Storing ball bearings not in use?



I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
they don't rust.
They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
you store them?

--
Regards
Peter S.
 
On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 09:42:22 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

>I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
>hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
>last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
>they don't rust.
>They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
>like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
>My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
>Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
>storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
>airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
>you store them?


I don't think tthey'll rust if you store them as is. That's how I
store mine and haven't seen any rust in years. I live vaguely near
the sea (New York City).

--
JT
****************************
Remove "remove" to reply
Visit http://www.jt10000.com
****************************
 
[email protected] wrote:
> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> they don't rust.


If they rust, throw them away, they're not the kind you want.
 
In article
<[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:

> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> they don't rust.
> They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
> like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
> My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
> Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
> storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
> airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
> you store them?


In an oil bath, or cosmoline if you can find some. As
you suspect, a coating of oil will not save you.
Actually in the oil bath, the metal parts should be
supported off of the very bottom, since water will
inevitably collect there.

--
Michael Press
 
On Jul 21, 9:42 am, [email protected] wrote:
> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> they don't rust.
> They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
> like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
> My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
> Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
> storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
> airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
> you store them?
>
> --
> Regards
> Peter S.


Store them flat so they don't dent each other over time..into some
grasso
 
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:

>I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
>hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
>last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
>they don't rust.
>They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
>like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
>My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
>Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
>storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
>airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
>you store them?
>
>


I just don't keep them in the basement, which tends to be humid and
rust-promoting.

Ned

--
Ned Mantei
Zurich, Switzerland
 
On Jul 21, 9:42 am, [email protected] wrote:
> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> they don't rust.
> They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
> like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
> My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
> Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
> storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
> airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
> you store them?


Hang them upside down from the ceiling so they don't
go out of round.

Ben
 
[email protected] wrote:
> On Jul 21, 9:42 am, [email protected] wrote:
>> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
>> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
>> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
>> they don't rust.
>> They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
>> like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
>> My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some
>> Finish Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good
>> enough for storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use
>> grease, or airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good
>> enough? How do you store them?


> Hang them upside down from the ceiling so they don't
> go out of round.


And don't forget to rotate them bi-weekly.
 
On Jul 21, 11:42 am, [email protected] wrote:
> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> they don't rust.
> They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
> like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
> My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
> Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
> storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
> airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
> you store them?
>


I've kept mine in a sac since childhood. ;-)
 
On Jul 21, 1:48 pm, Ned Mantei <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
>
> [email protected] wrote:
> >I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> >hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> >last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> >they don't rust.
> >They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
> >like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
> >My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
> >Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
> >storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
> >airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
> >you store them?

>
> I just don't keep them in the basement, which tends to be humid and
> rust-promoting.
>
> Ned
>
> --
> Ned Mantei
> Zurich, Switzerland


But this is closer to the center of the earth, more gravity..make sure
they are all flat, not stacked!!
 
On 22 Jul., 14:08, Qui si parla Campagnolo <[email protected]> wrote:

[snip]
> But this is closer to the center of the earth, more gravity..make sure
> they are all flat, not stacked!!


Thanks for all the input. I have decided to aggregate all the kind
technical suggestions, and will therefore store the ball bearings by
floating them in a permanent plasmafield.

--
Regards
Peter S.
 
[email protected] wrote:
> On 22 Jul., 14:08, Qui si parla Campagnolo <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> [snip]
>> But this is closer to the center of the earth, more gravity..make sure
>> they are all flat, not stacked!!

>
> Thanks for all the input. I have decided to aggregate all the kind
> technical suggestions, and will therefore store the ball bearings by
> floating them in a permanent plasmafield.
>
> --
> Regards
> Peter S.
>


Just make sure it's not a magnetic field or Jobst will be down on you....
 
The bags are ok-tape shut.
http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?memberId=12500226&productId=39174032
Wal and H-D carry boxes that seal well with a sheet of plastic
material laid across the open box then top closed on it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silica_gel
the idea is preventing moisture entry or condensation thru temperature
differentials.
The packaged oil is maybe all right but your oil may carry water! So
the elevation from the bottom- a sump- is a good idea.
The primo method for humid and uncontrolled climates could be linseed
oil in pill bottles with a sumped bottom: bottles then placed ikn an
Otter with desiccant.
Desiccant requires a closed and closed in a dry warm atmosphere
environment otherwise the desiccant will attract excess moisture.
if you develop a method for avoiding the magnetic field without extra
energy input please email.
 
On Jul 21, 11:42 am, [email protected] wrote:
> I just bought an assortment of different sized ball bearings for my
> hubs and pedals. With 100 pieces for each size I suspect they will
> last me several years, so now I wonder how to store them correctly so
> they don't rust.
> They came in small plastic bags folded and stapled together. It looks
> like there is a very thin oil film on the bearings.
> My first thought was to put them in zip-lock bags and pour some Finish
> Line Cross Country wet lube into each bag, but is this good enough for
> storing them for perhaps 3-5 years, or should I use grease, or
> airtight containers, or is the supplied oil film good enough? How do
> you store them?
>

Narrow olive jar with the plastic holder thing that pulls out. Cover
with your choice of oil. Make sure to label it so drunken Italians
don't try to make a puttanesca with them.
 
On 2007-07-22, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

> On 22 Jul., 14:08, Qui si parla Campagnolo <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> [snip]
>> But this is closer to the center of the earth, more gravity..make sure
>> they are all flat, not stacked!!

>
> Thanks for all the input. I have decided to aggregate all the kind
> technical suggestions, and will therefore store the ball bearings by
> floating them in a permanent plasmafield.


Dude! Don't do that! Two words: "plasma embrittlement!"

Let's face it, ball bearings have a strictly limited shelf life. Isn't
there a local farmer's market in your area where some codger sells fresh
ones out of the back of his truck? Just pop by there a couple times a
week and you'll be fine.

--

John ([email protected])
 
On Jul 22, 6:47 am, [email protected] wrote:
> On 22 Jul., 14:08, Qui si parla Campagnolo <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> [snip]
>
> > But this is closer to the center of the earth, more gravity..make sure
> > they are all flat, not stacked!!

>
> Thanks for all the input. I have decided to aggregate all the kind
> technical suggestions, and will therefore store the ball bearings by
> floating them in a permanent plasmafield.
>
> --
> Regards
> Peter S.


......Some oil into the bag..seal, they will be fine.
 
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:

> On Jul 21, 1:48 pm, Ned Mantei <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> I just don't keep them in the basement, which tends to be
>> humid and rust-promoting.

>
> But this is closer to the center of the earth, more
> gravity..make sure they are all flat, not stacked!!


No. Once you get below the earth's surface, gravity decreases
again. It's zero at the centre.

John