step stride pace ?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by MIKE, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. MIKE

    MIKE Guest

    Step - stride - pace - which is which ?

    To me, the distance between the fall of one foot then the fall of the other
    foot is a step, and the distance between the fall of one foot and the next
    fall of the same foot is a stride or pace. Does any body agree ?

    I only ask because the instructions for a pedometer i've been give seem to
    treat step and stride as the same thing

    Mike
    www.mikes-walks.co.uk
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    MIKE wrote:
    > Step - stride - pace - which is which ?


    I don't think there's a rigid definition. The trick is knowing what
    works for you, and how long it is.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "MIKE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Step - stride - pace - which is which ?
    >
    > To me, the distance between the fall of one foot then the fall of the other
    > foot is a step, and the distance between the fall of one foot and the next
    > fall of the same foot is a stride or pace. Does any body agree ?


    I don't want to make a pronouncement on "stride", but your understanding of
    "step" and "pace" is correct.

    Pace comes from the Latin word with the same meaning. A Roman pace was about 5
    of our feet, and the word "mile" comes from "mille passus", a thousand paces.

    Curiously, modern Italian took the word "mile" back from english as "miglio", so
    that the modern race in Italy over a thousand miles is called the "mille
    miglia".

    > I only ask because the instructions for a pedometer i've been give seem to
    > treat step and stride as the same thing


    Someone will be along in a minute to tell you that all language is relative and
    it doesn't matter what you call something as long as everyone knows what you
    mean.
    --
    Mark South, Super Genius: World Citizen, Net Denizen
     
  4. John Dawson

    John Dawson Guest

    On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 10:34:29 +0100, "MIKE" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Step - stride - pace - which is which ?
    >
    >To me, the distance between the fall of one foot then the fall of the other
    >foot is a step, and the distance between the fall of one foot and the next
    >fall of the same foot is a stride or pace. Does any body agree ?
    >
    >I only ask because the instructions for a pedometer i've been give seem to
    >treat step and stride as the same thing


    Collins dictionary gives a definition of stride as a long step or
    pace. Not even the OED suggests it is more than one step.

    John D.
    --
    at home in Kendal, Cumbria
    Lake District Walks at: http://www.lakedistrictwalks.com/
    Kilimanjaro trip at: http://www.lakedistrictwalks.com/kilimanjaro/
     
  5. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > MIKE wrote:
    > > Step - stride - pace - which is which ?

    >
    > I don't think there's a rigid definition. The trick is knowing what
    > works for you, and how long it is.


    As I already explained, the Romans were pretty clear on what a pace is.

    Unless you want to believe what the guy I once encountered in the pub did, that
    a Roman mile was less than 1000 yards.
    --
    "As for the hexamine stove. OW! Burnt fingers again!..... and the
    bloody thing's gone out.....OW! no it hasn't." - Judith in uk.rec.walking
     
  6. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from "Mark South" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > > > Step - stride - pace - which is which ?

    > >
    > > I don't think there's a rigid definition. The trick is knowing what
    > > works for you, and how long it is.


    > As I already explained, the Romans were pretty clear on what a pace is.


    > Unless you want to believe what the guy I once encountered in the pub
    > did, that
    > a Roman mile was less than 1000 yards.


    The Romans were pretty clear what they meant by decimation as well but
    that hasn't stopped the normal usage turning the proportions pretty much
    on their head.

    I would go some way to support Mark. One of my dictionaries defines pace
    both ways ("1 a a single step in walking or running. b the distance
    covered in this (about 75 cm or 30 in.). c the distance between two
    successive stationary positions of the same foot in walking." Stride as
    a single long step (or cross with one step) and step (confusingly) as "1
    a the complete movement of one leg in walking or running (took a step
    forward). b the distance covered by this."

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year 39 summits
    New - 22 (Marilyns 8, Sweats 5, Outlying Fells 11)
    Repeats - 17( Marilyns 6, Sweats 12, Wainwrights 11)
    Knackered knee - 4 times
     
  7. Step refers to getting into or out of the car on the way to the hills.
    Pace is what most of us do while walking.
    Stride is what Roger does while taking things easy.

    HTH

    Simon
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    Simon Caldwell <[email protected]> wrote
    >Step refers to getting into or out of the car on the way to the hills.
    >

    Stumble in my case.

    >Pace is what most of us do while walking.


    Saunter in my case.

    >Stride is what Roger does while taking things easy.
    >

    Run alongside out of breath in my case.
    --
    Gordon
     
  9. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Simon Caldwell <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Step refers to getting into or out of the car on the way to the hills.
    > Pace is what most of us do while walking.
    > Stride is what Roger does while taking things easy.


    Nah. Stride is what I do when vainly trying to keep pace with David.

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year 39 summits
    New - 22 (Marilyns 8, Sweats 5, Outlying Fells 11)
    Repeats - 17( Marilyns 6, Sweats 12, Wainwrights 11)
    Knackered knee - 4 times
     
  10. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Roger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The message <[email protected]>
    > from "Mark South" <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >
    > > > > Step - stride - pace - which is which ?
    > > >
    > > > I don't think there's a rigid definition. The trick is knowing what
    > > > works for you, and how long it is.

    >
    > > As I already explained, the Romans were pretty clear on what a pace is.

    >
    > > Unless you want to believe what the guy I once encountered in the pub
    > > did, that a Roman mile was less than 1000 yards.

    >
    > The Romans were pretty clear what they meant by decimation as well but
    > that hasn't stopped the normal usage turning the proportions pretty much
    > on their head.


    The _enormity_ of the change is impressive ;-)

    Yeah, I can think of a newsgroup or two that could do with a jolly good
    decimation :)

    Even in the old sense it would still be kind of fun.

    > I would go some way to support Mark.


    Stepping or pacing? :)

    > One of my dictionaries defines pace
    > both ways ("1 a a single step in walking or running. b the distance
    > covered in this (about 75 cm or 30 in.). c the distance between two
    > successive stationary positions of the same foot in walking."


    Dictionaries have difficulty with the idea of different words meaning different
    things.

    > Stride as
    > a single long step (or cross with one step) and step (confusingly) as "1
    > a the complete movement of one leg in walking or running (took a step
    > forward). b the distance covered by this."


    The scientist in me is cringing at the way the definitions appear precise yet
    merely defer the definition to other undefined terms.

    Not that this is even important, but hey, .uk group.
    --
    Mark South, Super Genius: World Citizen, Net Denizen
     
  11. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 08:05:14 +0100, Roger wrote:

    >The message <[email protected]>
    >from Simon Caldwell <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >
    >> Step refers to getting into or out of the car on the way to the hills.
    >> Pace is what most of us do while walking.
    >> Stride is what Roger does while taking things easy.

    >
    >Nah. Stride is what I do when vainly trying to keep pace with David.


    TDO and I just whip out the camera and make the blighters wait!
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  12. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from "Mark South" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > > > > > Step - stride - pace - which is which ?
    > > > >
    > > > > I don't think there's a rigid definition. The trick is knowing what
    > > > > works for you, and how long it is.

    > >
    > > > As I already explained, the Romans were pretty clear on what a pace is.

    > >
    > > > Unless you want to believe what the guy I once encountered in the pub
    > > > did, that a Roman mile was less than 1000 yards.

    > >
    > > The Romans were pretty clear what they meant by decimation as well but
    > > that hasn't stopped the normal usage turning the proportions pretty much
    > > on their head.


    > The _enormity_ of the change is impressive ;-)


    > Yeah, I can think of a newsgroup or two that could do with a jolly good
    > decimation :)


    > Even in the old sense it would still be kind of fun.


    > > I would go some way to support Mark.


    > Stepping or pacing? :)


    I am probably more in step with you than I thought but the remark was
    aimed at the meaning of 'pace'.

    > > One of my dictionaries defines pace
    > > both ways ("1 a a single step in walking or running. b the distance
    > > covered in this (about 75 cm or 30 in.). c the distance between two
    > > successive stationary positions of the same foot in walking."


    > Dictionaries have difficulty with the idea of different words meaning
    > different
    > things.


    Words that have different meanings in different areas are not generally
    a problem. Words that mean different things in the same area - such as
    'step' and 'pace' are a barrier to clear communication.

    > > Stride as
    > > a single long step (or cross with one step) and step (confusingly) as "1
    > > a the complete movement of one leg in walking or running (took a step
    > > forward). b the distance covered by this."


    > The scientist in me is cringing at the way the definitions appear
    > precise yet
    > merely defer the definition to other undefined terms.


    As a former engineer I can sympathize. :)

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year 39 summits
    New - 22 (Marilyns 8, Sweats 5, Outlying Fells 11)
    Repeats - 17( Marilyns 6, Sweats 12, Wainwrights 11)
    Knackered knee - 4 times
     
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