muscile fiber type I have vs the other riders, something like I may have more Type I fiber which doesn't like the standing. Any ideas I'm dying to know since the difference is so striking compared to other riders? I've trained standing by the way and still find the difference by the way.
     
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  2. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    You need to train to get more comfortable with standing. I read that pros do stand intervals where they would stand for 10mins at a time and repeat.

    Alternating b/n sitting and standing gives your muscles and bum a break.
     
  3. wiredued

    wiredued New Member

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    Pacing is a little more touchy while standing it is easier to cross that line and end up in L5 or even L6 especially if FTP is low.
     
  4. watts4speed

    watts4speed New Member

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    I think this is what's happening. I find I have to hold back when standing to keep from going over my LT on the climbs and then burn a few matches.
     
  5. LewisBricktop

    LewisBricktop New Member

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    Going on somewhat of a tangent, how similar is standing while climbing to standing while fighting a strong headwind in the flats? I know that it actually creates more surface area for the wind to push against, but sometimes I find myself needing to stand up and sprint for a few seconds to get my speed up when into a 15+ mph headwind. Yesterday for example, I had 25-30mph winds that made a false flat feel like the Alpe D'huez.
     
  6. bikeguy

    bikeguy New Member

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    Recently I tried doing a few standing intervals - I was very pleased to see that I can stand ride the bike for about 5-7 minutes at a good clip at the end of a fair length ride. Last year my legs went to jelly after about 30 seconds of standing. Should help in charging hills and sprinting at the end of a race.

    -bikeguy
     
  7. watts4speed

    watts4speed New Member

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    Can you give more detail on the kinds of intervals you did? For example were they 5-7 minutes in length or at 0.91% of LT?
     
  8. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Probably fairly similar in one respect: they both make it pretty likely that you'll overextend yourself during a short acceleration and then eventually have to slow the pace even further in order to recover. ;)

    I've felt the benefits of occasionally standing while climbing to stretch out or climb at low cadences during steep sections, but I can't really think of any situations which call for standing in a strong headwind. Even sprinting in the saddle can be more effective in a strong wind. :confused:
     
  9. bikeguy

    bikeguy New Member

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    No, they weren't even close to LT - I didn't feel tired after doing them and I did them mostly on the flat. I don't have a PM - but they weren't hard.

    -bikeguy
     
  10. smithpauln

    smithpauln New Member

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    You need to get the balance of your weight distributed correctly, not too far back, not too far forward. I find that by adjusting until it feels right I can use my body weight to push the pedals down rather than just purely rotating. This requires a lower cadence, it doesn't work for Lance-like spinning.
     
  11. cdy291

    cdy291 New Member

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    I actually find it to be easier to stand than to sit on a climb. When I stand up and turn a big gear on a climb my heart rate goes down considerably.
     
  12. CSShelby

    CSShelby New Member

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    Interesting thread. My riding partner used to ride bmx and rids mountain a lot. His stand up is far superior to mine. But on most hills if I time it right and hit the right gear and spin a high cadence sitting I usually can motor on by him (though I don't due to traffic concerns which usually kills that momentum).

    But I experience the same problem with burning out climbing while standing. I've tried the larger gear method but it's much slower than if I were to sit and spin.
     
  13. linusrees

    linusrees New Member

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  14. john979

    john979 New Member

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    Climbing while seated is more efficient than climbing while standing. Many powerful riders (Indurain, Ullrich) climb seated. I prefer to climb seated and will only stand when the grade is very steep or when on a very long climb to rest my back.

    Why are you trying to emulate others instead of perfecting your own technique?
     
  15. watts4speed

    watts4speed New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. My intent of asking the question was to get a better understanding of what causes the difference rather than figure out how to change my style. I'm so much at one end of the climb/sit spectrum that I was wondering what the reasons for it were. Anyone have any ideas?
     
  16. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    The conventional explanation is that there the muscles are being used differently b/n the two positions. So by switching position, you give some muscles a bit of a rest before going back to them. There's probably truth in that but more importantly for me, it gives my bum a rest by standing.
     
  17. john979

    john979 New Member

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    Do you have a power meter? What is your corresponding power?
     
  18. john979

    john979 New Member

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    OK. One thing I have learned is that without objective data, accurate analysis is impossible. Do you have a power meter? If so, you can get an idea of your fiber composition from your power profile.
     
  19. cdy291

    cdy291 New Member

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    Nope, No power meter.
     
  20. john979

    john979 New Member

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    I have a power meter on my road bike and indoor trainer. The indoor trainer allows for very controlled conditions. I find, and it is well documented, that under isopower conditions, a lower cadence induces a slightly heart rate. However, the power level might not be sustainable. Personally, I also find that perceived exertion increases as cadence decreases, again under isopower conditions.

    Standing, for the same power and cadence, will induce a higher heart rate, due to increased upper body motion and more upright position (standing heart rate is higher than seated).

    If your heart rate is significantly decreasing while standing, you might be producing less power.
     
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