Storing food in opened cans

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Mar 13, 2005.

  1. How safe would it be to leave food in opened cans?

    I can remember in past days that doing so would cause lead poisoning.
    I am not sure what they line the cans with now, but I am sure it does
    not contain lead.

    How safe would it be to open a can of beans and eat half and put the
    other half covered in the fridge? Leave it for a day? Leave it for a
    week?

    I don't like to wash dishes. :)
     
    Tags:


  2. I don't like a "tinny" taste. So I transfer food to a container and
    label it with the date. If you stick a can in there, you run the risk
    of forgetting when you opened it. You can't seal or close it properly
    either. So the food inside may get dried up...or the liquid may absorb
    any "RO" (refrigerator odor) you may have. As someone who cleans her
    Mom's fridge constantly of these pests, I say it's not safe on many
    levels. If you pour the leftover food into a dish you can use to heat
    and eat from, you're not washing any extra dishes. You can chuck a
    Ziplock Container.
     
  3. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > How safe would it be to leave food in opened cans?
    >
    > I can remember in past days that doing so would cause lead poisoning.
    > I am not sure what they line the cans with now, but I am sure it does
    > not contain lead.
    >
    > How safe would it be to open a can of beans and eat half and put the
    > other half covered in the fridge? Leave it for a day? Leave it for a
    > week?
    >
    > I don't like to wash dishes. :)
    >



    No problem. Actually, there has never been a problem with it. A week
    might be pushing it if your fridge isn't cold enough, but that has
    nothing to do with the can.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  4. [email protected] wrote:
    > How safe would it be to leave food in opened cans?
    >
    > I can remember in past days that doing so would cause lead poisoning.
    > I am not sure what they line the cans with now, but I am sure it does
    > not contain lead.
    >
    > How safe would it be to open a can of beans and eat half and put the
    > other half covered in the fridge? Leave it for a day? Leave it for

    a
    > week?


    Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck half-full
    cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    baggie. No problem.

    Mac
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > How safe would it be to leave food in opened cans?
    > >
    > > I can remember in past days that doing so would cause lead

    poisoning.
    > > I am not sure what they line the cans with now, but I am sure it

    does
    > > not contain lead.
    > >
    > > How safe would it be to open a can of beans and eat half and put

    the
    > > other half covered in the fridge? Leave it for a day? Leave it

    for
    > a
    > > week?

    >
    > Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    > fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck

    half-full
    > cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    > baggie. No problem.
    >
    > Mac


    Highly unsafe practice... leftover tinned food must be removed to a
    non-metalic container.

    http://www.nfpa-food.org/content/consumers/faqs.asp
     
  6. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    >>fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck
    >>half-full
    >>cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    >>baggie. No problem.
    >>
    >>Mac

    >
    >
    > Highly unsafe practice... leftover tinned food must be removed to a
    > non-metalic container.
    >
    > http://www.nfpa-food.org/content/consumers/faqs.asp
    >



    No it's not unsafe. The cans are coated on the inside with lacquer.
    Some cans (like the ones used for corn) are coated with enamel. If the
    lacquer gets scratched, the food may discolor at the site of the scratch
    and absorb a little iron -- which is good for you.

    If it were unsafe, it would have been unsafe to put the food in the can
    in the first place. Don't believe everything you read on the Internet.

    Bob
     
  7. George

    George Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:


    Don't believe everything you read on the Internet.


    Especially when it is published by the National Food Processors
    Association. I can't imagine how they think they have the credentials to
    publish such ridiculous guidelines...


    >
    > Bob
     
  8. Pretty useful info. Thanks

    I wish every can had a LARGE expration date.
     
  9. "George" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >
    > Don't believe everything you read on the Internet.
    >
    >
    > Especially when it is published by the National Food Processors
    > Association. I can't imagine how they think they have the credentials to
    > publish such ridiculous guidelines...
    >


    They have a bunch of candy-assed lawyers that would have you do anything to
    eliminate the can once opened. You keep something in the opened can for six
    weeks and it gets all moldy and you eat it anyway. they get sued.
    Eliminate the can, eliminate the potential lawsuit.

    How many products also say "refrigerate after opening" but don't really have
    to be refrigerated? Ketchup is a perfect example.

    Don't believe everything you read if a lawyer was involved.
    --
    Ed
    http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/
     
  10. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "George" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Don't believe everything you read on the Internet.
    >>
    >>
    >> Especially when it is published by the National Food Processors
    >> Association. I can't imagine how they think they have the credentials to
    >> publish such ridiculous guidelines...
    >>

    >
    > They have a bunch of candy-assed lawyers that would have you do anything
    > to eliminate the can once opened. You keep something in the opened can
    > for six weeks and it gets all moldy and you eat it anyway. they get sued.
    > Eliminate the can, eliminate the potential lawsuit.
    >
    > How many products also say "refrigerate after opening" but don't really
    > have to be refrigerated? Ketchup is a perfect example.


    Get ready Ed! I made a similar comment a short while back about this and it
    sent half the regulars on here chasing after their ketchup bottles and they
    were quick to point out my little error.

    >
    > Don't believe everything you read if a lawyer was involved.


    No argument there!

    > --
    > Ed
    > http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


    Bret



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  11. king kong

    king kong Guest

    I've kept opened 5 pound cans of refried beans for two weeks in the
    fridge with a baggie over the top, no problems.


    [email protected] wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>How safe would it be to leave food in opened cans?
    >>
    >>I can remember in past days that doing so would cause lead poisoning.
    >>I am not sure what they line the cans with now, but I am sure it does
    >>not contain lead.
    >>
    >>How safe would it be to open a can of beans and eat half and put the
    >>other half covered in the fridge? Leave it for a day? Leave it for

    >
    > a
    >
    >>week?

    >
    >
    > Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    > fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck half-full
    > cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    > baggie. No problem.
    >
    > Mac
    >
     
  12. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    king kong farts wrote:
    > I've kept opened 5 pound cans of refried beans for two weeks in the
    > fridge with a baggie over the top, no problems.


    Anyone who eats 5 pounds of refried beans has much larger problems.
     
  13. Sheldon wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>>How safe would it be to leave food in opened cans?
    >>>
    >>>I can remember in past days that doing so would cause lead poisoning.
    >>>I am not sure what they line the cans with now, but I am sure it does
    >>>not contain lead.
    >>>
    >>>How safe would it be to open a can of beans and eat half and put the
    >>>other half covered in the fridge? Leave it for a day? Leave it for

    >>a week?
    >>
    >>Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    >>fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck half-full
    >>cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    >>baggie. No problem.
    >>
    >>Mac

    >
    > Highly unsafe practice... leftover tinned food must be removed to a
    > non-metalic container.
    >
    > http://www.nfpa-food.org/content/consumers/faqs.asp


    Or else you get "Open can poisoning" because the can suddenly
    transforms into Kryptonite and makes you weak and you fall down,
    sobbing, next to Clark Kent (who you didn't know was Superman because
    he combed his hair differently and put on those eyeglasses).

    Oh, wait. I forgot. That doesn't happen anymore. Now what happens is
    that the can gradually shrinks because of the humidity levels in the
    fridge and squeezes the food in it into little bullets of Former-Food
    that are only useful as anti-tank slugs, but with protein, fats and
    carbs...

    Cans are designed to hold food. Modern packaging practices have
    removed the things in the containers that could potentially be
    harmful. Corporate lawyers have changed the laws of physics and
    biochemistry just by saying it's not safe, just like blowhole Sheldon
    whose last original thought was to fingerpaint with that stuff he
    found in his diaper. Amazing power over the physical universe, they
    all have...

    Pastorio
     
  14. George

    George Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    >
    > They have a bunch of candy-assed lawyers that would have you do anything to
    > eliminate the can once opened. You keep something in the opened can for six
    > weeks and it gets all moldy and you eat it anyway. they get sued.
    > Eliminate the can, eliminate the potential lawsuit.
    >
    > How many products also say "refrigerate after opening" but don't really have
    > to be refrigerated? Ketchup is a perfect example.
    >
    > Don't believe everything you read if a lawyer was involved.



    I don't disagree with you about lawyers. But can or not the lawyers will
    jump in. "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, my client became seriously
    ill after eating food canned by the defendant. The defendants council
    will try to tell you they are not responsible because my client
    transferred the contents of the can to his own container. But you must
    find that the defendant is liable because they did not provide a
    specific warning about mould growth..."
     
  15. George

    George Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >
    > Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    > fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck half-full
    > cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    > baggie. No problem.
    >
    > Mac
    >


    This is equivalent to saying "I drove 60 MPH on an icy road today and
    did not have an accident". Just because you didn't have an accident
    doesn't mean it is safe to do that and it doesn't mean you will get the
    same result the next time.
     
  16. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    George wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Perfectly safe. If the can itself is covered the food will remain
    >> fresh as long as it would in a storage container. I've stuck half-full
    >> cans in the fridge (much to my spouse's horror)covered with a plastic
    >> baggie. No problem.
    >>
    >> Mac
    >>

    >
    > This is equivalent to saying "I drove 60 MPH on an icy road today and
    > did not have an accident". Just because you didn't have an accident
    > doesn't mean it is safe to do that and it doesn't mean you will get the
    > same result the next time.



    Then maybe you'd care to explain what the obvious risk of using an
    opened can for storing food in the refrigerator is? (Hint: I've
    already explained in an earlier post why it's not risky. You might want
    to refer to that.)

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  17. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > just like blowhole Sheldon whose last original thought was to
    > fingerpaint with that stuff he found in his diaper. Amazing power
    > over the physical universe, they all have...
    >



    Actually, Sheldon's last original thought was to use the word
    "pecksniff" (borrowed from Dickens) to describe a certain type of
    obnoxoius asshole that wanders in here occasionally. The word wasn't
    original, but I believe the application was.

    It's a good word; a classic literary reference that sounds vaguely
    obscene. I think it's Sheldon's most valuable contribution to the
    group. He should have quit while he was ahead.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  18. aem

    aem Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    >[snip]
    > Why yoose imbeciles can't figure out why NOT to store leftovers in
    > cans is utterly amazing.
    >
    > Slews of reputable citations can be found, and from all corners of
    > the world, not just the US... here's another"
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/6cfn3


    Maybe because the reputable citations simply say 'don't do it' without
    saying anything about _why_ moving the food to another container is
    better. It's not the temperature, it's not covering any container
    airtight, what is it? This cite is another government agency which
    will naturally err on the side of caution. If they actually know
    something that's wrong with using original cans, they don't say so.

    Is it just canned goods? I opened a jar of pickle relish the other day
    to mix some with mayo, etc. for a kind of tartar sauce. Put the jar
    back in the 'fridge. Should I have transferred the relish to a storage
    container? What makes glass better than cans? What about the leftover
    sour cream? What makes coated paper better than cans?

    -aem
     
  19. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "aem" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >>[snip]
    >> Why yoose imbeciles can't figure out why NOT to store leftovers in
    >> cans is utterly amazing.
    >>
    >> Slews of reputable citations can be found, and from all corners of
    >> the world, not just the US... here's another"
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/6cfn3

    >
    > Maybe because the reputable citations simply say 'don't do it' without
    > saying anything about _why_ moving the food to another container is
    > better. It's not the temperature, it's not covering any container
    > airtight, what is it? This cite is another government agency which
    > will naturally err on the side of caution. If they actually know
    > something that's wrong with using original cans, they don't say so.
    >
    > Is it just canned goods? I opened a jar of pickle relish the other day
    > to mix some with mayo, etc. for a kind of tartar sauce. Put the jar
    > back in the 'fridge. Should I have transferred the relish to a storage
    > container? What makes glass better than cans? What about the leftover
    > sour cream? What makes coated paper better than cans?
    >
    > -aem


    I believe the cautions date from many years ago when metal cans were made
    differently. Food in the presence of air could react with the metal of the
    can and create off colors, tastes, and perhaps even toxins. As has been
    pointed out by others, cans are vastly improved these days and the dangers
    no longer exist.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
    >
     
  20. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    aem wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    > >[snip]
    > > Why yoose imbeciles can't figure out why NOT to store leftovers in
    > > cans is utterly amazing.
    > >
    > > Slews of reputable citations can be found, and from all corners of
    > > the world, not just the US... here's another"
    > >
    > > http://tinyurl.com/6cfn3

    >
    > Maybe because the reputable citations simply say 'don't do it'

    without
    > saying anything about _why_ moving the food to another container is
    > better. It's not the temperature, it's not covering any container
    > airtight, what is it? This cite is another government agency which
    > will naturally err on the side of caution. If they actually know
    > something that's wrong with using original cans, they don't say so.
    >
    > Is it just canned goods? I opened a jar of pickle relish the other

    day
    > to mix some with mayo, etc. for a kind of tartar sauce. Put the jar
    > back in the 'fridge. Should I have transferred the relish to a

    storage
    > container? What makes glass better than cans? What about the

    leftover
    > sour cream? What makes coated paper better than cans?


    Sheesh... so close yet so far... you are truly dumb beyond belief, and
    you're fighting tooth and claw to remain so. You actually answered the
    question... but with the IQ of sea cucumber there's no way you can
    know.
     
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