Stationary Bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by 10sguy, Aug 2, 2003.

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  1. 10sguy

    10sguy Guest

    Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in shape during the off season?
     
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  2. Budman

    Budman Guest

    Buy an inexpensive set of rollers and ride them instead of a stationary bike or trainer. My rollers
    by Tacx cost $100 at the LBS. Rode the heck out of them this winter with no problems. Since you have
    to pay attention to your spin and balance the time passes quickly. You won't the hammer drills in on
    rollers as you would a good resistance trainer , but you will gain technique. The rollers are not
    that hard to learn either. I was comfortable enough with them after about 30 minutes of using a
    doorway to grab on to. Now all I need is a high back chair to assist me when mounting and
    dismounting. "10Sguy" <[email protected]@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in
    shape
    > during the off season?
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "10Sguy"
    <[email protected]@nowhere.com> writes:
    > Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in shape during the off season?

    Sooner or later, somebody's gonna bug ya about how there is no "off season", refer you to the
    icebike web site, wax pedantic about tires 'n stuff, and generally try to make you feel like a dweeb
    for even considering not riding because of the weather.

    But it's not gonna be me.

    As BudMan suggested, get the rollers. That's what I, and many others have done.

    I got mine by asking at an LBS; the guy told me to hang on and wait awhile, 'cuz he knew someone who
    was intending to sell his. Eventually I got 'em, cheap. I used them until I couldn't stand it
    anymore, and /had/ to take it out on the street, and f*** the weather.

    "Riding" and "indoors" are incongruous. Yes, there are times when the elements are too unkind. But
    there are also (hopefully) times when the elements are less unkind.

    So, get yourself some cheap rollers. The rest, you'll take from there, because as Sinead O'Connor
    sang, "nothing compares" (to /real/ riding on /real/ streets).

    There are a lot of cheap 2nd/3rd/4th-hand rollers out there, handed down from ppl who've been
    through it all before.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. On Sat, 2 Aug 2003 23:24:58 -0700, [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, "10Sguy"
    ><[email protected]@nowhere.com> writes:
    >> Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in shape during the off
    >> season?

    The Giant Tempo.

    Rides like a "real" bike, can be fitted as a fixie or with a freewheel.

    Barry
     
  5. 10sguy

    10sguy Guest

    I appreciate the benefits of riding my "real" bike on rollers. However, I'd rather use a stationary
    bike that will allow me to do other things, such as read or watch TV, while getting my workout. For
    me, It's just too boring riding inside.

    Can anyone suggest a good online source for any of the recommend bikes (Tunturi, Giant & Schwinn)?

    Thanks.

    "10Sguy" <[email protected]@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in
    shape
    > during the off season?
     
  6. Icebike

    Icebike Guest

    [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "10Sguy"
    > <[email protected]@nowhere.com> writes:
    > > Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in shape during the off
    > > season?
    >
    > Sooner or later, somebody's gonna bug ya about how there is no "off season", refer you to the
    > icebike web site, wax pedantic about tires 'n stuff, and generally try to make you feel like a
    > dweeb for even considering not riding because of the weather.
    >
    > But it's not gonna be me.

    Ok, If Tom won't I will... http://www.icebike.com/

    Riding on frosty winter days is WAY more fun and more exercise than rollers. Its not dangerous,
    cold, or difficult. Check the site and try it. You can always go back to the rollers if you
    have to...
     
  7. Joe

    Joe Guest

    How about using your real bike on a trainer? I use the Kurt Kinetic and it is very good. If you use
    an exercise bike you will have a different position and use different muscles that when you ride
    your real bike.

    Joe

    > I appreciate the benefits of riding my "real" bike on rollers. However,
    I'd
    > rather use a stationary bike that will allow me to do other things, such
    as
    > read or watch TV, while getting my workout. For me, It's just too boring riding inside.
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 5 Aug 2003 03:00:22 -0700, icebike <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Riding on frosty winter days is WAY more fun and more exercise than rollers. Its not dangerous,
    > cold, or difficult.

    How do you breath? My lungs burn terribly if I try to breath for excersize in cold weather.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  9. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On 5 Aug 2003 03:00:22 -0700, icebike <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Riding on frosty winter days is WAY more fun and more exercise than rollers. Its not dangerous,
    >> cold, or difficult.
    >
    >How do you breath? My lungs burn terribly if I try to breath for excersize in cold weather.

    what is cold for you? Lots of people exersize in cold weather, XC skiers, hockey, alpinisme, ice
    skating, etc. Maybe you get used to it. Never bothered me.
    --
    --
    LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Did you know that 86% of North Americans cannot taste the difference between
    fried dog and fried cat?
     
  10. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Wed, 06 Aug 2003 00:13:32 GMT, Pete Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> How do you breath? My lungs burn terribly if I try to breath for excersize in cold weather.
    >
    > what is cold for you? Lots of people exersize in cold weather, XC skiers, hockey, alpinisme, ice
    > skating, etc. Maybe you get used to it. Never bothered me.

    Yes, lots of people do. I find that as the temp gets near 40 degrees I can start to feel it, and
    below 40 it gets pretty tough.

    Our winter here was very long and below 40 probably from October through April or even May...except
    one day, I think in April that was 80 degrees (with 37 degree days flanking it).

    How about very cold riding, where the cold air hurts the skin? Like I said, we had a bad winter, and
    maybe two months straight of below freezing almost every day.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  11. >How about very cold riding, where the cold air hurts the skin? Like I said, we had a bad winter,
    >and maybe two months straight of below freezing almost every day.

    Same here. I didn't miss a day. I'm not bragging but if you dress for the ride it's easier to deal
    with the cold than the heat, at least for me.

    Basically, it's easier to stay warm than deal with super humid and hot conditions. Or freezing rain
    and sleet, those are the worst.

    With modern fabrics you have a lot of choices in terms of layering in the cold. Also it is possible
    to be wet yet still warm and toasty in fairly cold temperatures. Say in the teens Fahrenheit.

    Good gloves and socks are a must, if you have to cover your face there are plenty of options.

    This isn't everything on the subject, but it is possible to ride a bicycle comfortably in
    temperatures and weather that are fairly extreme.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  12. NuTz4BiKeZ

    NuTz4BiKeZ New Member

    Joined:
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    I agree riding in cold weather is great although a strong wind can really chill you... Much better than sitting around pretending to ride inside :D
     
  13. "10Sguy" <[email protected]@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Can anyone recommend a good stationary bike that I can use to keep in shape during the off season?

    The bike you use to ride on 'real' roads will do fine. If you're brave/committed/insane/hardy enough
    (delete as appropriate), you can ride it through the cold months. If not--

    A) get rollers. These will, I'm told improve your bike-handling skill to no end.

    B) get a stationary trainer. These clamp onto your rear wheel and look kinda like dynamometer rigs.

    stationary bicycles have several disadvantages:

    1) You can't turn a stationary bicycle into a moving bicycle, but you can turn a moving bicycle
    into a stationary bicycle.

    2) The stationary bicycle won't fit you exactly like your 'real' bicycle, so you might find
    yourself uncomfortable, suddenly, on one or the other.

    3) Stationary bicycles are by and large designed by people who don't ride bicycles for people who
    don't ride bicycles. Awkward handlebars. Saddle height that is adjustable only in fixed
    increments. And the saddles themselves! those wide, cushy saddles are fine if your'e just doing
    a five-minute warmup before going on to something else...but if you're sitting down for an hour
    or two or three--you know, like you would on a real bike--your sit bones sink in and suddenly
    you're sitting on soft bits that were never intended to be sat upon. The resulting numbness is
    incredibly and unspeakably unpleasant.

    4) Fitness-club stationary bikes may or may not have toe straps or other foot retention devices. If
    you're used to riding with clips and straps, or with clipless shoe/pedal systems, you might find
    it far more difficult to spin as smoothly and as efficiently as you had done before.

    5) Fitness club stationary bikes lie to you. You mount up and spin like a demon. You begin to think
    in your head that you're riding like George "No Chain" Hincapie. (or, from that numbness *down
    there*, like Lance Armstrong). Then you get back on a real bike with real roads. And you're a
    mere mortal. Better to succeed honestly.

    suggestion: if you really want something to do during the off-season that doesn't involve your real
    bike (whether riding, rollers, or trainer), then I advise you have a look at the rowing machines
    (ergometers). Concept 2 seems to be the standard--set it to setting 4 and see how you feel. have
    someone who's rowed before show you how it's done and then have a go.

    -Luigi viva laeta Margareta
     
  14. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Wed, 06 Aug 2003 00:13:32 GMT, Pete Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> what is cold for you? Lots of people exersize in cold weather, XC skiers, hockey, alpinisme, ice
    >> skating, etc. Maybe you get used to it. Never bothered me.
    >
    >Yes, lots of people do. I find that as the temp gets near 40 degrees I can start to feel it, and
    >below 40 it gets pretty tough.

    One of the nice things about winter, is tht it doesn't happen all at once. It gradually starts
    getting colder, and you can get used to it if you keep up with outdoor activity.

    >How about very cold riding, where the cold air hurts the skin? Like I said, we had a bad winter,
    >and maybe two months straight of below freezing almost every day.

    You mean cold enough to make your face look like the first picture here:

    http://mudhead.uottawa.ca/~pete/bike.html

    Still, I don't particularly like riding in the winter, in spite of the fact I've been doing it 5
    days a week for the past 23 yeras. I just prefer riding a bike to commuting by bus or car. I'd
    rather ski in cold weather.

    --
    --
    LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Did you know that 86% of North Americans cannot taste the difference between
    fried dog and fried cat?
     
  15. On 6 Aug 2003 16:08:04 -0700, [email protected] (Luigi de Guzman) wrote:

    >2) The stationary bicycle won't fit you exactly like your 'real' bicycle, so you might find
    > yourself uncomfortable, suddenly, on one or the other.
    >
    >3) Stationary bicycles are by and large designed by people who don't ride bicycles for people who
    > don't ride bicycles.
    >
    >4) Fitness-club stationary bikes may or may not have toe straps or other foot retention devices.
    >

    You've obviously never seen a Giant Tempo. <G>

    The Tempo can accept your saddle, your pedals, and adjust in just about every direction. The
    adjustments include saddle height, saddle distance from bb, handlebar height, and handlebar reach.

    The Tempo can be set up as a fixie or with any standard BMX freewheel.

    _Any_ 9/16" pedal fits it, I installed Speedplay X pedals on mine. SPD style and toe straps are
    included. If you don't like the cranks, it's an ISIS bb, so you can install different lengths or
    brands that suit you.

    This bike is heavy enough that I can stand on it an crank as hard as I can without flipping it, and
    I'm 6'1", 225 lbs.

    I don't have to scrape my walls or dirty my home carrying my outdoor bikes into the house, as my den
    is on the second floor.

    I also own rollers, which I use for an entirely different purpose.

    Barry
     
  16. B a r r y B u r k e J r . <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > You've obviously never seen a Giant Tempo. <G>
    >
    > The Tempo can accept your saddle, your pedals, and adjust in just about every direction. The
    > adjustments include saddle height, saddle distance from bb, handlebar height, and handlebar reach.
    >
    > The Tempo can be set up as a fixie or with any standard BMX freewheel.
    >
    > _Any_ 9/16" pedal fits it, I installed Speedplay X pedals on mine. SPD style and toe straps are
    > included. If you don't like the cranks, it's an ISIS bb, so you can install different lengths or
    > brands that suit you.
    >
    > This bike is heavy enough that I can stand on it an crank as hard as I can without flipping it,
    > and I'm 6'1", 225 lbs.
    >
    > I don't have to scrape my walls or dirty my home carrying my outdoor bikes into the house, as my
    > den is on the second floor.

    Impressive. Still a bit of an indulgence if your cycling cash is limited, though...

    >
    > I also own rollers, which I use for an entirely different purpose.

    Curling your hair?

    -Luigi

    >
    > Barry
     
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