Stationary 'bent: A fair comparison to the real thing comfort-wise?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by x, Feb 17, 2003.

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  1. x

    x Guest

    Based on my experience with exercise bikes vs my MTB, I'd guess not - but the question still has
    to be asked.

    At the gym the other day, I tried an hour on one of thier stationary 'bents (PreCor).

    If a real 'bent is anything like that, I couldn't do it. My bony butt was aching from about the
    first 20 minutes on - and before winter set in, I was doing 2-3 hours 3-4 times a week on my MTB
    with no problem.

    Is the stationary 'bent in the gym anywhere near a fair test?
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
    Tags:


  2. Dave Miller

    Dave Miller Guest

    On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 00:51:44 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Based on my experience with exercise bikes vs my MTB, I'd guess not - but the question still has to
    >be asked.
    >
    >At the gym the other day, I tried an hour on one of thier stationary 'bents (PreCor).
    >
    >If a real 'bent is anything like that, I couldn't do it. My bony butt was aching from about the
    >first 20 minutes on - and before winter set in, I was doing 2-3 hours 3-4 times a week on my MTB
    >with no problem.
    >
    >Is the stationary 'bent in the gym anywhere near a fair test?
    >-----------------------
    >PeteCresswell

    Peter, I use a road and a stationary recumbent as well as a MTB. No, the "road" recumbent seats are
    not a lot like the stationary.

    Interestingly, the stationary versions usually have a lot MORE cushion that doesn't seem to
    work as well. I can only ride about 20 minutes on the stationary but have no problems with
    hours on the road.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Dave Miller <> says...
    > On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 00:51:44 GMT, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Based on my experience with exercise bikes vs my MTB, I'd guess not - but the question still has
    > >to be asked.
    > >
    > >At the gym the other day, I tried an hour on one of thier stationary 'bents (PreCor).
    > >
    > >If a real 'bent is anything like that, I couldn't do it. My bony butt was aching from about the
    > >first 20 minutes on - and before winter set in, I was doing 2-3 hours 3-4 times a week on my MTB
    > >with no problem.
    > >
    > >Is the stationary 'bent in the gym anywhere near a fair test?
    > >-----------------------
    > >PeteCresswell
    >
    > Peter, I use a road and a stationary recumbent as well as a MTB. No, the "road" recumbent seats
    > are not a lot like the stationary.
    >
    > Interestingly, the stationary versions usually have a lot MORE cushion that doesn't seem to work
    > as well. I can only ride about 20 minutes on the stationary but have no problems with hours on
    > the road.
    >

    Peter - real bents are much more comfortable for long periods of time than a gym bent (which I also
    ride when the weather is bad) for the following reasons:

    1. With a low-racer type design using something like an M5 seat, they have a very ergo fit with
    good lumbar support and you are quite reclined so the weight is spread over a lot of your
    back side.

    2. The some of the above-mentioned and with most more "upright" recumbents the seats are often
    highly strung mesh which conform to your body more although there is a phenomenon called
    "recumbent butt" which is what you are referring to I think and does exist on more upright bikes
    where most of the weight is on the rear end. In any case, on a moving recumbent on the road, you
    are rocking and shifting weight around more than on a gym bent.

    Regards Chris
     
  4. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    The stationary recumbents usually have very upright seats that are designed more for durability and
    easy cleaning rather than comfort. That said, I have managed an hour on one, and probably will again
    today. The other thing is I can't really hammer on it or my knees hurt because the Q factor is so
    high on these things.

    You have a much wider range of choices about seats and bike configuartion with road recumbents.

    Boredom is probably the biggest problem. Daytime TV is unwatchable, and I think I would rather be
    _in_ a war than watch an hour of CNN endlessly speculating about one. I usually manage a level of
    intensity that makes it difficult for me to read.

    John Riley
     
  5. Baronn1

    Baronn1 Guest

    I do ride the gym recumbent trainers, but the seats suck. I find the bottom is too deep, that is too
    much of my leb contacts the seat, instead of just the glutes. Also, the seatbacks are very upright,
    so I have to scoot my butt out, loosing all back support. No comparison, any bent seat I've been on
    is better (BikeE, Haluzak, EZ Sport, RANS, Bacchetta)

    "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Based on my experience with exercise bikes vs my MTB, I'd guess not - but
    the
    > question still has to be asked.
    >
    > At the gym the other day, I tried an hour on one of thier stationary
    'bents
    > (PreCor).
    >
    > If a real 'bent is anything like that, I couldn't do it. My bony butt
    was
    > aching from about the first 20 minutes on - and before winter set in, I
    was
    > doing 2-3 hours 3-4 times a week on my MTB with no problem.
    >
    > Is the stationary 'bent in the gym anywhere near a fair test?
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell
     
  6. John Riley wrote:

    > Boredom is probably the biggest problem. Daytime TV is unwatchable, and I think I would rather be
    > _in_ a war than watch an hour of CNN endlessly speculating about one. I usually manage a level of
    > intensity that makes it difficult for me to read.

    When driving the turbo trainer, I have a cheap and cheerful CD / Radio / cassette next to the bike.
    I have found that The Hives make an excellent accompaniment for maintaining three-figure cadence :)

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  7. Jackal

    Jackal Guest

    "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Based on my experience with exercise bikes vs my MTB, I'd guess not - but the question still has
    > to be asked.
    >
    > At the gym the other day, I tried an hour on one of thier stationary 'bents (PreCor).
    >
    > If a real 'bent is anything like that, I couldn't do it. My bony butt was aching from about the
    > first 20 minutes on - and before winter set in, I was doing 2-3 hours 3-4 times a week on my MTB
    > with no problem.
    >
    > Is the stationary 'bent in the gym anywhere near a fair test?
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    Fit is critical on a recumbent. A 1/2" move can sometimes be night and day for comfort or peddling.
    If you've not ridden one, it's not likely that you'd "fit" yourself just right. another factor.
     
  8. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    "baronn1" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I do ride the gym recumbent trainers, but the seats suck.

    Nothing much to add, but my vote. I had a Tunturi stationary recumbent, and riding it for 20 minutes
    was shear murder. Nearly any "mobile" recumbent can be ridden for hours before any incompatibilty
    between seat and body become evident. Should I decide to ride stationary again, I'll just install
    one of those resistance trainers on my trike.

    rorschandt
     
  9. "rorschandt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "baronn1" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > I do ride the gym recumbent trainers, but the seats suck.
    >
    > Nothing much to add, but my vote. I had a Tunturi stationary recumbent,
    and
    > riding it for 20 minutes was shear murder. Nearly any "mobile" recumbent can be ridden for hours
    > before any incompatibilty between seat and body become evident. Should I decide to ride stationary
    > again, I'll just install one of those resistance trainers on my trike.
    >
    > rorschandt

    I recently finished Physical Therapy for a total knee replacement. I had a choice of a recumbent or
    a "DF/wedgie". I chose the DF even though I ride a Scarab trike. There was no comparison with
    comfort. (Admittedly, at first, gravity helped my legs during the early PT stages on the DF whereas
    I had to fight gravity with the 'bent, but only the very early stages.)

    Within a month of surgery, I had about 12" of foam seat cushion material placed on my mesh seat and
    struggled to turn the pedals even one revolution. After two weeks, the extra foam cushions were gone
    and I was spinning (on rollers) for twenty minutes and ready for a ride on the streets. In the
    meantime, I *still* used the upright/DF PT bike for the "formal" PT sessions.

    To me there just isn't any easy comparison. Why the PT 'bent was so uncomfortable I'll never know. I
    do know that riding my trike on the street within one month of the surgery did more for my recovery
    than all that stationary time.

    YMMV

    Michael Pilla
     
  10. Danxerox

    Danxerox Guest

    >Subject: Re: Stationary 'bent: A fair comparison to the real thing comfort-wise? From: John Riley
    >[email protected] Date: 2/18/03 2:52 AM Pacific Standard Time Message-id:
    ><[email protected]>

    (snip)

    >Boredom is probably the biggest problem. Daytime TV is unwatchable, and I think I would rather be
    >_in_ a war than watch an hour of CNN endlessly speculating about one. I usually manage a level of
    >intensity that makes it difficult for me to read.
    >
    >John Riley

    How about books on tape (or on Cd)? Should be available at your local library, at least in a
    limited way.
     
  11. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    John:

    I have a set of Kreitler rollers that I sometimes use with my V-Rex, and a fork stand if I don't
    want to bother to balance. That said, however, I haven't used them in over a year. My indoor
    exercise is almost entirely limitted to a Concept II rowing machine, because of the "full body"
    workout it gives me. There's still the boredom problem though. I usually exercise around 7 to 8 PM,
    so the TV is better at that hour. With GERD I have to eat after exercise though, which is a bit of a
    nuisance starting dinner at 9PM. GERD isn't such a problem on the bike.

    --
    --Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.

    "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The stationary recumbents usually have very upright seats that are designed more for durability
    > and easy cleaning rather than comfort. That said, I have managed an hour on one, and probably will
    > again today. The other thing is I can't really hammer on it or my knees hurt because the Q factor
    > is so high on these things.
    >
    > You have a much wider range of choices about seats and bike configuartion with road recumbents.
    >
    > Boredom is probably the biggest problem. Daytime TV is unwatchable, and I think I would rather be
    > _in_ a war than watch an hour of CNN endlessly speculating about one. I usually manage a level of
    > intensity that makes it difficult for me to read.
    >
    > John Riley
     
  12. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    Are you guys at RANS, Bacchetta, Vision, Easy Racers listening to this? I smell an opportunity to
    sell a few seats to the stationary bike insdustry!
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, "Freewheeling" says...
    >
    >I have a set of Kreitler rollers that I sometimes use with my V-Rex, and a fork stand if I don't
    >want to bother to balance. That said, however, I haven't used them in over a year. My indoor
    >exercise is almost entirely limitted to a Concept II rowing machine, because of the "full body"
    >workout it gives me.

    Wow, you actually USE your rowing machine? I don't think I've ever encountered a human who actually
    used their rowing machine for more than about two weeks before parking it forever. Way to go!

    Steve
     
  14. Baronn1

    Baronn1 Guest

    tellme who strikes the deal, and sign be up to buy their bike.. Might look into adapting a RANS seat
    to our recumbo trainer myself. "Seth Jayson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Are you guys at RANS, Bacchetta, Vision, Easy Racers listening to this? I smell an opportunity to
    > sell a few seats to the stationary bike insdustry!
     
  15. Recumbent butt burn is a common experience especially to entry level recumbent riders. Still happens
    to me after a hard effort. Your weight is on the muscle group doing the most work. Upright style
    recumbent seating makes it worse. Laid back style puts more weight on the back yet this style not
    often found in gyms. Web or sling seats distribute the load over a wider area reducing the problem.
    Proper leg length adjustment is very important. Maybe even more important then on an upright bike in
    that with a recumbent your stuck between a rock (seat) and a hard place (pedals) As a recumbent
    racer I say seat adjustment is plus or minus 1/4" in order to get proper power and not grind the
    body down. For indoor workouts I use my road bike. Fit is perfect that way. I hope you haven't
    gotten the wrong impression of recumbents from a stationary gym experience. Happy cycling Speedy

    "(Pete Cresswell)" wrote:

    > Based on my experience with exercise bikes vs my MTB, I'd guess not - but the question still has
    > to be asked.
    >
    > At the gym the other day, I tried an hour on one of thier stationary 'bents (PreCor).
    >
    > If a real 'bent is anything like that, I couldn't do it. My bony butt was aching from about the
    > first 20 minutes on - and before winter set in, I was doing 2-3 hours 3-4 times a week on my MTB
    > with no problem.
    >
    > Is the stationary 'bent in the gym anywhere near a fair test?
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  16. A&B

    A&B Guest

    S., I agree. Adjust it a smidgeon at a time and when it's right it's like having an extra gear. bill
    "rotors make good bookends" g
    P.S. How many R-100's did you build ;-) First one I did the guy in the next bay filled the exhaust
    with water. I almost cried when it all came blowing out when the thing started.

    "S. Delaire \"Rotatorrecumbent\"" wrote:
    >

    > Proper leg length adjustment is very important. Maybe even more important then on an upright bike
    > in that with a recumbent your stuck between a rock (seat) and a hard place (pedals) As a recumbent
    > racer I say seat adjustment is plus or minus 1/4" in order to get
     
  17. Haven't thought about or seen a R-100 for awhile. The lightest version of the first Mazda's. We
    stuffed a 400 horse, 13B motor in one. Nothing like the thrill of the throttle! A bit tweaky but
    what a gas. Instead of water in the tail pipe we had a joker that would fill the pipes with
    firecrackers when the motor was out. It would sometimes take a while before they went off. Going
    down the road and then bang, bang. Speedy

    a&b wrote:

    > S., I agree. Adjust it a smidgeon at a time and when it's right it's like having an extra gear.
    > bill "rotors make good bookends" g
    > P.S. How many R-100's did you build ;-) First one I did the guy in the next bay filled the exhaust
    > with water. I almost cried when it all came blowing out when the thing started.
    >
    > "S. Delaire \"Rotatorrecumbent\"" wrote:
    > >
    >
    > > Proper leg length adjustment is very important. Maybe even more important then on an upright
    > > bike in that with a recumbent your stuck between a rock (seat) and a hard place (pedals) As a
    > > recumbent racer I say seat adjustment is plus or minus 1/4" in order to get

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  18. A&B

    A&B Guest

    S., Well, me neither for that matter. We built a bunch of 12A's and then did a bunch of 13B
    shortblock warranty exchanges. I bet you were one of the folks that were tapping spark plugs
    higher in the housings to get a better kick over the top when the second pair fired. At 12-16k rpm
    those suckers would hit their stride. They also would suck a Big Mac or fries down the secondaries
    and when that hit the thermal reactor, make the shop smell like Micky D's. Almost as much fun was
    a bunch of washers on the secondaries. Set the spring tension to where they opened a little later,
    and you could lift a wheel when they seized. Hey, this was all in the name of science, and besides
    we were sending the cores back to Mazda. billg

    "S. Delaire \"Rotatorrecumbent\"" wrote:
    >
    > Haven't thought about or seen a R-100 for awhile. The lightest version of the first Mazda's. We
    > stuffed a 400 horse, 13B motor in one. Nothing like the thrill of the throttle! A bit tweaky but
    > what a gas. Instead of water in the tail pipe we had a joker that would fill the pipes with
    > firecrackers when the motor was out. It would sometimes take a while before they went off. Going
    > down the road and then bang, bang. Speedy
    >
    > a&b wrote:
    >
    > > S., I agree. Adjust it a smidgeon at a time and when it's right it's like having an extra gear.
    > > bill "rotors make good bookends" g
    > > P.S. How many R-100's did you build ;-) First one I did the guy in the next bay filled the
    > > exhaust with water. I almost cried when it all came blowing out when the thing started.
    > >
    > > "S. Delaire \"Rotatorrecumbent\"" wrote:
    > > >
    > >
    > > > Proper leg length adjustment is very important. Maybe even more important then on an upright
    > > > bike in that with a recumbent your stuck between a rock (seat) and a hard place (pedals) As a
    > > > recumbent racer I say seat adjustment is plus or minus 1/4" in order to get
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
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