Stoves

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Brian, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull gas
    stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on stoves
    which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find these not
    very stable.

    I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?

    I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone have
    any experience of this stove?

    --
    Brian
     
    Tags:


  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brian <[email protected]> writes
    >I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    >gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    >stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    >these not very stable.
    >
    >I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    >fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?

    Unless you have a real need for liquid fuel I would stick
    with gas due to its simplicity. You can get stable gas
    stoves that have a pipe leading to the canister such as:

    http://www.cotswold-outdoor.com/Cat/68527 http://www.cotswold-
    outdoor.com/Cat/2006
    >
    >I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone have
    >any experience of this stove?
    >

    It is quite a neat little unit but needs a windbreak if
    there is much wind about. I carry some heavy duty kitchen
    foil inside mine to make a windbreak if necessary. It can be
    a bit thirsty too requiring quite a bit of fuel if you are
    out for a few days.

    --

    http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/
     
  3. Tony Buckley

    Tony Buckley Guest

    Brian wrote

    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What
    sort
    > of stove should I go for?

    Have to second what Dominic wrote on this. Unless you really
    do need something that'll burn most things except coal,
    you're better off with gas. Gas is clean, doesn't smell,
    shouldn't leak, is no heavier and no more expensive than
    most other things. And the stoves are light, quiet and don't
    have to sit on top of the canister, and don't flare up when
    you first light them in a potentially tent-melting way.

    That said, I have a Primus multifuel (forget which variant)
    that will burn almost everything, including gas. Its
    performance using gas cylinders is compromised; it takes
    longer than a dedicated gas stove, and whatever you burn it
    sounds like a jet aircraft. It's been very handy when
    travelling to the US, where gas (ie, gas...not 'gas', ie
    petrol) can be hard to come by though, and if you were going
    on an extended trek then it would be right up your street.

    However, it isn't light, although I did drill off the legs,
    allowing it to slot into the base of the larger Trangia,
    where wind just encourages it. Fun if you're in a crazy
    world of Arthur Brown mood.

    T.
     
  4. Jim Ford

    Jim Ford Guest

    * Brian <[email protected]> deigned to grace
    uk.rec.walking
    * with their presence by declaiming:
    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    > these not very stable.

    IMO avoid meths - It's got a low calorific value, it stinks
    your kit out and contaminates food if the storage container
    leaks, it soots cooking utensils, you can't properly control
    the flame, also the flame is invisible in the sunlight -
    with attendant danger. I'm at a loss as to why the Trangia
    is so popular! Maybe it's because it's favoured by youth
    groups for its robustness, and folk that have been
    introduced to them this way tend to stick with them in the
    absence of knowing better.

    I'd go for gas. I use a Coleman Artic(?) - it folds small
    and has a pre-heating loop to keep the butane/propane
    gasseous in cold weather.

    Regards: Jim Ford
     
  5. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the
    gas
    > cannister as I find these not very stable.

    Some of us find them quite stable enough - what's the
    problem?

    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What
    sort
    > of stove should I go for?

    Carrying petrol is almost as bad as carrying radioactive
    materials. Toxic spills are bad in all cases.

    > I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    > have any
    experience
    > of this stove?

    You could get a gas burner for it as well.
    --
    Mark South Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net <<Tiens!
    Ce poulet a une grenade!
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Brian wrote:
    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    > these not very stable.
    >
    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?

    Liquid multi-fuel pressure stoves are great if:

    - you're going somewhere with marginal fuel supplies (most
    of us aren't)
    - you need a lot of raw power to melt snow for a water
    supply (most of us don't)

    They're pretty ghastly in many other respects. They need
    more maintenance than almost any other stove, they're
    fiddlier to light, often less easy to control the output
    (certainly in relation to gas) and the lighting requires
    priming which is more of a fire hazard than any other aspect
    of camp stove cooking. And they're expensive. I think an
    awful lot have been sold on the back of them being thought
    "proper mountaineering equipment", as opposed to actually
    being best for the user's particular needs.

    A modern light gas stove with a wide tripod that takes its
    gas through a feed hose rather than a direct mount is
    probably the best general purpose UK camping stove you'll
    get. The Trangia with gas conversion is more stable and
    windproof, but is heavier and more expensive. Note that the
    Primus Omnifuel and Multifuel stoves will let you use gas
    cartridges too, but they don't have a dedicated gas spreader
    rose and don't work quite as well as a dedicated gas stove.

    > I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    > have any experience of this stove?

    The T-minis are okay if you want a fresh brew on a hillside,
    but they're a bit limited for much in the way of real
    cooking IMHO.

    I'd get a better gas stove, unless you're planning on
    expeditions where gas cartridges aren't for sale or lots of
    time over the snowline with no other water.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
    33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
    Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. In message <slrnc8f4rl.[email protected]>, Jim Ford
    <[email protected] .freeserve.co.uk> writes
    >* Brian <[email protected]> deigned to grace
    > uk.rec.walking
    >* with their presence by declaiming:
    >> I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    >> gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    >> stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    >> these not very stable.
    >
    >IMO avoid meths - It's got a low calorific value, it stinks
    >your kit out and contaminates food if the storage container
    >leaks, it soots cooking utensils,

    Ah now I think that's a plus. It cleans off dead easily and
    it's such a good feeling - you know, like shaving off 4 (or
    8) days of stubble...

    >you can't properly control the flame, also the flame is
    >invisible in the sunlight - with attendant danger. I'm at a
    >loss as to why the Trangia is so popular! Maybe it's
    >because it's favoured by youth groups for its robustness,
    >and folk that have been introduced to them this way tend to
    >stick with them in the absence of knowing better.
    >
    >I'd go for gas. I use a Coleman Artic(?) - it folds small
    >and has a pre-heating loop to keep the butane/propane
    >gasseous in cold weather.

    Ah now there we have it. I started life on gas (actually, I
    started on primus stoves, for one expedition only) and moved
    to trangia for 2 reasons:

    - getting gas to work in the cold
    - never knowing when the gas would run out

    I fondly thought that the Trangia weight didn't matter, as
    it had the billies (as they were then known) thrown in as
    part of the works. It was quite a surprise when we did some
    equipment weighing in this group a few years back to
    discover what a big difference there is in weight. My last
    outing we used gas and I was pleasantly surprised by its
    ease of use and speed of heating. Reluctantly, I'm probably
    going to return to gas: it's a traumatic feeling (so
    disloyal) - a bit like sacking your operating system. (I'm
    thinking of doing that too...)

    --
    Michael Farthing cyclades Software House
     
  8. Joe Bloggs

    Joe Bloggs Guest

    "Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the
    gas
    > cannister as I find these not very stable.
    >
    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What
    sort
    > of stove should I go for?
    >
    > I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    > have any
    experience
    > of this stove?
    >

    Have a look at http://www.optimus.se/products/hiker/

    This is similar to the first stove I ever bought (I've got
    the older 111 model). It will burn kerosene, white spirits
    and meths.

    They are excellent stoves, very well made and very hot, but
    they are on the heavy side. It came in useful when I moved
    into my new house 6 weeks before the gas cooker arrived!!

    Dave.
     
  9. Si

    Si Guest

    On 22 Apr 2004 06:45:47 GMT, Brian wrote:

    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    > these not very stable.
    >
    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?
    >
    > I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    > have any experience of this stove?

    I've had an MSR Dragonfly for about 5 years now, and found
    it to be fantastic, its done endless weekend trips, weeks in
    Spain, France & Corsica, -where you can get petrol far
    easier than gas/meths- its also recently done 5 weeks of
    constant use in Iceland using pretty dirty fuel with the
    minimal of maintance.

    One point worth noting though is that only a few weeks back
    a small weld broke on the burner assembly, luckly this
    happened while I was at home as it made the stove almost
    usuable, but to First Ascent's (UK importers of MSR) credit,
    with just one email and no questions asked it was replaced
    within a week, not bad for a 5 year old stove thats had a
    fair thrashing.

    I have used Trangia's (both Meths and Gas), Gas stoves and a
    variety of petrol/multi-fuel stoves and I can say for
    certain that I would go for the dragonfly everytime. Its not
    a cheap stove but its served me well.

    Cheers Si,

    --
    Si, 22/04/2004 18:35:25 www.srhymes.co.uk
    www.dartmoorrouteplanner.org.uk
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Joe Bloggs <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    >> gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    >> stoves which fit on top of the
    >gas
    >> cannister as I find these not very stable.
    >>
    >> I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on
    >> multi fuel. What
    >sort
    >> of stove should I go for?
    >>
    >> I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    >> have any
    >experience
    >> of this stove?
    >>
    >
    >Have a look at http://www.optimus.se/products/hiker/
    >
    >This is similar to the first stove I ever bought (I've got
    >the older 111 model). It will burn kerosene, white spirits
    >and meths.
    >
    >They are excellent stoves, very well made and very hot, but
    >they are on the heavy side. It came in useful when I moved
    >into my new house 6 weeks before the gas cooker arrived!!
    >

    I'm sure it is great to cook with but I would not want to
    carry it for any great length of time. But it is over a
    1.1kg heavier than my favourite lightweight cooking set =
    pot, stove, gas, matches, windbreak & spoon!

    I feel it was probably named the Hiker in the days when over
    1.5kg was par for the course for a portable stove.

    --

    http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/
     
  11. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Brian <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    > these not very stable.
    >
    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?
    >
    > I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    > have any experience of this stove?
    >

    Thanks for the replies. Seems that gas is most popular.

    Here is the stove that I currently have:

    http://www.sunnflair.com/sunngas/sg1057.gif

    The issue I have with gas stoves are that the gas cannisters
    are bulky, and you can't easily tell how much is left, and
    you have "empties" to dispose of.

    Think I'll do a bit more research. Not sure about meths
    stoves as I read that you cannot see if they are lit, and
    take too long to heat anything up.

    Petrol / Multifuel stoves need pumping to pressurise.

    The least hassle stove would be a simple gas stove with
    remote cannister.

    But I'll still do some more research, and hopefully hear
    some more info on stoves from you guys in uk.rec.walking.

    cheers

    --
    Brian
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brian <[email protected]> writes
    >Brian <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    >> gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    >> stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    >> these not very stable.
    >>
    >> I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on
    >> multi fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?
    >>
    >> I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    >> have any experience of this stove?
    >>
    >
    >Thanks for the replies. Seems that gas is most popular.
    >
    >Here is the stove that I currently have:
    >
    >http://www.sunnflair.com/sunngas/sg1057.gif
    >
    >The issue I have with gas stoves are that the gas
    >cannisters are bulky, and you can't easily tell how much is
    >left, and you have "empties" to dispose of.
    >
    >Think I'll do a bit more research. Not sure about meths
    >stoves as I read that you cannot see if they are lit,

    But you can tell very easily by putting your hand a foot or
    so above the burner. As long as you are aware that it is
    hard to see the flame you can factor that in.

    >and take too long to heat anything up.

    It depends. I often do other things like putting up the tent
    or sorting out some gear and it is boiled by the time I am
    ready. Sure my gas stoves (MSR Pocket Rocket & Edelred
    Scorpion) both boil faster, are easier to light and have
    more control but I still carry the Trangia sometimes.

    On my last backpack trip I carried the MSR and my son
    carried the Mini Trangia. Both meals were ready at almost
    the same time.

    >
    >Petrol / Multifuel stoves need pumping to pressurise.

    And have lots more to go wrong than a basic stove like a
    Trangia or a gas burner. They are also relatively heavy
    unless you are going on an extended trip where the fuel
    weight comes into consideration. And the cost a bob or two!

    >
    >The least hassle stove would be a simple gas stove with
    >remote cannister.

    My Edelred is like that but I don't carry it as often as the
    MSR because it is heavier. The MSR is a canister top stove
    but being aware of the instability issue I have never
    actually had a problem with it tipping over. I do always use
    pots with good handles though and that helps avoid mishaps.

    --

    http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/
     
  13. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Brian <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > stoves which fit on top of the gas cannister as I find
    > these not very stable.
    >
    > I had been thinking of getting a stove which runs on multi
    > fuel. What sort of stove should I go for?
    >
    > I have also looked at the mini trangia 28. Does anyone
    > have any experience of this stove?
    >

    Well after reading all the replies I think I'm either
    going to go for a gas stove with remote cannister, or a
    mini trangia.

    However, I may even order a Swedish Army Trangia stove,
    around £10 from various army surplus shops online. At that
    price if it isn't all that good, then not much lost!

    Still going to do a bit more research though.

    Any other suggestions?

    --
    Brian
     
  14. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Jim Ford" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > * Brian <[email protected]> deigned to grace
    > uk.rec.walking
    > * with their presence by declaiming:
    > > I have been thinking of replacing my cheap and cheerfull
    > > gas stove with something a bit better. I'm not keen on
    > > stoves which fit on top of the
    gas
    > > cannister as I find these not very stable.
    >
    > IMO avoid meths - It's got a low calorific value, it
    > stinks your kit out
    and
    > contaminates food if the storage container leaks, it
    > soots cooking
    utensils,
    > you can't properly control the flame, also the flame is
    > invisible in the sunlight - with attendant danger. I'm at
    > a loss as to why the Trangia is
    so
    > popular! Maybe it's because it's favoured by youth
    > groups for its
    robustness,
    > and folk that have been introduced to them this way tend
    > to stick with
    them
    > in the absence of knowing better.
    >

    Nope - I got a gas burner recently (incidentally, the
    thermotech one linked in the first reply) and it was
    rubbish; gas doesn't work well in the cold, and the delivery
    of fuel changes as the canister gets used up. All that
    shaking you have to do in the last third of the canister is
    a right royal PITA, and is difficult to do without toppling
    the whole lot. You can't tell very easily when it's going to
    run out, and all the gas systems I've ever used are very
    badly affected by the wind. Due to cold, wind, half-full
    canister, and an imperceptibly slight breath of wind, on my
    last trip it took 20 mins to boil a very small pan of water,
    and I had to watch it every second. Not a pleasant
    experience. Next time I go out bivying on my own in the
    spring, I will *not* rely on gas, and I'll take the extra
    weight gladly. But the gas stove'll be nice with the family.

    The Trangia is about the only thing that works better in the
    wind than not. It's also safe, stable, and very very
    reliable. You can leave it boiling while you put up/take
    down the tent, safe in the knowledge that it won't topple
    over, even on a slope (which is very far from my experience
    with gas!). There aren't any moving parts, which means it
    will go on forever, and simply won't go wrong. In terms of
    stinky & a contaminant - yes, but I'm not aware of any
    liquid fuel that isn't. That's why you screw the container
    tight and don't keep it near the food! For long trips it's
    not recommended as meths is heavy and bulky; but gas
    canisters will take up a similar amount of space; and it's
    far less easy to tell how much gas you've got left. It's
    popular with 'youth groups' because it's easy to use and
    will last out all the beatings you can give it. It's popular
    with the rest of us because it will not fail, which is
    important when you're on the side of hill in December.

    At the moment, I can't recommend gas, except in the porch of
    tent pitched on a flat piece of ground, on still day, in the
    summer, with a brand new canister; but each to their own.
     
  15. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    I prefer the MSR on petrol in winter. If festering for a
    long time, guilt free tea is a real plus. Being able to brew
    at will without worrying about the gas running out is very
    good news. I often do very long trips around New Year, (last
    year 14 days out) and I would soon run out of gas.

    Summer trips on the move, I use gas.

    Richard Webb
     
  16. C L Imber

    C L Imber Guest

    On 22 Apr 2004 09:43:28 GMT, Jim Ford <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >IMO avoid meths - It's got a low calorific value, it stinks
    >your kit out and contaminates food if the storage container
    >leaks, it soots cooking utensils, you can't properly
    >control the flame, also the flame is invisible in the
    >sunlight - with attendant danger. I'm at a loss as to why
    >the Trangia is so popular! Maybe it's because it's favoured
    >by youth groups for its robustness, and folk that have been
    >introduced to them this way tend to stick with them in the
    >absence of knowing better.

    A few years ago there was a tragic accident involving a
    primary school pupil and a Trangia Stove while on a
    school trip.

    The pupil told a trip assistant that his stove had gone out
    and it needed a refill. The assistant went to the main tent
    and got the half full 5 gallon meths can. As soon as he
    started to refill the stove, the can blew up spluttering
    burning meths all over the young child. The child suffered
    very severe burns, and probably only escaped with his live
    because the camp was close to East Grinstead and its famous
    burns unit.

    What has happened was this:
    1. The Trangia was not out, only appeared to be out. Meths
    burns with a blue flame.
    2. The half full meths can was stored in a warm tent. The
    *empty* half of the can was full of warm meths vapour.
    3. When the meths was poured, the vapour exploded, the
    rapid expansion caused by the explosion caused the can's
    structure to give way splattering the hapless boy with
    burning meths.

    Trangia now produce a gas stove as an option. They recommend
    filling meths stoves by a small flask with a safety cap.
     
  17. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Brian wrote:

    > http://www.sunnflair.com/sunngas/sg1057.gif
    >
    > The issue I have with gas stoves are that the gas
    > cannisters are bulky, and you can't easily tell how much
    > is left, and you have "empties" to dispose of.

    Gas cannisters aren't intrinsically worse than any other
    sort of fuel bottle, though. I find I can tell by weighing
    it in my hand and shaking it before I leave if I'm likely
    to be in danger of running dry, and in that case the can is
    relegated to a future car camping trip or home fondue where
    it doesn't matter if I run out and disposing of the empty
    one is a non-issue. Of course, you can only do this with
    self-sealing cartridges, but I'd very much recommend them
    in any case.

    > Think I'll do a bit more research. Not sure about meths
    > stoves as I read that you cannot see if they are lit, and
    > take too long to heat anything up.

    Shite for snow melting, certainly, but most cooking is time
    management. I was once mocked for using a trangia because
    they're so slow by someone with an MSR. I challenged him to
    a race, first one to hot dinner. I won 30 seconds later,
    because my dinner had been cooking safely on its own while
    we got camp set up, and he was still fiddling with his MSR
    when my dinner was getting eaten. A trangia can be left to
    its own devices more than any other stove as it won't flare,
    is largely unbothered by wind and is very stable. If you
    want to check if it's lit then just lower a match over the
    burner and see if it lights.

    > Petrol / Multifuel stoves need pumping to pressurise.

    That's not a problem as the pump is built into the fuel
    bottle adapter on most and it's just a few strokes. The real
    pain with them is priming before they get going which takes
    practice to do without flaring and small fireballs. It makes
    the stoves intrinsically far more dangerous to use in a
    tent. They also need more maintenance.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext.
    33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177
    Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  18. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Brian <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Well after reading all the replies I think I'm either
    > going to go for a gas stove with remote cannister, or a
    > mini trangia.
    >
    > However, I may even order a Swedish Army Trangia stove,
    > around £10 from various army surplus shops online. At that
    > price if it isn't all that good, then not much lost!
    >
    > Still going to do a bit more research though.
    >
    > Any other suggestions?
    >

    However, according to a websearch, the Swedish Army Trangias
    are very very heavy!

    So I'm leaning more towards the mini trangia.

    --
    Brian
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Ken wrote:

    > Nope - I got a gas burner recently (incidentally, the
    > thermotech one li=
    nked
    > in the first reply) and it was rubbish; gas doesn't work
    > well in the co=
    ld,

    There's gas and there's gas. The propane mixes readily
    available now=20 do cold significantly better than
    pure butane. Costs more, but works=20 better: you pays
    your money...

    > and the delivery of fuel changes as the canister gets
    > used up.

    Yes. But I haven't found this much of a problem in practice.

    > shaking you have to do in the last third of the canister
    > is a right roy=
    al
    > PITA, and is difficult to do without toppling the
    > whole lot.=20

    Never done this, still got plenty of use out of them...

    > You can't tell very easily when it's going to run out,

    What I do is shake the can before I go away to gauge how
    much is in it.=20
    If it seems like it's getting to the end I start a new one
    straight=20
    away and put the low one aside fro later use on car camping
    trips, where =

    it doesn't matter if it runs out as I'll have another with
    me anyway.

    > and all the gas systems I've ever used are very badly
    > affected by the wind.

    I use the Trangia gas conversion, and as with the Trangia in
    "native"=20 meths mode, it isn't really troubled much by the
    wind. The problem is=20 that the official product is
    ludicrously overpriced, but note that=20 Markill do
    something very similar for ~=A320.

    > The Trangia is about the only thing that works better in
    > the wind than =
    not.
    > It's also safe, stable, and very very reliable. You can
    > leave it boilin=
    g
    > while you put up/take down the tent, safe in the knowledge
    > that it won'=
    t
    > topple over, even on a slope (which is very far from my
    > experience with=

    > gas!).=20

    Maybe the trangia gas conversion is the one to change your
    mind. Most=20 of the basic advantages plus far more
    controllable output and none of=20 that bleedin' meths to
    stink the tent out, and basically no refuelling=20 to do in
    most cases. I use gas as my default, and I have a meths
    burner for my Trangia too,=20 and a Primus MFS if I want a
    pressurised turbojet, but gas is just=20 easier to use and
    IME works fine.

    Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382
    660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44
    1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
    [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. Andyp

    Andyp Guest

    > >Think I'll do a bit more research. Not sure about meths
    > >stoves as I read that you cannot see if they are lit,

    > But you can tell very easily by putting your hand a foot
    > or so above the burner. As long as you are aware that it
    > is hard to see the flame you can factor that in.

    If you add a bit of salt to meths it ought to make the flame
    easier to see if it's a worry for anyone. Ordinary salt
    (sodium ions) should make it yellow and that Lo Salt stuff
    (mostly potassium ions) should make it go lilac. I'll try it
    out at work tomorrow.
     
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