Storing nectarines

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jen, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Jen

    Jen Guest

    I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps again.
    Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not too
    bad. Any other ideas?

    Jen
     
    Tags:


  2. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:32:30 GMT, Jen wrote:

    > I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    > starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps again.
    > Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not too
    > bad. Any other ideas?
    >

    You could make a pie... or jam/preserves.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  3. On Tue 24 Jan 2006 09:58:55p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it sf?

    > On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:32:30 GMT, Jen wrote:
    >
    >> I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm
    >> just starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be
    >> heaps again. Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried
    >> freezing them - not too bad. Any other ideas?
    >>

    > You could make a pie... or jam/preserves.


    Ooh! A fresh nectarine pie...that would be scrumptious!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  4. Jen

    Jen Guest

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:32:30 GMT, Jen wrote:
    >
    >> I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    >> starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps
    >> again.
    >> Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not
    >> too
    >> bad. Any other ideas?
    >>

    > You could make a pie... or jam/preserves.
    > --
    >


    Would you have a recipe for the pie? I don't know how to do preserves, do
    you have instructions? Thanks

    Jen
     
  5. On Tue 24 Jan 2006 10:19:53p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Jen?

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:32:30 GMT, Jen wrote:
    >>
    >>> I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm
    >>> just starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be
    >>> heaps again. Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried
    >>> freezing them - not too bad. Any other ideas?
    >>>

    >> You could make a pie... or jam/preserves.
    >> --
    >>

    >
    > Would you have a recipe for the pie? I don't know how to do preserves,
    > do you have instructions? Thanks
    >
    > Jen


    Assuming you have your own recipe for pie pastry, or use refrigerated pie
    pastry...enough for a 2-crust deep 9-inch pie.

    6 cup sliced nectarines
    3/4 cup sugar
    1/3 cup flour
    1 tbsp lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon almond extract
    1/2 tsp cinnamon
    Additional sugar and cinnamon for top

    Mix the sliced fruit with remaining ingredients and fill the pie crust.
    Make a lattice crust for the top, or use a solid crust. Sprinkle
    additional sugar and cinnamon on top. Bake at 425 degrees for 15 minutes.
    Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue baking 30-40 minutes, or until
    filling is bubbling and crust is golden brown. Cool to room temperature
    before serving.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  6. sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:32:30 GMT, Jen wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    >> starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps again.
    >> Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not too
    >> bad. Any other ideas?
    >>

    >
    > You could make a pie... or jam/preserves.


    Butter, rumtopf, clafouti, coulis, leather...

    Finish them and I'll come up with more...

    Pastorio
     
  7. Jude

    Jude Guest

    You could put a bunch of them in a box and send them to me!! =) Then
    they won't go bad!
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Jen" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    > starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps again.
    > Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not too
    > bad. Any other ideas?
    >
    > Jen


    Use/handle/store as you would fresh peaches.

    I don't know what your safe practices are for preserving (we usually say
    'canning') them are. This is a reliable US site for home preserving
    information: www.uga.edu/nchfp. The simplest preserving, if you have
    the space, would be to freeze them. Wash, pit, and slice into plastic
    freezer bags. Pour a little orange juice over and seal with as little
    air inside as practical. Label and freeze flat, then stack the bags in
    a box.

    Just so you know -- I'm jealous as anything!
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
     
  9. Jen

    Jen Guest

    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Jen" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Just so you know -- I'm jealous as anything!



    You're right to be jealous - they are really good, they don't compare at
    all to bought ones. These have so much flavour. People have already been
    asking for some when they ripen, but it seems no matter how many I give
    away, there's still too much for everyone. Considering it was just 5 years
    ago when we moved into this house and the tree was half dead, it's pretty
    impressive.

    Jen
     
  10. sueb

    sueb Guest

    Jen wrote:
    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Jen" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > Just so you know -- I'm jealous as anything!

    >
    >
    > You're right to be jealous - they are really good, they don't compare at
    > all to bought ones. These have so much flavour. People have already been
    > asking for some when they ripen, but it seems no matter how many I give
    > away, there's still too much for everyone. Considering it was just 5 years
    > ago when we moved into this house and the tree was half dead, it's pretty
    > impressive.
    >


    I'm jealous too - it's my favorite fruit and it'll be 6 months before
    they're good here.

    You can also dry them. Use the same process that people use with
    apricots. This is great because you can use the windfalls and the
    really gooshy ones that you might hesitate to put into a pie.

    Susan B.
     
  11. Jen

    Jen Guest

    "sueb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Jen wrote:
    >> "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > "Jen" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > Just so you know -- I'm jealous as anything!

    >>
    >>
    >> You're right to be jealous - they are really good, they don't compare at
    >> all to bought ones. These have so much flavour. People have already
    >> been
    >> asking for some when they ripen, but it seems no matter how many I give
    >> away, there's still too much for everyone. Considering it was just 5
    >> years
    >> ago when we moved into this house and the tree was half dead, it's pretty
    >> impressive.
    >>

    >
    > I'm jealous too - it's my favorite fruit and it'll be 6 months before
    > they're good here.
    >
    > You can also dry them. Use the same process that people use with
    > apricots. This is great because you can use the windfalls and the
    > really gooshy ones that you might hesitate to put into a pie.
    >
    > Susan B.


    I was just wondering about that. What's the process for peaches? I don't
    know anything about it. Thanks

    Jen
     
  12. sueb

    sueb Guest

    Jen wrote:
    > "sueb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Jen wrote:
    > >> "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> > "Jen" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> > Just so you know -- I'm jealous as anything!
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> You're right to be jealous - they are really good, they don't compare at
    > >> all to bought ones. These have so much flavour. People have already
    > >> been
    > >> asking for some when they ripen, but it seems no matter how many I give
    > >> away, there's still too much for everyone. Considering it was just 5
    > >> years
    > >> ago when we moved into this house and the tree was half dead, it's pretty
    > >> impressive.
    > >>

    > >
    > > I'm jealous too - it's my favorite fruit and it'll be 6 months before
    > > they're good here.
    > >
    > > You can also dry them. Use the same process that people use with
    > > apricots. This is great because you can use the windfalls and the
    > > really gooshy ones that you might hesitate to put into a pie.
    > >
    > > Susan B.

    >
    > I was just wondering about that. What's the process for peaches? I don't
    > know anything about it. Thanks
    >


    First - see if there are any commercial drying yards that will allow
    you to bring in your own fruit. There haven't been any in my neck of
    the woods for 20 years but you're in a whole different hemisphere!

    If not,
    Collect up a lot of wooden fruit boxes. Cut the peaches in half, take
    out the pits. Arrange them in single layers on the bottoms of the
    fruit boxes with the cut side up. (Depending on the size of the
    peaches, you might want to cut each piece in half again.) PIck up some
    "burning sulfur." Put about a fist full into a flame-proof container -
    we used to use a cat food can. Put the container full of sulfer on the
    ground. Stack the fruit boxes vertically on top, of the sulfur leaving
    room between for smoke to pass through. Wrap the whole stack in heavy
    plastic. Light the sulfur: it should burn for a few hours, keep the
    plastic on the stack for a few hours more. Stay away from the fumes!

    When they're done sulfuring, you break up the stack and lay the boxes
    where they will get lots of sun. Turn the pieces over periodically.
    Apricots dry in about three days, peaches will probably take longer.

    The juicier the fruit is, the better the dried fruit will be.

    Susan B.
     
  13. Jen

    Jen Guest

    "sueb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > First - see if there are any commercial drying yards that will allow
    > you to bring in your own fruit. There haven't been any in my neck of
    > the woods for 20 years but you're in a whole different hemisphere!
    >
    > If not,
    > Collect up a lot of wooden fruit boxes. Cut the peaches in half, take
    > out the pits. Arrange them in single layers on the bottoms of the
    > fruit boxes with the cut side up. (Depending on the size of the
    > peaches, you might want to cut each piece in half again.) PIck up some
    > "burning sulfur." Put about a fist full into a flame-proof container -
    > we used to use a cat food can. Put the container full of sulfer on the
    > ground. Stack the fruit boxes vertically on top, of the sulfur leaving
    > room between for smoke to pass through. Wrap the whole stack in heavy
    > plastic. Light the sulfur: it should burn for a few hours, keep the
    > plastic on the stack for a few hours more. Stay away from the fumes!
    >
    > When they're done sulfuring, you break up the stack and lay the boxes
    > where they will get lots of sun. Turn the pieces over periodically.
    > Apricots dry in about three days, peaches will probably take longer.



    I have never heard of any drying yards before, so I doubt there are ay
    nearby.

    We have major fires around here at the moment, and a bit of a heat wave. So
    I don't think burning sulphur would be an option (I don't know where to get
    burning sulphur from either).

    Thanks anyway. Maybe I'll look into a food dehydrator. Or does anyone know
    of a way to use the oven to dry them, or the sun?

    Jen
     
  14. Jen

    Jen Guest

    > I don't know what your safe practices are for preserving (we usually say
    > 'canning') them are. This is a reliable US site for home preserving
    > information: www.uga.edu/nchfp. The simplest preserving, if you have
    > the space, would be to freeze them. Wash, pit, and slice into plastic
    > freezer bags. Pour a little orange juice over and seal with as little
    > air inside as practical. Label and freeze flat, then stack the bags in
    > a box.



    Looks like with canning fruit, I need a special *canner*. Maybe it's
    something to look into for future years.

    I've tried freezing, - not bad. I'll love to be able to do a few different
    things though. Thanks

    Ken
     
  15. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Jen wrote:
    > I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    > starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps again.
    > Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not too
    > bad. Any other ideas?


    Macerate... I love that word, how it rolls off the tongue with a big
    steamy Ssssssss...

    1. Learn...

    http://www.latimes.com/features/pri...?coll=la-headlines-pe-food&ctrack=1&cset=true

    ----

    2. Oh my...

    http://www.waitrose.com/food_drink/recipes/recipesearch/recipe/0408042-r04.asp

    ---

    Sheldon
     
  16. Jen

    Jen Guest

    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Jen wrote:
    >> I wonder if anyone has any good ways to use/store nectarines? I'm just
    >> starting to get some ripe on the tree, and there is going to be heaps
    >> again.
    >> Last year I ended up throwing heaps out. I've tried freezing them - not
    >> too
    >> bad. Any other ideas?

    >
    > Macerate... I love that word, how it rolls off the tongue with a big
    > steamy Ssssssss...
    >
    > 1. Learn...
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/features/pri...?coll=la-headlines-pe-food&ctrack=1&cset=true
    >
    > ----



    I had to be registered to see it - which I don't want to have to do. Can
    you tell me what it says.

    > 2. Oh my...
    >
    > http://www.waitrose.com/food_drink/recipes/recipesearch/recipe/0408042-r04.asp
    >



    We don't drink alcohol, but good idea if we did.

    Thanks

    Jen
     
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