Strada workstand ideas?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Bill, Mar 24, 2003.

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  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I am trying to come up with a simple clever idea for a home-built workstand for a Strada recumbent,
    but it is not an easy bike to hold. Anyone got any great ideas?

    Please take the 7 out of my e-mail address if replying directly to me.

    Thanks,

    Bill
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I am trying to come up with a simple clever idea for a home-built workstand for a Strada
    > recumbent, but it is not an easy bike to hold. Anyone got any great ideas?

    I don't know how handy you are but I have a Park Deluxe Home Mechanic Repair Stand (PCS-4) with a
    100-5X Extreme Range Clamp for my Giro. http://www.parktool.com/tools/100_5X.shtml

    If you have ideas about building your own. I would suggest coming as close to this one as you can.

    --
    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  3. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Thanks Cletus. I guess I should have mentioned something. The balance point on my bike is under the
    front half of the seat. In front of that area, I will have a mount for a headlight battery. This
    means that I can not clamp to the frame tube at or near the balance point.

    Bill

    "Cletus D. Lee" wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > I am trying to come up with a simple clever idea for a home-built workstand for a Strada
    > > recumbent, but it is not an easy bike to hold. Anyone got any great ideas?
    >
    > I don't know how handy you are but I have a Park Deluxe Home Mechanic Repair Stand (PCS-4) with a
    > 100-5X Extreme Range Clamp for my Giro. http://www.parktool.com/tools/100_5X.shtml
    >
    > If you have ideas about building your own. I would suggest coming as close to this one as
    > you can.
    >
    > --
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  4. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    [This followup was posted to alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent and a copy was sent to the cited author.]

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Thanks Cletus. I guess I should have mentioned something. The balance point on my bike is under
    > the front half of the seat. In front of that area, I will have a mount for a headlight battery.
    > This means that I can not clamp to the frame tube at or near the balance point.

    Take a close look at the 100-5X clamp. It fits the Strada/Giro Monotube nicely. In addition to
    clamping top/bottom on the monotube, It also clamps on the sides and still provides some support
    beneath the frame as well.

    I have a RAM Mount for my GPS strapped to the Monotube just aft of the headset. Even though the
    balance point on the Giro is the same as your Strada, I find the Park Deluxe Repair Stand well
    balanced and will still support the bike with a long moment arm.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  5. Charles

    Charles Guest

    Bill,

    I use a Rothko stand that Rivendell Bicycle Works sells for $20.

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/webalog/tools/

    Charles

    Bill wrote:
    > I am trying to come up with a simple clever idea for a home-built workstand for a Strada
    > recumbent, but it is not an easy bike to hold. Anyone got any great ideas?
    >
    > Please take the 7 out of my e-mail address if replying directly to me.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Bill
    >
     
  6. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

  7. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I bought about $30 worth of 1" copper pipe today. I am either going to have a nice Strada stand soon
    or an expensive pile of copper junk.

    "Cletus D. Lee" wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > I am trying to come up with a simple clever idea for a home-built workstand for a Strada
    > > recumbent, but it is not an easy bike to hold. Anyone got any great ideas?
    >
    > I don't know how handy you are but I have a Park Deluxe Home Mechanic Repair Stand (PCS-4) with a
    > 100-5X Extreme Range Clamp for my Giro. http://www.parktool.com/tools/100_5X.shtml
    >
    > If you have ideas about building your own. I would suggest coming as close to this one as
    > you can.
    >
    > --
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  8. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Works very well. See it at: http://home.mchsi.com/~circ/light4b.jpg

    Bill wrote:

    > I bought about $30 worth of 1" copper pipe today. I am either going to have a nice Strada stand
    > soon or an expensive pile of copper junk.
    >
    > "Cletus D. Lee" wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > > I am trying to come up with a simple clever idea for a home-built workstand for a Strada
    > > > recumbent, but it is not an easy bike to hold. Anyone got any great ideas?
    > >
    > > I don't know how handy you are but I have a Park Deluxe Home Mechanic Repair Stand (PCS-4) with
    > > a 100-5X Extreme Range Clamp for my Giro. http://www.parktool.com/tools/100_5X.shtml
    > >
    > > If you have ideas about building your own. I would suggest coming as close to this one as you
    > > can.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  9. Bill looks like a good Idea I'd say you met your objective, now what did you use for the cradle
    parts? Denny in Sayre, Pa "bent but not broken" www.recumbentstuff.com

    >
    > Bill wrote:
    >
    > > I bought about $30 worth of 1" copper pipe today. I am either going to have a nice Strada stand
    > > soon or an expensive pile of copper junk.
    > > > Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > > > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  10. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Bill wrote:
    >
    > Works very well. See it at: http://home.mchsi.com/~circ/light4b.jpg

    Bill,

    Where is the Roho seat pad? Or do you find the Strada comfortable enough without the pad?

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  11. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Tom,

    I took the Roho off for the picture. I consider myself the poster child for R-Butt. If I use a Roho
    on a non-laid-back seat, I get it. If I use a laid back seat (including the Strada) without the
    Roho, I get it. The only way I ride in complete comfort is with a laid back seat AND a Roho.
    Unfortunately, Roho does not make the cushion I have, it was a prototype. They do make a small one
    for motorcycle seats that works pretty well, but not as well as the deeper one I have. A friend of
    mine has the motorcycle Roho on his V-Rex and he is 100% spoiled with it now. I have tried to
    convince Roho that there would be a market for the version I have, but they are not convinced, or at
    least not interested at this time in making them. They might custom make one, but it would probably
    cost $200 to $300. Mine is about 3 1/2 years old now and I hope it keeps going for a while!

    Bill

    Tom Sherman wrote:

    > Bill wrote:
    > >
    > > Works very well. See it at: http://home.mchsi.com/~circ/light4b.jpg
    >
    > Bill,
    >
    > Where is the Roho seat pad? Or do you find the Strada comfortable enough without the pad?
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  12. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Denny,

    I made the cradle brackets out of aluminum and UHMW polyethylene (see links below). I used silicon
    rubber (RTV) to attach a small section of aluminum pipe (conduit) to the underside of the frame tube
    to keep the bike from sliding down (see link below). The vertical pipe keeps the bike upright. I use
    a velcro strip to attach it to the seat. When not in use, the vertical tube can be pivoted down to
    save space by taking out a cotter pin.

    http://home.mchsi.com/~circ/stand2.jpg http://home.mchsi.com/~circ/stand3.jpg
    http://home.mchsi.com/~circ/stand4.jpg

    Bill

    Denny Voorhees wrote:

    > Bill looks like a good Idea I'd say you met your objective, now what did you use for the cradle
    > parts? Denny in Sayre, Pa "bent but not broken" www.recumbentstuff.com
    >
    > >
    > > Bill wrote:
    > >
    > > > I bought about $30 worth of 1" copper pipe today. I am either going to have a nice Strada
    > > > stand soon or an expensive pile of copper junk.
    > > > > Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > > > > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  13. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Thanks Andy, There are more pictures of the stand on the newsgroup now.

    I am a big believer in fenders. I had to buy 2 set of fenders, a road set for the front and a MTB
    for the rear. I think I got them from Bike Nashbar or Performance Bike.

    I use a stock tire on the front and a fatter tire on the rear. I ran time trials with this setup as
    well as with 2 stock tires and also with 2 650C tires (and rims). My average speeds were within 1
    mph. I really like the cushioned feel of the fat rear tire and I consider it much more durable and
    flat resistant.

    Another thing that I did to the bike that really worked out great is the tightly-focused 11 watt
    scanning headlight. You can see it in the first picture. It uses a servo motor for rotation. I have
    not quite completed my latest version. It will be about my 5th iteration of the scanning design. It
    uses a home-built digital regulator designed and built by my friend Mike. With the tightly focused
    11 watt beam, not only can you blind a deer, you can aim it at him! The spot is much more focused
    and intense than a 20 watt halogen MR16 spot bulb (I compared them). Since all of the light is in a
    small spot though, with very little stray light, it must have the ability to rotate or you are
    completely in the dark in the turns. With the rotating feature, it is amazing how well you can see
    with 11 watts. By the way, I use my cordless drill batteries for power.

    -------------------------------

    Bill

    Thanks for the pics of the Strada worstand...very nice!

    I also noted you have fenders on the bike. Can you tell me what kind they are? Especially on
    the front??

    Thanks for any help! Andy
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, Bill says...

    >I took the Roho off for the picture. I consider myself the poster child for R-Butt. If I use a
    >Roho on a non-laid-back seat, I get it. If I use a laid back seat (including the Strada) without
    >the Roho, I get it. The only way I ride in complete comfort is with a laid back seat AND a Roho.
    >Unfortunately, Roho does not make the cushion I have, it was a prototype. They do make a small
    >one for motorcycle seats that works pretty well, but not as well as the deeper one I have. A
    >friend of mine has the motorcycle Roho on his V-Rex and he is 100% spoiled with it now. I have
    >tried to convince Roho that there would be a market for the version I have, but they are not
    >convinced, or at least not interested at this time in making them. They might custom make one,
    >but it would probably cost $200 to $300. Mine is about 3 1/2 years old now and I hope it keeps
    >going for a while!

    Bill's comments got me to thinking. On my Vision VR-42 with the seat back I NEVER get the dreaded
    R-Butt. But on my rather upright Vision VR-32 I get R-Butt after an hour, and see about the same
    response on my upright LifeCycle exercize trainer.

    Knowing this, I have always assumed that I would not be happy on a design - like the Easy Racer -
    with a more upright seat. Anybody have any experience with this? Can you generalize about R-Butt, or
    is it too specific to the exact seat of the bike?

    Steve Christensen Midland, MI
     
  15. Jerry Rhodes

    Jerry Rhodes Guest

    Steve Christensen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Bill says...
    >
    ? Can you generalize about R-Butt, or is it too specific to the exact seat
    > of the bike?
    >
    Steve,

    I believe that R-Butt is "specific to the seater of the biker".

    It's been a long time since I was in Jr. High Physics but I think that it has something to do with
    the equation that goes something like this " ..........the mass of the ass ...................". May
    have something to do with handlebars or something.

    Jerry
     
  16. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    Steve Christensen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >>
    > Bill's comments got me to thinking. On my Vision VR-42 with the seat back I NEVER get the dreaded
    > R-Butt. But on my rather upright Vision VR-32 I get R-Butt after an hour, and see about the same
    > response on my upright LifeCycle exercize trainer.
    >
    > Knowing this, I have always assumed that I would not be happy on a design - like the Easy Racer -
    > with a more upright seat. Anybody have any experience with this? Can you generalize about R-Butt,
    > or is it too specific to the exact seat of the bike?
    >
    > Steve Christensen Midland, MI

    Steve, you have got it exactly right. There are plenty of recumbent cyclists who think this is a
    deep study, but it is really a no brainer. The more upright the seat, the greater the potential for
    recumbent butt. The more laid back the seat, the less potential for recumbent butt. You can actually
    do the experiment on your Vision VR-42. Get the seat all the way upright, ride for several hours and
    see what happens. Then lay your seat all the way back and do the same. Night and day. One caveat.
    There are some guys who have such hard butts or such thick fat padding in their derriere that they
    could ride all day on a fence rail and never feel a thing. These are the kind of guys that actually
    like the cobra seat on the Easy Racer. You and I with our Visions have the most comfortable seat
    ever invented. No other seat even comes close. But the Vision seat must be laid back to realize the
    full comfort. Once you have done that you are in nirvana.

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
  17. Ed, when I had my first Easy Racer Bike (TE) the Cobra seat did cause me to endure recumbo butt. On
    my subsequent ER bikes (GRR / Polished Alum and at present a GRR Ti) I went with a Kool Back and now
    a Rans seat on my Ti one. RB is no longer a problem for me. I in fact recline more on my GRR Ti. I
    too know what you all are experiencing (Comfort wise) on your Visions, as I had an R-40 and R-45.
    Once my Aero comes in, I'll be able to enjoy really laid back cycling! Can't wait!!! EZ Biker :)
    Pompano Beach, Fl. (GRR Ti, Tailwind and SOON, Bacchetta Aero Pilot)

    "Edward Dolan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]... Steve, you have got it exactly right. There
    are plenty of recumbent > cyclists who think this is a deep study, but it is really a no
    > brainer. The more upright the seat, the greater the potential for
    recumbent butt.
     
  18. I think it depends to some extent on how hard one is trying as well. On my Kingcycle, my arse would
    start to seize after an hour or so at racing levels of effort, but I could quite happily ride all
    day at touring speeds. This bike had the seat back at ~45 degrees; the seat was a tubular frame with
    nylon webbing "upholstery". I have found the more laid-back hard-shell seats to be much more
    comfortable - two hours racing on the Speedmachine gave no discomfort, and only a small amount after
    the same duration race on my Baron.

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  19. Cbb

    Cbb Guest

    Laid back is the way to avoid R-Butt. However the type of rider you are and the seat can help on
    more upright bikes. When I am working hard, trying to do a fast hour ride, I use my Glutes (butt
    mucles) considerably. On an upright seat there is considerable weight on those mucles which is what
    causes my butt to hurt when I try to ride fast on my BikeE. On my Optima Baron I can crank as hard
    and as long as I want without any difficulty. I think the Vision seat is poorly suited to an upright
    position due to its fairly small seat bottom, while it is a very comfortable laid back seat.
    Personally I find the hard shell seats to be even more comforable. Craig Optima Baron

    Steve Christensen <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Bill's comments got me to thinking. On my Vision VR-42 with the seat back I NEVER get the dreaded
    > R-Butt. But on my rather upright Vision VR-32 I get R-Butt after an hour, and see about the same
    > response on my upright LifeCycle exercize trainer.
    >
    > Knowing this, I have always assumed that I would not be happy on a design - like the Easy Racer -
    > with a more upright seat. Anybody have any experience with this? Can you generalize about R-Butt,
    > or is it too specific to the exact seat of the bike?
    >
    > Steve Christensen Midland, MI
     
  20. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    Craig wrote:

    > I think the Vision seat is poorly suited to an upright position due to its fairly small seat
    > bottom, while it is a very comfortable laid back seat. Personally I find the hard shell seats to
    > be even more comforable. Craig Optima Baron
    >
    >
    Folks who get the Vision with that great Vision seat will always want to be laid back. I have ridden
    my Vision with the seat upright but not for long. It needs to be laid back.

    As for hard shell seats, they can be comfy once you get about 2 inches of foam laid over it, but
    otherwise they are murder. The manufacturer never gets it right as far as padding is concerned. But
    I do think the recent advent of ever higher cranks which mandate a more laid back seating position
    is going to mean that more recumbent cyclists are going to be more comfy than ever. But you have
    still got to get the padding right. And those higher cranks can cause foot numbness, but that is
    another story.

    Ed Dolan - Minnesota
     
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