Stapleton, today's NYTimes, the odor of USOC corruption

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bikeadman, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Bikeadman

    Bikeadman Guest

    From the NY Times, Jan. 14:

    U.S.O.C. Chief Stays On as Latest Furor Ends

    By RICHARD SANDOMIR

    AURORA, Colo., Jan. 13 — Lloyd Ward retained his position as the chief executive of the United
    States Olympic Committee today despite an ethics report that said he had fostered "the appearance of
    a conflict of interest" when he assisted his brother's business venture. "Lloyd's job was not in
    danger today," Bill Stapleton, a U.S.O.C. vice president, said after a meeting of the 22-member
    executive committee. "This group stands 100 percent behind him. He admits this was an error in
    judgment. For us, this is over." Advertisement

    Ward said: "I don't feel reprimanded. There is no mention of a reprimand." The subject of whether
    Ward would remain chief executive was not raised during a nearly five-hour meeting at a suburban
    hotel here, and Stapleton said 80 percent of the executive committee's members concurred with the
    report's findings. Ward signed a contract in November 2001 that either Ward or the U.S.O.C. could
    terminate at any time. His salary is $550,000, in addition to bonuses and performance incentives.
    For more than two weeks, the executive committee has been buffeted by renewed turmoil over the
    leadership at the U.S.O.C., which has had four chief executives since 2000, and what disciplinary
    action, if any, might be warranted against Ward. The organization, the most powerful of all
    national Olympic committees, has been described as being, at best, dysfunctional, with an unwieldy
    structure that places much of its power in a 120-member board of directors with myriad interests.
    Marty Mankamyer, who became the U.S.O.C.'s president last May after Sandra Baldwin resigned for
    falsifying her résumé, said, "We may appear to be in costume at times, but we're O.K." Mankamyer
    said she had become aware in October that Ward, in a note to a staff member last April, had said
    that a proposal by Energy Management Technologies to supply microturbines for backup power at the
    2003 Pan American Games "could be beneficial." At the time, Ward's brother, Rubert, was the
    president of the company. With help from the U.S.O.C. staff member Hernando Madronero, the $4.6
    million proposal, which fell through, reached the Pan American Games' project manager. Rubert Ward
    and Energy Management Technologies' chief executive later wrote to Lloyd Ward, thanking him for his
    help. Lloyd Ward's involvement was kept within the U.S.O.C. until it was disclosed by The Los
    Angeles Times on Dec. 30. The ethics report determined that Ward's conduct created the appearance
    of a conflict of interest and that he "failed to make a written disclosure of the potential
    financial interest" of his brother in his annual disclosure to the U.S.O.C. last July. "I made an
    error in judgment," Ward said, but he added, "I can't point to it as a lapse in judgment." Shortly
    after the matter was disclosed publicly, Mankamyer called the accusations against Ward "serious and
    disturbing." Today, Mankamyer revised her opinion. "I had not seen the ethics committee report, and
    until I saw it, I couldn't make an accurate statement," she said. The report castigated the
    U.S.O.C. for not enforcing its ethics code when Ward first made his request to Madronero regarding
    his brother's company. Ward said today that when he saw the proposal from Energy Management
    Technologies, he did not know that another company — Aggreko Inc., a power-generating company in
    Houston — was a U.S.O.C. supplier that had provided backup generators to the last four Summer
    Olympics and the last two Winter Games. Aggreko's role as a U.S.O.C. supplier did not guarantee
    that it would receive the contract to provide backup power for the Pan Am Games in the Dominican
    Republic. But as a U.S.O.C. supplier, it had more experience than Energy Management Technologies.
    "I was not aware of the relationship with Aggreko," Ward said. "I'm embarrassed to say it."
    Although Ward knew Sunday that the report did not accuse him of an ethics violation and that his
    job was not in jeopardy, he nonetheless brought two lawyers here to make sure he received due
    process at the meeting. He said he had been concerned that the "speculation aired in the press" and
    the leaking of his e-mail messages to the executive committee could lead to a one-sided airing of
    the issue. But, he said, "The response of the executive committee to my concerns was swift,
    successful and effective." While the executive committee appears to have extinguished the brush
    fire over Ward's actions, U.S.O.C. officials said that they needed to work better together to avoid
    similar problems in the future. "There is a concern that we tend not to operate as a cohesive unit
    at times," said Stapleton, one of the U.S.O.C.'s five vice presidents. There will be weekly
    conference calls and hands-on contact with sponsors by the officers, William Martin, another vice
    president, said. "We have some things to work on," Ward said. "We acknowledge that. We have a lot
    of room for improvement. But a lot of things are right."
     
    Tags:


  2. Add to that Darth B's statements in the VeloNews interview that he sees no conflict of
    interest in Johnson being with USAC and the Development fund and it's beginning to look like
    politics in Louisiana---a state where the concept of conflicts of interest doesn't exist (fun
    details on request).

    Brian Lafferty

    --
    "BikeAdman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > From the NY Times, Jan. 14:
    >
    > U.S.O.C. Chief Stays On as Latest Furor Ends
    >
    > By RICHARD SANDOMIR
    >
    >
    > AURORA, Colo., Jan. 13 - Lloyd Ward retained his position as the chief executive of the United
    > States Olympic Committee today despite an ethics
    report
    > that said he had fostered "the appearance of a conflict of interest" when
    he
    > assisted his brother's business venture. "Lloyd's job was not in danger today," Bill Stapleton, a
    > U.S.O.C. vice president, said after a meeting of the 22-member executive committee.
    "This
    > group stands 100 percent behind him. He admits this was an error in
    judgment.
    > For us, this is over." Advertisement
    >
    >
    > Ward said: "I don't feel reprimanded. There is no mention of a reprimand." The subject of whether
    > Ward would remain chief executive was not raised
    during
    > a nearly five-hour meeting at a suburban hotel here, and Stapleton said 80 percent of the
    > executive committee's members concurred with the report's findings. Ward signed a contract in
    > November 2001 that either Ward or the U.S.O.C.
    could
    > terminate at any time. His salary is $550,000, in addition to bonuses and performance incentives.
    > For more than two weeks, the executive committee has been buffeted by
    renewed
    > turmoil over the leadership at the U.S.O.C., which has had four chief executives since 2000, and
    > what disciplinary action, if any, might be
    warranted
    > against Ward. The organization, the most powerful of all national Olympic committees, has been
    > described as being, at best, dysfunctional, with an unwieldy structure that places much of its
    > power in a 120-member board of directors with myriad interests. Marty Mankamyer, who became the
    > U.S.O.C.'s president last May after Sandra Baldwin resigned for falsifying her résumé, said, "We
    > may appear to be in costume at times, but we're O.K." Mankamyer said she had become aware in
    > October that Ward, in a note to a
    staff
    > member last April, had said that a proposal by Energy Management
    Technologies
    > to supply microturbines for backup power at the 2003 Pan American Games
    "could
    > be beneficial." At the time, Ward's brother, Rubert, was the president of
    the
    > company. With help from the U.S.O.C. staff member Hernando Madronero, the $4.6
    million
    > proposal, which fell through, reached the Pan American Games' project
    manager.
    > Rubert Ward and Energy Management Technologies' chief executive later
    wrote to
    > Lloyd Ward, thanking him for his help. Lloyd Ward's involvement was kept
    within
    > the U.S.O.C. until it was disclosed by The Los Angeles Times on Dec. 30. The ethics report
    > determined that Ward's conduct created the appearance of
    a
    > conflict of interest and that he "failed to make a written disclosure of
    the
    > potential financial interest" of his brother in his annual disclosure to
    the
    > U.S.O.C. last July. "I made an error in judgment," Ward said, but he added, "I can't point to
    it as
    > a lapse in judgment." Shortly after the matter was disclosed publicly, Mankamyer called the
    > accusations against Ward "serious and disturbing." Today, Mankamyer revised her opinion. "I had
    > not seen the ethics committee report, and until I saw it, I couldn't make an accurate
    > statement," she
    said.
    > The report castigated the U.S.O.C. for not enforcing its ethics code when
    Ward
    > first made his request to Madronero regarding his brother's company. Ward said today that when he
    > saw the proposal from Energy Management Technologies, he did not know that another company -
    > Aggreko Inc., a power-generating company in Houston - was a U.S.O.C. supplier that had provided
    > backup generators to the last four Summer Olympics and the last
    two
    > Winter Games. Aggreko's role as a U.S.O.C. supplier did not guarantee that it would
    receive
    > the contract to provide backup power for the Pan Am Games in the Dominican Republic. But as a
    > U.S.O.C. supplier, it had more experience than Energy Management Technologies. "I was not aware of
    > the relationship with Aggreko," Ward said. "I'm
    embarrassed
    > to say it." Although Ward knew Sunday that the report did not accuse him of an ethics violation
    > and that his job was not in jeopardy, he nonetheless brought two lawyers here to make sure he
    > received due process at the meeting. He said
    he
    > had been concerned that the "speculation aired in the press" and the
    leaking of
    > his e-mail messages to the executive committee could lead to a one-sided
    airing
    > of the issue. But, he said, "The response of the executive committee to my concerns was swift,
    > successful and effective." While the executive committee appears to have extinguished the
    > brush fire
    over
    > Ward's actions, U.S.O.C. officials said that they needed to work better together to avoid similar
    > problems in the future. "There is a concern that
    we
    > tend not to operate as a cohesive unit at times," said Stapleton, one of
    the
    > U.S.O.C.'s five vice presidents. There will be weekly conference calls and hands-on contact with
    > sponsors by the officers, William Martin, another
    vice
    > president, said. "We have some things to work on," Ward said. "We acknowledge that. We have
    a
    > lot of room for improvement. But a lot of things are right."
    >
    >
    >
     
  3. >Subject: Re: Stapleton, today's NYTimes, the odor of USOC corruption From: "Brian Lafferty"

    >it's beginning to look like politics in Louisiana

    hey [email protected] didn't they run you out of town on a rail there? or was it one of those "court
    ordered relocation" things again? Allegedly......

    -----Sharon Peters Personal Trainer to the Stars-------- Remove "No Junk" to reply please!!!
     
  4. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "BikeAdman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > From the NY Times, Jan. 14:
    >
    > U.S.O.C. Chief Stays On as Latest Furor Ends

    It isn't at all clear what Stapleton was supposed to do that was a conflict of interest.
    Micro-turbines? Is this to say that he thought that his brother's products were effective for
    power backup?

    Let me tell you a little story about Olympic Committees. I worked at a company that made intecom
    systems. Very expensive and very complex intercoms that are used by all of the major TV networks
    and local stations and also are used by radio stations all over the world. Not a big company mind
    you since this business isn't that big. But the second largest intercom company in the world at
    that time.

    The Olympic Committee approached us and told us that we had been "selected" as the official supplier
    of intercom systems for the Winter Olympics where ever the hell in the US it was back in the early
    90's I think.

    We asked them to supply a list of what they wanted. When it came in, this is what the deal was -
    they would take 100% of all our production capacity for a year and a half. They wouldn't BUY the
    stuff, but would LEASE it. The lease value would be a small portion of the purchase price. We would
    have to customize a great deal of the products to fit the somewhat trying conditions of hanging
    wires over miles of snow covered mountains by just tossing it down on the ground. We would then
    have to figure out how to sell used stuff while not having produced any new equipment for a year
    and a half.

    We would receive payment for our leased stuff when they felt like it.

    If this is the common sort of deal that Olympic Committees offer I can't help but think that prior
    suppliers probably wouldn't be interested in their business anyway.

    Yes, we politely told them that we didn't have capacity for their intercoms and we recommended our
    hottest competitor. It they took the deal it would have given us a huge lead in the intercom
    business. I don't know what happened since I move to a different company at that time.
     
  5. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    [email protected] (jim gravity) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message:
    >
    > > Let me tell you a little story about...

    A posting appears in which it seems to be implied that Stapleton was involved in something rather
    unsavory - the removal of one supplier and the installation of another owned by a relative.

    Of course the Olympic Committee seems to have found that it was only the appearance of a conflict of
    interest and not an actual conflict.

    But that didn't stop comments here from implying that now the conflict of interest was both true and
    now a result of a ruling of the USOC.

    I reply with an personal experience with the way the Olympics are run which shows that there could
    easily be many reasons why there was no conflict EVER.

    Jim Gravity avoids the issue in order to make a personal insult.

    So tell us, oh heavy one, if I were to have made this entire story up, what possible difference
    would it make to the issue at hand? Would that void the strong possibility that previous suppliers
    didn't want anything to do with the Olympics this time around? Would it change the position of the
    Committee if Stapleton's brother was able to offer the same service for a lower price or a superior
    product for the same price or a required superior product at an additional cost that the competition
    didn't offer?

    It is just the mind numbing stupidity of people like you that make Usenet what it is.
     
  6. Jim Gravity

    Jim Gravity Guest

    [email protected] (Tom Kunich) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > if I were to have made this entire story up,

    It's not that complicated.

    I just thought this was funny:

    > > Let me tell you a little story about...

    > It is just the mind numbing stupidity of people like you that make Usenet what it is.

    There are far stoopider around here.
     
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