Stinky gloves



N

Naqerj

Guest
D.M. Procida wrote:
> My cycling gloves *stink*. They are truly disgusting, a sour vinegary
> bacterial olfactory factory. The label says not to wash them - but if I
> don't get them cleaned I will have to throw them away.
>
> They're Lidl's £1.99 a pair specials, so I guess I can afford to throw
> them away if I absolutely have to,


Ah, but the problem is not how much they cost, but how much the
replacement pair costs if you can't wait until next time Lidl have them
on offer.

--
Andrew
 
N

Naqerj

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:

>
> Generally, yes. Real leather ones benefit from being hand washed, but
> your average track mitt can be thrown in with the rest. Although my
> favourite black Alturas are, after dozens of machine washes, somewhat
> less black than they were.
>

Talking of real leather ones, I always used to stock up on Decathlon's
cheapest track mitts when I went on Holiday to France. This year, I
noticed they've stopped selling the ones made from dead goats and
they're all synthetic now.

--
Andrew
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
> "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]>typed
>> The worst that can happen is that you ruin a pair of gloves which are
>> already ruined :)

>
> The worst is when the Velcro eats up and ruins some *other*
> serviceable garment...


Fasten all Velcro stuff to try and prevent that.

I also hate it when the rubbery leg gripper stuff comes off shorts and
ends up firmly stuck all over my cotton t-shirts. At least I think that's
what the stuff is! :)

Fortunately, the latest Lusso shorts have a different type of leg gripper
that doesn't disintegrate. Incidentally, Wiggle seemed to have changed
their minds about dropping Lusso.

~PB
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
D.M. Procida wrote:
> So I think I will do them by hand, but the problem remains - does this
> happen to all gloves? Can gloves generally speaking be chucked in the
> machine with one's socks?


Real leather ones can end up shrunk & dry if you're not very careful, but
just about every other sort can be washed without any special care.

~PB
 
M

Mark Thompson

Guest
> Wash 'em and find out. A new pair will cost you less than a pint (London
> prices).


Ha! I got charged £2.20 for an _ale_[1] and that was up north. Inflation
has a lot to answer for.

[1] and it was **** :-/
 
C

congokid

Guest
In message <[email protected]>, Mark
Thompson <[email protected]> writes
>> Wash 'em and find out. A new pair will cost you less than a pint (London
>> prices).

>
>Ha! I got charged £2.20 for an _ale_[1] and that was up north. Inflation
>has a lot to answer for.
>
>[1] and it was **** :-/


Ooh, bad luck. Dodgy pint.

--
congokid
Good restaurants in London? Number one on Google
http://congokid.com
 
A

Arthur Clune

Guest
Pete Biggs wrote:
>
> Real leather ones can end up shrunk & dry if you're not very careful, but
> just about every other sort can be washed without any special care.


Mine are real leather and I just bung them in the washing machine. The trick
is to put them on while they are still wet to stretch them. Then bung them
back to dry. Even without that though I find they are ok again after wearing
them for 10 mins or so.

--
Arthur Clune
 

Keeff57

New Member
Jun 25, 2005
22
0
0
Arthur Clune said:
Pete Biggs wrote:
>
> Real leather ones can end up shrunk & dry if you're not very careful, but
> just about every other sort can be washed without any special care.


My routine is to

1. Wash them in hand hot water in the sink, using plenty of washing up liquid.

2. Rinse them 3 or 4 times in cold water to make sure all the detergent is out.

3. Let them soak for 5 minutes in a sink of cold water with a thimble of bleach added. This will make sure that all the bacteria from your sweaty paws is dead.

If you miss out the bleach stage, then you will probably find they get stinky again after you wear them once.

A 40C machine wash does not kill the bacteria in your clothes. You need 65C or more to kill the little b...s. The 40C wash neatly distributes the bugs among all your best togs. Have your friends been avoiding you lately? This is probably why

Most of your cycling kit would probably benefit from cleaning in this way.


Keith
 
A

Arthur Clune

Guest
Keeff57 wrote:

>>
>> A 40C machine wash does not kill the bacteria in your clothes. You
>> need 65C or more to kill the little b...s. The 40C wash neatly
>> distributes the bugs among all your best togs. Have your friends been
>> avoiding you lately? This is probably why
>>
>> Most of your cycling kit would probably benefit from cleaning in this
>> way.


Most of your cycling kit would shink if washed at 60C. Most of mine says
30C only, so strictly my washing it at 40C is pushing it a little.

--
Arthur Clune
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Arthur Clune wrote:
> Keeff57 wrote:
>
> >>
> >> A 40C machine wash does not kill the bacteria in your clothes. You
> >> need 65C or more to kill the little b...s. The 40C wash neatly
> >> distributes the bugs among all your best togs. Have your friends been
> >> avoiding you lately? This is probably why
> >>
> >> Most of your cycling kit would probably benefit from cleaning in this
> >> way.

>
> Most of your cycling kit would shink if washed at 60C. Most of mine says
> 30C only, so strictly my washing it at 40C is pushing it a little.


And ever tried measuring your skin temperature when you stop at the top
of a climb on a baking hot still summers day? 30 degrees is a load of
CYA rubbish.

Washing at higher temperatures (up to 60) will potentially harm the
finish of some exotic synthetic fabrics, ie its screen printing and
colour fastness. Unless you are including wool in the mix, it is
unlikely to damage synthetics/cotton/linen to any significant amount.
Chuck it all (except wool) through on a colourfast cottons wash at 50
and it will do fine as long as you don't mind potential decolouration
(nothing worse than the stains it'll pick up from the road dirt or
fading from the sun) and don't include wool.

Tumble drying OTOH is potentially harmful for many synthetics if you
overdo it as they will get hot and melt, doing nasty invisible things
like sealing up coolmax fibres and damaging the finish. I like my
cotton tumble dried till it smells like it is about to catch fire, but
the synthetics are best just drip dried on an airer (after a really
good spin). Leaving clothes in the sun on a hot summers day will
rapidly exceed the stated wash temperatures.

Wool OTOH should be treated with the utmost respect unless it is
preshrunk and felted (like a tradiional guernsey sweater). We have a
very nice dolls jumper that was originally just right for a two year
old before it crept into the wrong wash heap.. I am at a loss to think
of any non-wool fibres that are used in cycle clothing that will shrink
on a 60 degree wash.

Being a cheapskate who until recently had been using the same winter
cycling jacket for nearly twenty years (bought in 88!) and seem to keep
things going for a good length of time despite being quite hard wearing
on clothes, I am not in the business of destroying things for the sake
of it.

...d
 
H

Helen Deborah Vecht

Guest
[email protected] (Arthur Clune)typed


> Keeff57 wrote:


> >>
> >> A 40C machine wash does not kill the bacteria in your clothes. You
> >> need 65C or more to kill the little b...s. The 40C wash neatly
> >> distributes the bugs among all your best togs. Have your friends been
> >> avoiding you lately? This is probably why
> >>
> >> Most of your cycling kit would probably benefit from cleaning in this
> >> way.


> Most of your cycling kit would shink if washed at 60C. Most of mine says
> 30C only, so strictly my washing it at 40C is pushing it a little.


It's not just shrinkage; acrylic fabrics lose their softness and some
garments may lose their shape.

Some cotton *will* shrink at almost any temperature and will need to be
*r*ned to get back to size :-(

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
J

JBB

Guest
"D.M. Procida" <[email protected]> wrote in
message
news:1h318nw.1o1jxetmog7gzN%[email protected]
> John Hearns <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> > My cycling gloves *stink*. They are truly disgusting, a sour vinegary
>> > bacterial olfactory factory. The label says not to wash them - but if I
>> > don't get them cleaned I will have to throw them away.

>>
>> Put them in the washing machine.
>>
>> If you're really concerned about them, just get some washing liquid,
>> put them on your hands and wash them under a tap. Or in the shower.

>
> It's not the gloves I'm particularly worried about, but the
> washing-machine and anything else that goes for a spin with the gloves.
> And me, because I'll be dead meat if I cause a laundry disaster with my
> stinkgloves.
>
> So I think I will do them by hand, but the problem remains - does this
> happen to all gloves? Can gloves generally speaking be chucked in the
> machine with one's socks?
>
> Daniele
> --


If your worried about the velcro snaaging other washing you can always put
them in a pillow case and tie a knot in the end then bung the lot in the
washing machine.

HTH
Julia
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
>
> Some cotton *will* shrink at almost any temperature and will need to be
> *r*ned to get back to size :-(
>


What is this *r*n you speak of?

--
Tony

"I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
Anon
 
H

Helen Deborah Vecht

Guest
Tony Raven <[email protected]>typed


> Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
> >
> > Some cotton *will* shrink at almost any temperature and will need to be
> > *r*ned to get back to size :-(
> >


> What is this *r*n you speak of?


A ROTten veba!

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:
> Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
> >
> > Some cotton *will* shrink at almost any temperature and will need to be
> > *r*ned to get back to size :-(
> >

>
> What is this *r*n you speak of?


Nothing to get hot under the collar for.. I'm flat out of ideas as
well.

...d
 
M

Mark Thompson

Guest
>> What is this *r*n you speak of?
>
> Nothing to get hot under the collar for.. I'm flat out of ideas as
> well.


lol, that made me crease up.
 
T

Tom Orr

Guest
Keeff57 wrote:
>
> A 40C machine wash does not kill the bacteria in your clothes. You
> need 65C or more to kill the little b...s. The 40C wash neatly
> distributes the bugs among all your best togs. Have your friends
> been avoiding you lately? This is probably why


I think that's why hanging washing out to dry is a good thing - the sunshine
kills all the bugs.

Tom.
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
I submit that on or about Sun, 18 Sep 2005 22:11:49 +0000 (UTC), the
person known to the court as "JBB" <[email protected]> made a
statement (<[email protected]> in Your
Honour's bundle) to the following effect:

>If your worried about the velcro snaaging other washing you can always put
>them in a pillow case and tie a knot in the end then bung the lot in the
>washing machine.


Time upon a once we had a small zip-up net bag designed for the
washing of small items worn by very small people. This would do the
job just nicely, allowing as it does the free flow of water around the
contents.

Guy
--
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

"To every complex problem there is a solution which is
simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken
 
N

Nobody Here

Guest
On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 09:28:54 +0100, Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
> I submit that on or about Sun, 18 Sep 2005 22:11:49 +0000 (UTC), the
> person known to the court as "JBB" <[email protected]> made a
> statement (<[email protected]> in Your
> Honour's bundle) to the following effect:
>
>>If your worried about the velcro snaaging other washing you can always put
>>them in a pillow case and tie a knot in the end then bung the lot in the
>>washing machine.

>
> Time upon a once we had a small zip-up net bag designed for the
> washing of small items worn by very small people. This would do the
> job just nicely, allowing as it does the free flow of water around the
> contents.


Indeed, Morrisons sells them in pairs for about 89p. I use them to stop
the kid's school tights getting tangled in the rest of the washing and
laddering.

--
Nobby