Still looking for 26x2 inch slicks

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by lectraplayer, Feb 2, 2015.

  1. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I'm looking for something fast but wide for street and trail. I'm wanting to stay around 2 inches wide, but I think 1.5 inches may still do me decent on push roads and occasional forest clutter. I cannot go over 2.1 inches wide. However, I would like to stay on the wide side to handle a bit of cargo, as well as my clydesdale duff. (I also like the look of my meaty mountain bike tires) While I keep hearing about Big Apples and other baloon tires, will they handle the 60 to 100 PSI I am running to hasten the roll?
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Rolling resistance depends on more than pressure only. Tire suppleness play a big part of it. Thick sidewalls and a thick tread surface(whether it's treaded or not) can cause fairly high rolling resistance even at high pressures.

    If you want a wide tire with low rolling resistance, look at something like Conti Speed King/Race King, in the Black Chili compound. For urban riding, not much puncture protection. For trail riding, ripping the sidewall open is a distinct possibility. But they roll like you wouldn't believe.
    The knobs are fairly low, so they handle OK on roads. And with the soft compound, they'll wear smooth fast enough if you stay on the blacktop.
    Or hit them with an orbital sander and you'll be done in maybe 20 minutes. In a cloud of black dust...
     
  3. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    Looking at the Contis, I'm finding an unusuauly high number of busted butts being reported, especially to be a soft compound. Are they really that slick or are these people riding stupid? I would expect "soft" to also be "sticky." I have gotten a Specialized Fatboy (the last www.bobsbikes.com had) and it has some possibility. I also had Specialized Hemispheres on a bike that got stolen, but I don't see them now in store. I am seeing a couple possibilities from Bontrager, but don't know how they roll.
     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    The contis are available in different compounds, and the standard one is a fair bit less grippy than the Black Chili. Not that you'd notice under good conditions, but definitely noticeable on wet rock.
    The tread pattern is shallow, so they also won't do well in soft conditions.
    But foremost I suspect that if you buy a race-spec (meaning extra expensive, extra short lived) it'd make sense to expect such a rider to push harder and crashing more often.
     
  5. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    Most complaints I'm finding are busted butts on dry, flat pavement at lower speeds. Could there be something else?
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. I think that if you want to use a narrower tire than a 26x2.1 then you may want to consider retrofitting your 26er with either 700c or 650b wheels-and-tires ...

    Of course, there are innumerable 700c tire treads which (in my mind) still makes 700c the better option ...

    With the following example (again!!!), 700c wheels/tires were installed in a vintage (no disc brake mounts!) 26er Hardtail frame which was mated to a standard 700c Carbon Fiber fork ...

    [sharedmedia=gallery:images:8564]​

    Because the Moongoose frame which is pictured does not have disc brake mounts AND because the larger rims do not allow the use of the existing cantilever brake mounts, I needed to mount a long reach ROAD brake caliper to the frame's fender mounting hole which is located on the seat stays. With a 650b rim, simply moving the brake pad to the TOP of the adjusting slot may-or-may-not create a good-to-go situation.

    Unfortunately, I think that many ROAD FORKs can still only handle a 700x25 tire ... so, choose any unauthorized combinations with an open eye.

    Note, too, that I have mounted a ROAD crankset (pictured with a 52/39 Chainring combination ... currently, the particular frame has a 53/39 Chainring combination).

    Simply using a crank which can use a larger outer chainring may give you the gearing combination & feel that you are looking for while using your current 26x2.1 tires.
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Oops!?!

    Attached is a picture of the 26er Hardtail (Moongoose) frame which is outfitted with 700c wheels/tires (as it appeared a few years ago) to which I am referring in the previous post which didn't seem to embed properly.
     

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  8. westmixxin

    westmixxin New Member

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    is not necessarily going to be an easy task is not something that you come by too often but realistically I think you will be able to find it as long as you go to the proper websites theres some good information so far so I would go with these guys advise.
     
  9. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I'm still looking, and the Bontrager Hank 26x2.2 inchers are looking tempting. However, I am wondering if that would be too wide. I may have to get one just to try out. I'm seeing some great reviews out of it. However, it has been reported to be easy to puncture. (Something to keep in mind) ...but will the 60A compound be too soft?

    What hardness is most tires?
     
  10. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    I put the Hank on the rear of this bike, and a Fatboy on the front. Stay tuned...
     
  11. lectraplayer

    lectraplayer Member

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    The Hank 26x2.2 is too wide and rubs on the rear frame of all my bikes. However, it goes well on the front. As noted, there appears to only be one layer of cording in the sidewalls, and gashes are easily created.
     
  12. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I think that most MTB frames will accept a 26x2.2 tire ...

    Again, posting pictures of the bikes will probably expedite receiving suitable answers ...
     
  13. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    2 inch slicks will ride hard at high pressure. They may also be kind of heavy depending on the type you buy. The weight of the tire is noticeable during acceleration.

    They sometimes have a pretty thick tread cap that can make them feel a little dead and may cause plenty of rolling resistance due to hysteresis.

    I wish they'd build a 2 inch slick with a build like a racing tire.

    The Schwalbe site lists some of the specs of the tire. I think some of their 2 inch tires come in a lightweight version with a higher thread count.
     
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