Stolen Bike Sighting!

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by John Morgan, Jun 19, 2003.

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  1. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)

    Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on the
    sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so I
    quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to the
    perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who have had
    a prized bike stolen know these feelings run deep). Instead, I was determined to catch him on foot
    so I started running at him full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my footsteps and
    looked back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of recognition washed over
    his face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet. He rode down an alleyway
    and behind an apartment complex. Only then did he look back and smirk with satisfaction from his
    escape, now 30 feet away.

    I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    be beatings. Harsh and relentless beatings to the scum of society.

    Next time I will be ready.

    -John Morgan
     
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  2. Jason

    Jason Guest

    DAMN I would SO have loved it if you had caught him. I still ook for my stolen Rockhopper.. 2 years
    later. I dream of what I would do to the poor sod who is riding it. It would most definitly be
    illegal... and medieval. If only...

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    > my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    > the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    > I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    the
    > perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who have
    > had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run
    deep).
    > Instead, I was determined to catch him on foot so I started running at him full speed. When I was
    > about 15 feet away he heard my footsteps and
    looked
    > back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of recognition washed over his
    > face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet. He rode down an alleyway and
    > behind an
    apartment
    > complex. Only then did he look back and smirk with satisfaction from his escape, now 30 feet away.
    >
    > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    > through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    > be beatings. Harsh
    and
    > relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    >
    > Next time I will be ready.
    >
    > -John Morgan
     
  3. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    > my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    > the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    > I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    the
    > perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who have
    > had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run
    deep).
    > Instead, I was determined to catch him on foot so I started running at him full speed. When I was
    > about 15 feet away he heard my footsteps and
    looked
    > back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of recognition washed over his
    > face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet. He rode down an alleyway and
    > behind an
    apartment
    > complex. Only then did he look back and smirk with satisfaction from his escape, now 30 feet away.
    >
    > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    > through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    > be beatings. Harsh
    and
    > relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    >
    > Next time I will be ready.
    >
    > -John Morgan

    Dude, now you have a description of the guy - tell your friends, tell the bike shops, or if you
    think the cops will actually do something, tell them. If you want, throw in something about how he
    yelled if he sees you again he'll shoot you, or something, maybe they'll look for him then!

    Good luck on catching the perp - and kicking his ass. next time, call the cops before you run after
    him, or call some large friends who live nearby.

    Jon Bond
     
  4. I would have been laughing if he got off the bike and kicked your butt and stole your car too...
     
  5. Jason

    Jason Guest

  6. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    > my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    > the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    > I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    > the perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who
    > have had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run deep). Instead, I was determined to catch
    > him on foot so I started running at him full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my
    > footsteps and looked back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of
    > recognition washed over his face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet.
    > He rode down an alleyway and behind an apartment complex. Only then did he look back and smirk
    > with satisfaction from his escape, now 30 feet away.
    >
    > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    > through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    > be beatings. Harsh and relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    >
    > Next time I will be ready.
    >
    > -John Morgan

    This is exactly why you should always carry a pack of D size batteries in you car.....THWAP...right
    in the back of his head!
    --
    Slacker - let the ass whopping commence
     
  7. Jason

    Jason Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down
    > > around my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    > >
    > > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned
    it
    > > to) riding my bike on the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far
    lane
    > > and was unable to run him over with my car, so I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight
    > > dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    the
    > > perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind
    rage.
    > > (Any of you who have had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run
    deep).
    > > Instead, I was determined to catch him on foot so I started running at
    him
    > > full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my footsteps and
    looked
    > > back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of recognition washed over
    > > his face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet. He rode down an
    > > alleyway and behind an
    apartment
    > > complex. Only then did he look back and smirk with satisfaction from
    his
    > > escape, now 30 feet away.
    > >
    > > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    > > through, but there will be another day. He
    will
    > > slip up again and then he will be mine. There will be beatings. Harsh
    and
    > > relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    > >
    > > Next time I will be ready.
    > >
    > > -John Morgan
    >
    >
    > This is exactly why you should always carry a pack of D size batteries in
    you car.....THWAP...right in the back of his head!
    > --
    > Slacker - let the ass whopping commence
    >
    >

    LMAO wouldnt a gun be easier?
     
  8. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "Jason" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > > > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought
    my
    > > > world crashing down around my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    > > >
    > > > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned
    > it
    > > > to) riding my bike on the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far
    > lane
    > > > and was unable to run him over with my car, so I quickly pulled off to
    a
    > > > side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up
    to
    > the
    > > > perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind
    > rage.
    > > > (Any of you who have had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run
    > deep).
    > > > Instead, I was determined to catch him on foot so I started running at
    > him
    > > > full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my footsteps and
    > looked
    > > > back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave
    of
    > > > recognition washed over his face and he took off pedaling. I never
    got
    > > > closer than about 7 feet. He rode down an alleyway and behind an
    > apartment
    > > > complex. Only then did he look back and smirk with satisfaction from
    > his
    > > > escape, now 30 feet away.
    > > >
    > > > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was
    a
    > > > fool for not thinking it through, but there will be another day. He
    > will
    > > > slip up again and then he will be mine. There will be beatings.
    Harsh
    > and
    > > > relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    > > >
    > > > Next time I will be ready.
    > > >
    > > > -John Morgan
    > >
    > >
    > > This is exactly why you should always carry a pack of D size batteries
    in
    > you car.....THWAP...right in the back of his head!
    > > --
    > > Slacker - let the ass whopping commence
    > >
    > >
    >
    > LMAO wouldnt a gun be easier?

    Sure it would. But it'd be too merciful and quick.
    --
    Westie
     
  9. Jason

    Jason Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]...
    >
    > "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down
    > > around my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Out of curiosity, how do you know it was specifically your bike?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training
    >
    >

    That would be my biggest concern. Hate to knock someones teeth in and find out it was not my bike!
    Also, it could be they bought it legally from a pawn shop, and they had no idea it was stolen!

    In that case though, if you called the cops, the bike is still legally yours right? Well who has to
    eat the money the other guy paid for *your* bike? Makes one wonder... friggin thieves... they will
    get theirs in the end, they really ruin peoples lives...

    I had to work so hard ot pay for my stolen bike, and I had no insurance...
     
  10. Mx-Pilot

    Mx-Pilot Guest

    ' the guy took off?

    then again maybe you looked like you wanted his wallet

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]...
    >
    > "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down
    > > around my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Out of curiosity, how do you know it was specifically your bike?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  11. Twisties

    Twisties New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Messages:
    145
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    0
    dammit!

    how did he know that it was you?

    man that story makes me angry!

    just make sure you dont put up posters saying "this is my bike and some guy has it so look out for him" or you can wish your chances of finding it goodbye.
     
  12. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Jason" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > That would be my biggest concern. Hate to knock someones teeth in and
    find
    > out it was not my bike! Also, it could be they bought it legally from a pawn shop, and they had no
    > idea it was stolen!

    Too bad. Stolen property is still stolen property.

    >
    > In that case though, if you called the cops, the bike is still legally
    yours
    > right? Well who has to eat the money the other guy paid for *your* bike? Makes one wonder...
    > friggin thieves... they will get theirs in the end,
    they
    > really ruin peoples lives...

    The recipient of stolen property is getting off light if all he loses is what he paid the original
    thief (or fence).

    If you had caught him....could you prove to a cop or judge it was yours?

    Pete
     
  13. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    John Morgan wrote:
    > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    > my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    > the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    > I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    > the perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who
    > have had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run deep). Instead, I was determined to catch
    > him on foot so I started running at him full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my
    > footsteps and looked back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of
    > recognition washed over his face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet.
    > He rode down an alleyway and behind an apartment complex. Only then did he look back and smirk
    > with satisfaction from his escape, now 30 feet away.
    >
    > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    > through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    > be beatings. Harsh and relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    >
    > Next time I will be ready.

    Bummer. How come there's never a half a brick or a handy chunk of pavement around when you need it?

    But, on the bright side, the thief is going to have a much harder time enjoying his ill-gotten gains
    when he's constantly looking over his shoulder.

    Kathleen

    Kathleen
     
  14. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    Slacker wrote:
    > "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    >
    >>A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    >>my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >>
    >>Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    >>the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    >>I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    >>the perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who
    >>have had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run deep). Instead, I was determined to catch
    >>him on foot so I started running at him full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my
    >>footsteps and looked back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of
    >>recognition washed over his face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet.
    >>He rode down an alleyway and behind an apartment complex. Only then did he look back and smirk
    >>with satisfaction from his escape, now 30 feet away.
    >>
    >>I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    >>through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    >>be beatings. Harsh and relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    >>
    >>Next time I will be ready.
    >>
    >>-John Morgan
    >
    >
    >
    > This is exactly why you should always carry a pack of D size batteries in you
    > car.....THWAP...right in the back of his head!

    And keep them in an old knee sock, so you can swing them like a mace, or throw them, bolo style.

    Kathleen
     
  15. Chip3130

    Chip3130 Guest

    >> Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    >> the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    >> I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to

    Next time, calmly follow him where he goes, figure out where he lives, and simply call the
    police once you know who he is and where he stays. Now, you are going to be lucky if you ever
    see him again....
     
  16. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<PHvIa.76967$%[email protected]>...
    > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down around
    > my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Today, as I was driving to work, I saw the thief (or someone he pawned it to) riding my bike on
    > the sidewalk! I was shocked! I was in the far lane and was unable to run him over with my car, so
    > I quickly pulled off to a side street. Hindsight dictates that I should have calmly walked up to
    > the perpetrator and then sprung my surprise attack, but I was in a blind rage. (Any of you who
    > have had a prized bike stolen know these feelings run deep). Instead, I was determined to catch
    > him on foot so I started running at him full speed. When I was about 15 feet away he heard my
    > footsteps and looked back over his shoulder. At first he seemed bewildered. Then a wave of
    > recognition washed over his face and he took off pedaling. I never got closer than about 7 feet.
    > He rode down an alleyway and behind an apartment complex. Only then did he look back and smirk
    > with satisfaction from his escape, now 30 feet away.
    >
    > I uttered a long string of curses and shook my fist at the sky. I was a fool for not thinking it
    > through, but there will be another day. He will slip up again and then he will be mine. There will
    > be beatings. Harsh and relentless beatings to the scum of society.
    >
    > Next time I will be ready.
    >
    > -John Morgan

    You probably would have been better off with the, "Hey buddy, you dropped something! Is this your
    minitool?" approach. I've seen two of my... oh... 6 or 7 stolen bikes. One was an old (88?)
    Stumpjumper, which was a beauty. It was under a Chinese delivery guy. He didn't stop. Similar story
    to yours. Never saw it again. The other was a pink Nishiki International roadbike from the same era.
    He passed me on my 30th birthday over the Williamsburg Bridge. I was on a bike this time, so I
    caught up with him, cut him off. I was bristling, just short of exploding, but the guy was scared
    and small and nice, and had bought it, presumably from the thief. I believed him -- bike thieves
    around here turn stolen bikes around within a couple hours here. I actually felt bad for the guy --
    he obviously loved the thing, a prized possession, and had kept it polished (if untuned) whereas I
    viewed it as a beautiful beater. I gave him $60 for it, which is what he said he'd paid for it, two
    years before. He was obviously sad to lose it. I considered finding him and giving it to him until
    he found a new bike, but hell, who died and made me Jesus? Good luck. If he rides often, chances are
    that's a regular route for him. /s
     
  17. "MX-Pilot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ' the guy took off?

    So you chase people at random to see if they'll run away, so they must have something of yours?

    The question was asking, how did the OP know that the bike was his? Specific tires, specific
    components, custom paint, etc.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  18. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    "Chuck P Adams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I would have been laughing if he got off the bike and kicked your butt and stole your car too...

    He didn't see my car, he wasn't looking for it. I may be a skinnyman, but he wasn't big either. It
    would have been an even fight, except that I was insanely angry.

    -John Morgan
     
  19. John Morgan

    John Morgan Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]...
    >
    > "John Morgan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:pHvIa.76967$%[email protected]...
    > > A year ago last May, my GT Zaskar was stolen from school and brought my world crashing down
    > > around my ears. (http://makeashorterlink.com/?M1EC22DF4)
    >
    > Out of curiosity, how do you know it was specifically your bike?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training

    LOL Phil... that's a valid question. But you just KNOW when you see a bike someone stole from you.
    Besides, it was a customized bike that I built from the frame up. I recognized it instantly. I saw
    the burnished frame, yellow tires, blue fork... and oddly enough, the lizard skin fork boots I put
    on that fork. The only thing he changed was he took off the Flite saddle and put a gigantic cushy
    gel seat on it. He'll pay for that insult.

    -John Morgan
     
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