storing steel bike in humidity

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by SamMan23, Dec 5, 2003.

  1. SamMan23

    SamMan23 New Member

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    I have a steel lemond frame. I was moving to another place where I might have to store my bike in an outdoor room. It would be protected from direct rain, but I was wondering how the frame and components would do in the humidity.
     
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  2. Paul41

    Paul41 New Member

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    I keep my bike (it is also steel) in my garage and live where it is humid and have never had any problems.
     
  3. shokhead1

    shokhead1 New Member

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    Good coat of wax and frame saver.
     
  4. Cipher

    Cipher New Member

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  5. waterford

    waterford New Member

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    I also use Bike Wash (a Finish Line product) regularly. It is said to help prevent surface rust. Also, dirt seems to attract moisture. If you have ever seen the very thin walls on 853 tubing like LeMond uses, you will appreciate how important rust prevent is.
     
  6. waterford

    waterford New Member

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    I neglected to add that you should lube your derailers and brake points regularly (I use Boeshield T-14) and spray your chain, cogs and chainrings with t-14 or another good corrosion preventer. I didn't and my chain never worked as well after a winter's storage and my front derailer was frozen. Basically, I store my best bikes in the winter and ride an older bike when the weather is poor.
     
  7. BaCardi

    BaCardi New Member

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    Some framebuilders use linseed oil. Its cheap and available at Home Depot in the paint section. A gallon costs next to nothing. Boil some in a pot and pour it into each tube. Make sure all the inner tubes are coated especially the rust prone chainstays. Turn the bike upside down, sideways, righside up, and every which way to get the linseed oil to drain out. Let it sit outside for a few hours to dry. Remember to wipe off the excess. Presto! Rust protection that will last for years!
     
  8. armchair_spacem

    armchair_spacem New Member

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    I live in a coastal area where steel frames are vulnerable to salt and moisture - many of us here use fish oil in our steel frames - forms a persistent, penetrating rust preventive coating and it's dirt cheap - about $3 aussie for a big spray can. Spray into your tubes and roll the bike around every which way to distribute it evenly, then allow the frame to drain. Best applied in winter because your frame will reek for a week or two, worse in summer heat (though it does smell kind of like the ocean).:D
     
  9. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Save time and energy.Buy BOILED linseed oil.
     
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