Steamed Potatoes & Recipe

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Serendipity, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. Serendipity

    Serendipity Guest

    This was a new one for me despite using the steam method for many
    vegetables. I've always boiled potatoes for mashed or salads. I was
    watching Michael Smith At Home and he steamed the potatoes saying the
    texture was better steamed than boiled. So I tried it using potatoes
    cut in half for a deep fried potatoes. The result was considerably
    better than boiling!

    Deep Fried Potatoes
    (I don't care for regular french fries but like these occasionally)
    Select small whole potatoes or cut larger ones into quarters if really
    large or halves for medium size potatoes. Whole potatoes are the best.
    Peel. Steam (or boil) potatoes until soft. Allow to drain if boiled.
    Heat deep fryer to french fry setting. Deep fry potatoes until
    golden. Remove from fryer and season with seasoning salt or seasoning
    of your choice.
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    Serendipity wrote:
    > [snip]>
    > Deep Fried Potatoes
    > (I don't care for regular french fries but like these occasionally)
    > Select small whole potatoes or cut larger ones into quarters if
    > really large or halves for medium size potatoes. Whole potatoes
    > are the best. Peel. Steam (or boil) potatoes until soft. Allow to
    > drain if boiled. Heat deep fryer to french fry setting. Deep fry
    > potatoes until golden. Remove from fryer and season with seasoning
    > salt or seasoning of your choice.


    Sounds interesting. I also like the twice-fried method. Deep fry raw
    potato strips at moderate temp until lightly golden. Remove and let
    cool. Raise the heat of the oil to about 370°F and fry them again
    until they're the color you like. This gives you a crisp and crunchy
    exterior with a fluffy interior.

    But I admit that the most common fries in our house come from an
    Ore-Ida bag and are baked in the toaster oven with no additional oil.
    Lots of black pepper, the salt that comes with 'em.

    -aem
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Serendipity <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This was a new one for me despite using the steam method for many
    > vegetables. I've always boiled potatoes for mashed or salads. I was
    > watching Michael Smith At Home and he steamed the potatoes saying the
    > texture was better steamed than boiled. So I tried it using potatoes
    > cut in half for a deep fried potatoes. The result was considerably
    > better than boiling!


    Take a batch of those small potatoes called "creamers" -- golf ball size
    or smaller.

    Cut in half (the way that exposes the most flesh) or in quarters if
    larger. Steam, covered, until done through, tested with a toothpick.

    Melt a tablespoon or two of butter in a non-stick skillet and place the
    taters in the butter, cut sides down. Cook over medium high heat until
    the surface is nicely brown and crispy. We like them quite dark.

    Makes a good side dish.

    ISaac
     
  4. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    Serendipity wrote:
    > [snip]>
    > Deep Fried Potatoes
    > (I don't care for regular french fries but like these occasionally)
    > Select small whole potatoes or cut larger ones into quarters if
    > really large or halves for medium size potatoes. Whole potatoes
    > are the best. Peel. Steam (or boil) potatoes until soft. Allow to
    > drain if boiled. Heat deep fryer to french fry setting. Deep fry
    > potatoes until golden. Remove from fryer and season with seasoning
    > salt or seasoning of your choice.


    Sounds interesting. I also like the twice-fried method. Deep fry raw
    potato strips at moderate temp until lightly golden. Remove and let
    cool. Raise the heat of the oil to about 370°F and fry them again
    until they're the color you like. This gives you a crisp and crunchy
    exterior with a fluffy interior.

    But I admit that the most common fries in our house come from an
    Ore-Ida bag and are baked in the toaster oven with no additional oil.
    Lots of black pepper, the salt that comes with 'em.

    -aem

    Making french fries requires a two-step cooking method. First step is at a
    relatively low temp, if deep frying. This is my gripe. If you deep fry at
    temps less then 350, the oil can soak into the food. But the boiling
    method, which I never would have thought of, would replace that low-temp oil
    step.

    Hmmm...Where my copy of Florence Tyler's English fish and chips recipe. The
    boiling or steaming method makes french fries almost healthy!

    Bret



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  5. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "Isaac Wingfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Serendipity <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> This was a new one for me despite using the steam method for many
    >> vegetables. I've always boiled potatoes for mashed or salads. I was
    >> watching Michael Smith At Home and he steamed the potatoes saying the
    >> texture was better steamed than boiled. So I tried it using potatoes
    >> cut in half for a deep fried potatoes. The result was considerably
    >> better than boiling!

    >
    > Take a batch of those small potatoes called "creamers" -- golf ball size
    > or smaller.
    >
    > Cut in half (the way that exposes the most flesh) or in quarters if
    > larger. Steam, covered, until done through, tested with a toothpick.
    >
    > Melt a tablespoon or two of butter in a non-stick skillet and place the
    > taters in the butter, cut sides down. Cook over medium high heat until
    > the surface is nicely brown and crispy. We like them quite dark.
    >
    > Makes a good side dish.
    >
    > ISaac


    Ok, I'm getting extremely hungry now! And I do NOT have any potatoes on
    hand at all. SHIT! I'm firing my grocery buyer! Wait. That's me. MY
    BAD! *Mental note. Buy potatoes!*

    I just thought of something. This method will also work to make great
    hashbrowns, right?

    Bret



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