Sticker glue/grease removal??

  • Thread starter Hell and High Water
  • Start date



N

n5hsr

Guest
"Bill Baka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> n5hsr wrote:
>> "Bill Baka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>> My dad lived in Arkansas and if he wanted a 6 pack of beer he had to
>>> drive to the next county. Wet, dry, etc. The good old boy sheriffs sat
>>> at the county line and stopped everybody and checked their trunks for
>>> anything over a 6 pack, which was then called smuggling.
>>> ****,
>>> You are stupid.
>>> Bill Baka

>>
>> I'm almost afraid to ask which dry county. I lived in both Craighead and
>> Clark for a while, both dry and on Friday nights there was practically a
>> line of cars to the next wet county. I also lived in Phillips county
>> for a while, but they are 'wet'. So the bums in Craighead used to drink
>> Dr. Tischnor's. I ought to know, my dad's store couldn't keep it in
>> stock. Clark had a line through Hot Springs county (also dry) to Garland
>> (i.e. Hot Springs city) and the infamous Ship And Shore Liquor.
>> Considering the fact I went to a Baptist college in a dry county, there
>> were an awful large number of beer cans in various places around the
>> apartment building after a weekend. . . .
>>
>> Charles of Schaumburg

> Clark county. His neighbor was a deputy sheriff in charge of watching the
> town/county jail over night and always came home drunk in the morning.
> Seem the evidence room was the police personal stash room since they never
> prosecuted anybody. Even the moonshiners they knew just had to hand over a
> few gallons of the good stuff and the police would leave and sat "See ya
> next month". I liked beer in that hot weather when I visited so I had to
> go through the same routine as my dad. Now, it would be about $20 of gas
> per six pack with my old Econoline van that I used for vacation trips.
> That was a far to the south as I ever cared to go, since with each state
> farther east the cops turned into classic southern tv types. I got stopped
> at the state line and the cop there called me "Boy" and I was 34 at the
> time. More than enough southern hospitality for me.
> Bill Baka


Clark County is where I went to college in Arkadelphia. There was the
infamous Beer Trail up the 7 to Ship and Shore in Garland county.

Nice thing about being a ham in the south is the cops usually leave you
alone. Especially since the hams help the cops when the weather is bad.
And they get a lot of tornadoes in Arkansas.

Charles of Schaumburg
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
n5hsr wrote:
> "Bill Baka" <[email protected]> wrote in message


>> Clark county. His neighbor was a deputy sheriff in charge of watching the
>> town/county jail over night and always came home drunk in the morning.
>> Seem the evidence room was the police personal stash room since they never
>> prosecuted anybody. Even the moonshiners they knew just had to hand over a
>> few gallons of the good stuff and the police would leave and sat "See ya
>> next month". I liked beer in that hot weather when I visited so I had to
>> go through the same routine as my dad. Now, it would be about $20 of gas
>> per six pack with my old Econoline van that I used for vacation trips.
>> That was a far to the south as I ever cared to go, since with each state
>> farther east the cops turned into classic southern tv types. I got stopped
>> at the state line and the cop there called me "Boy" and I was 34 at the
>> time. More than enough southern hospitality for me.
>> Bill Baka

>
> Clark County is where I went to college in Arkadelphia. There was the
> infamous Beer Trail up the 7 to Ship and Shore in Garland county.
>
> Nice thing about being a ham in the south is the cops usually leave you
> alone. Especially since the hams help the cops when the weather is bad.
> And they get a lot of tornadoes in Arkansas.
>
> Charles of Schaumburg


Tornadoes I know about. There were some gawd awful thunder storms while
I was there and some mini tornadoes but no big ones. The next year I
heard from my dad that a big one went through his place and removed his
barn and the front porch of his house. He said he didn't lose anything
important but I had my National Geographic collection stored in his barn
and he told me that it made a trail of magazines for miles until the
twister ran out of steam. He was going to tear the barn down anyway but
the twister got him insurance money to start a new house on the property.
He was kind of happy, I wasn't.
Bill (OT again) Baka