Stomach cramps

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Jeffrey, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. Jeffrey

    Jeffrey Guest

    Being a diabetic and considering how important knowledge of food is to us all, I have a question
    that though it doesn't relate to diabetes per se, still it's possible someone here might have the
    answer. I am extremely lactose-intolerant. Whenever my better half and I order a pizza, we have to
    ask our server to make sure that cheese is left off one half of it. Last night we went out to this
    over-priced place and while the meal was good (while I was eating it) I came down with SEVERE cramps
    minutes after leaving the restaurant. My girlfriend felt fine. Now I didn't see any cheese on my
    slices so it's possible I might be sensitive to something else. The toppings we had were sun-dried
    tomatos, roasted sweet peppers and broccoli. Plus, the pizza was a bit on the oily side which needs
    mentioning because it's possible that I might also be sensitive to cooking oils. Eating mayonnaise
    in the past has caused me problems. When I search the web however for information on any links
    between cooking oils and stomach cramps, I can't find anything. Is there a link that any of you dear
    readers know of? Am I going to watch very carefully over this from now on? Are there certain oils
    out there (if there is a link) which won't cause me problems as much as others? Thanks!
     
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  2. Karen

    Karen Guest

    "Jeffrey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Being a diabetic and considering how important knowledge of food is to us all, I have a question
    > that though it doesn't relate to diabetes per se, still it's possible someone here might have the
    > answer. I am extremely lactose-intolerant. Whenever my better half and I order a pizza, we have to
    > ask our server to make sure that cheese is left off one half of it. Last night we went out to this
    > over-priced place and while the meal was good (while I was eating it) I came down with SEVERE
    > cramps minutes after leaving the restaurant. My girlfriend felt fine. Now I didn't see any cheese
    > on my slices so it's possible I might be sensitive to something else. The toppings we had were sun-
    > dried tomatos, roasted sweet peppers and broccoli. Plus, the pizza was a bit on the oily side
    > which needs mentioning because it's possible that I might also be sensitive to cooking oils.
    > Eating mayonnaise in the past has caused me problems. When I search the web however for
    > information on any links between cooking oils and stomach cramps, I can't find anything. Is there
    > a link that any of you dear readers know of? Am I going to watch very carefully over this from now
    > on? Are there certain oils out there (if there is a link) which won't cause me problems as much as
    > others? Thanks!

    Jeffrey, I too am lactose-intolerant as well as diabetic. On reading your post, my first thought was
    this: It's possible the chef put some Romano or parmesan cheese in the pizza sauce during its
    preparation, which could account for your cramps. Did you ask if the sauce is prepared with any milk
    or cheese products? Most restaurants, while they won't give out recipes, are very understanding and
    cooperative when you ask about ingredients you can't have.

    Have you tried Lactaid (lactase enzyme) caplets? These work wonders for me. If you've tried Lactaid
    and it doesn't work, there may be another medical condition at work here. Have you been tested for
    gluten intolerance (celiac disease)? Perhaps it wasn't the pizza sauce, but the crust, that caused
    your discomfort. I thought of this because you mentioned a problem with mayonnaise. Some mayonnaises
    have "modified food starch" listed as an ingredient, which is a big no-no for those with gluten
    intolerance. It would be a very good idea to check with your doctor on this.

    Good luck!

    Karen Type 2
     
  3. Julie Bove

    Julie Bove Guest

    "Jeffrey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Being a diabetic and considering how important knowledge of food is to us all, I have a question
    > that though it doesn't relate to diabetes per se, still it's possible someone here might have the
    > answer. I am extremely lactose-intolerant. Whenever my better half and I order a pizza, we have to
    > ask our server to make sure that cheese is left off one half of it. Last night we went out to this
    > over-priced place and while the meal was good (while I was eating it) I came down with SEVERE
    > cramps minutes after leaving the restaurant. My girlfriend felt fine. Now I didn't see any cheese
    > on my slices so it's possible I might be sensitive to something else. The toppings we had were sun-
    > dried tomatos, roasted sweet peppers and broccoli. Plus, the pizza was a bit on the oily side
    > which needs mentioning because it's possible that I might also be sensitive to cooking oils.
    > Eating mayonnaise in the past has caused me problems. When I search the web however for
    > information on any links between cooking oils and stomach cramps, I can't find anything. Is there
    > a link that any of you dear readers know of? Am I going to watch very carefully over this from now
    > on? Are there certain oils out there (if there is a link) which won't cause me problems as much as
    > others? Thanks!

    I have lactose intolerance too, but cheese doesn't bother me. I can have a little milk, so long as
    it's cooked in something. But to drink a glass of milk or to eat some kinds of ice cream will make
    me very sick. I also have a bad problem with garlic. I can tolerate a very tiny amount in my food,
    but if it's too much, I get terrible stomach cramps. I remember going out to a Chicago Style Pizza
    place some years ago. The pizza was loaded with garlic. My sister in law also has a dislike of
    garlic. I think her objection is mainly the taste. And while I too, dislike the taste, my main
    problem is the stomach cramps. Since the pizza was so loaded with garlic, we were fearful to try
    anything else on the menu, lest it too be loaded with the stuff. Plus, the prices were very high in
    this place and we didn't feel like shelling out any more money for food. She and I ate our salads,
    and gagged down about 1/2 a slice of pizza. By the time we got back to my parent's house, I was
    doubled over in pain.

    --
    Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
     
  4. Herman Rubin

    Herman Rubin Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Jeffrey <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Being a diabetic and considering how important knowledge of food is to us all, I have a question
    >that though it doesn't relate to diabetes per se, still it's possible someone here might have the
    >answer. I am extremely lactose-intolerant. Whenever my better half and I order a pizza, we have to
    >ask our server to make sure that cheese is left off one half of it. Last night we went out to this
    >over-priced place and while the meal was good (while I was eating it) I came down with SEVERE
    >cramps minutes after leaving the restaurant. My girlfriend felt fine. Now I didn't see any cheese
    >on my slices so it's possible I might be sensitive to something else. The toppings we had were sun-
    >dried tomatos, roasted sweet peppers and broccoli. Plus, the pizza was a bit on the oily side
    >which needs mentioning because it's possible that I might also be sensitive to cooking oils.
    >Eating mayonnaise in the past has caused me problems. When I search the web however for
    >information on any links between cooking oils and stomach cramps, I can't find anything. Is there
    >a link that any of you dear readers know of? Am I going to watch very carefully over this from now
    >on? Are there certain oils out there (if there is a link) which won't cause me problems as much as
    >others? Thanks!

    I am NOT saying that this is the reason, but broccoli is one of the cruciform vegetables, and these,
    together with beans, can cause gas to be produced. The effect is somewhat like lactose, and the
    enzyme to prevent bean gas works.

    Fats have been known to produce the problem as well, so you will need to find out what is the
    problem for you.




    --
    This address is for information only. I do not claim that these views are those of the Statistics
    Department or of Purdue University. Herman Rubin, Department of Statistics, Purdue University
    [email protected] Phone: (765)494-6054 FAX: (765)494-0558
     
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