Stearing linkages

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Michael F. Harr, Feb 20, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone there in cyberland had any
    problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring to are on both of my
    bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is a real soft spot in terms
    of engineering design.
    --
    Mike
     
    Tags:


  2. Skip

    Skip Guest

    I've ridden a Vanguard for 11 or 12 years and it's bullet proof. Don't worry about it just ride it.
    I have no knowledge of the Burley.

    "Michael F. Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone there in cyberland had
    > any problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring to are on both
    > of my bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is a real soft
    > spot in terms
    of
    > engineering design.
    > --
    > Mike
     
  3. Richard Ryan

    Richard Ryan Guest

    "Michael F. Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone there in cyberland had
    > any problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring to are on both
    > of my bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is a real soft
    > spot in terms
    of
    > engineering design.
    > --
    > Mike
    >
    In the event of a low speed accident where the wheel gets forced to the right it will cause the
    steering rod to get jammed against the head tube, this can cause the rod end bearing to bend at the
    threaded part of it where it threads into the steering rod. The result can be a crack that's not
    obvious and can cause it to break in use. We had this happen on two bikes that I know of. One was a
    case of the owner letting a friend ride the bike who had a minor accident and didn't tell the owner.
    We also had a case where the bike shop that assembled the bike adjusted the steering by backing the
    rod end bearing out so far that there was only 1 or 2 threads holding it in place, it tore out of
    the steering rod the first time the customer rode the bike. I had designed a fix for this problem
    but never got around to implementing it before I sold the company. The rod end bearings should last
    for a long time, we have bikes out there with 100,000 miles on them.

    Dick Ryan
     
  4. Dick You wrote: I had designed a fix for this problem but never got around to implementing it before
    I sold the company. This begs the question...did you ever make the "Fix" available to any other
    company (after) you sold your company? I have bent a few rods in my day and I do worry sometimes
    about a loss of steering. Perhaps (IF) other companies have not yet addressed this problem, you
    could sell your "Fix" idea?
    ----------------------------------------------------
    "richard ryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Michael F. Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone
    there
    > > in cyberland had any problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring
    > > to are on both of my bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is
    > > a real soft spot in terms
    > of
    > > engineering design.
    > > --
    > > Mike
    > >
    > In the event of a low speed accident where the wheel gets forced to the right it will cause the
    > steering rod to get jammed against the head tube, this can cause the rod end bearing to bend at
    > the threaded part of it
    where
    > it threads into the steering rod. The result can be a crack that's not obvious and can cause it to
    > break in use. We had this happen on two bikes that I know of. One was a case of the owner letting
    > a friend ride the bike who had a minor accident and didn't tell the owner. We also had a case
    where
    > the bike shop that assembled the bike adjusted the steering by backing the rod end bearing out so
    > far that there was only 1 or 2 threads holding it
    in
    > place, it tore out of the steering rod the first time the customer rode
    the
    > bike. I had designed a fix for this problem but never got around to implementing it before I sold
    > the company. The rod end bearings should
    last
    > for a long time, we have bikes out there with 100,000 miles on them.
    >
    > Dick Ryan
    >
     
  5. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    I ride a Longbikes' built and Ryan designed Vanguard with 25,000 miles in five years (this is the
    beginning of my sixth year). I have had no problems with my steering linkage. I do attend to it as I
    attend to all potential single failure catastrophes.

    I noticed somebody's Vanguard with a kink evident in the end of the steering tube from an excursion
    as described by Mr. Ryan.

    A friend that rides a Ryan Vanguard complained once of losing the forward rod end nut/bolt. We
    discussed pinning the bolt. I have and will continue to use a ny-lock nut and aircraft grade rod
    end bearings.

    I change the two bearings in the steering/handlebar mount assemble at each annual inspection. I
    changed the 5/16" steering assy bolt from the common grade bolt to Grade-8 (marked not tested) in my
    first year. This bolt takes bending stresses from the barend extensions and the original common
    grade bolt failed under controlled conditions due to bending fatigue.

    I recently upgraded to Longbikes' hornless & hip-jointed seat frame. I have an essentially new
    seat-mesh and a used/repairable mesh for the horn-ed style seat frame available in the name of good
    fellowship for the cost of shipping.

    "richard ryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > In the event of a low speed accident where the wheel gets forced to the right it will cause the
    > steering rod to get jammed against the head tube, this can cause the rod end bearing to bend at
    > the threaded part of it
    where
    > it threads into the steering rod. The result can be a crack that's not obvious and can cause it to
    > break in use. We had this happen on two bikes that I know of. One was a case of the owner letting
    > a friend ride the bike who had a minor accident and didn't tell the owner. We also had a case
    where
    > the bike shop that assembled the bike adjusted the steering by backing the rod end bearing out so
    > far that there was only 1 or 2 threads holding it
    in
    > place, it tore out of the steering rod the first time the customer rode
    the
    > bike. I had designed a fix for this problem but never got around to implementing it before I sold
    > the company. The rod end bearings should
    last
    > for a long time, we have bikes out there with 100,000 miles on them.
    >
    > Dick Ryan
    >
     
  6. Gene Cosloy

    Gene Cosloy Guest

    "Michael F. Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone there in cyberland had any
    > problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring to are on both of my
    > bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is a real soft spot in
    > terms of engineering design.
    Under what circumstances did the linkage break and where did the break occur? this appears to very
    serious if it happened while you were riding! If it was my bike I'd get in touh with Burley.

    Gene
     
  7. Mike Automobiles, airplanes, boats all have some sort of linkage that make the steering work, so
    that a bicycle has a linkage doesn't necessarily mean it is a soft spot in the design. Ryan's have
    been running well for years so no need to worry there. Burley needs, and probably wants, to know
    about this right away. Be sure to give all the facts as to what happened. Your actions may save
    someone's life. Speedy

    "Michael F. Harris" wrote:

    > I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone there in cyberland had any
    > problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring to are on both of my
    > bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is a real soft spot in
    > terms of engineering design.
    > --
    > Mike

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  8. Chris Broome

    Chris Broome Guest

    Hi Mike,

    "Michael F. Harris" wrote:
    >
    > I have a Ryan Vanguard and a Burley Limbo. I was wondering if anyone there in cyberland had any
    > problems with the steering linkages breaking. The linkages I am referring to are on both of my
    > bents. Recently the linkage broke on my Limbo. It seems to me that this is a real soft spot in
    > terms of engineering design.
    > --

    It's a spot in the design, but I don't think it is any softer than any other spot.

    I rode a cable-linked Infinity for about 8 years.

    Due to my own negligence during maintenance, one cable once came loose. I just applied the rear
    brakes, stopped easily and then securely installed the retaining clip I had previously overlooked.

    Not a big deal, but it could have been nasty on a hill or in heavy traffic. But I could have also
    overlooked many other parts on the bike and endangered myself.

    I strongly suspect that steering linkages are more troublefree than many other components on
    recumbents.

    -- Chris Broome HPVA
     
  9. Richard Ryan

    Richard Ryan Guest

    Another problem that should be mentioned! On a few older bikes we had a problem with the stainless
    steel standoff that the aluminum steering assembly pivots on seizing up. This caused the assembly to
    then rotate around the bolt and in at least one case caused the bolt to fail. If anyone should
    experience the steering showing signs of binding you should dissasemble it and take out the pivot,
    find some one with a lathe and relieve the center of the standoff, leave about 1/2" of contact area
    on either end. Make sure the inside of the aluminum part is clean (scotchbrite works as good as
    anything) and grease.

    Paul Bruneau and Bob Krzewinski have just put up a Ryan owner's web site http://ryanownersclub.com
    They did a really nice job on it!

    Dick Ryan
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - Stearing linkages
  1. Demtro
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,008
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...