Strange Encounter

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by sandy saunders, Dec 6, 2005.

  1. While on my walk last Sunday from East Meon, Hampshire, I left the South
    Downs Way at Mercury Park and followed a footpath south on the western side
    of Combe Wood ....... or so I thought! I inadvertently took a left fork
    instead of right, and not long into the wood I reached a small area cleared
    of trees with what looked like graves. No headstones but randomly placed
    mounds of earth, some were obviously recent as fresh flowers had been placed
    on the mounds. My first thought was that it was an animal burial site, but
    on turning back to join the correct path, I noticed a sign for the South
    Downs Natural Burial Site. I was intrigued, so I did a search last night on
    Google, and there are some 200 of these burial sites around the UK. Those
    who wish can be buried there in a wicker cask/biodegradable 'box', back to
    nature so to speak, and have a tree planted at the spot.

    One of the strangest things I have come across on my many walks ...... could
    be a bit spooky though in the fading light!

    --
    sandy saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk
    email: saunders.sandy at ntlworld.com

    'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still
    brings the same excitement'
     
    Tags:


  2. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to sandy saunders

    >My first thought was that it was an animal burial site, but
    >on turning back to join the correct path, I noticed a sign for the South
    >Downs Natural Burial Site.


    sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    of Wasd'ale!
    --
    Mike Reid
    Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  3. > sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    > hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    > with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    > of Wasd'ale!


    It is certainly a very tranquil setting. There are also a couple of wooden
    benches amongst the trees surrounding the burial ground I passed, where
    close ones can relax in a woodland atmosphere.

    I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top of
    England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also wanted
    a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!

    --
    sandy saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk
    email: saunders.sandy at ntlworld.com

    'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still
    brings the same excitement'
     
  4. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to sandy saunders

    >I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top of
    >England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also wanted
    >a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!


    you would find out who your friends had been, how many would
    "process" the whisky first :)
    --
    Mike Reid
    Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, sandy saunders
    <[email protected]> writes
    >> sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    >> hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    >> with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    >> of Wasd'ale!

    >
    >It is certainly a very tranquil setting. There are also a couple of wooden
    >benches amongst the trees surrounding the burial ground I passed, where
    >close ones can relax in a woodland atmosphere.
    >
    >I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top of
    >England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also wanted
    >a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!
    >


    This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.

    I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5
    litres. Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could
    have an impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore
    think it important that the friends / family consider the current and
    future enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.

    In the case of my late wife, who had not made any requests, the majority
    on her ashes were buried conventionally and I took a small amount to be
    scattered very subtly in a few places that were special to her. I very
    much doubt that anybody not directly involved even noticed that there
    were any ashes left behind.

    Personally I am very happy to have the same thing done with my remains
    when I die...

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  6. On Tue, 06 Dec 2005 18:02:55 +0000, The Reid
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    | Following up to sandy saunders
    |
    | >My first thought was that it was an animal burial site, but
    | >on turning back to join the correct path, I noticed a sign for the South
    | >Downs Natural Burial Site.
    |
    | sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    | hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    | with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    | of Wasd'ale!

    As in Ilkley moor bart 'at
    Which ends "Then we shall all have eten thee"
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Sick of Premium SMS scams,
    SMS marketing, Direct marketing phone calls, Silent phone calls?
    Register with http://www.tpsonline.org.uk/tps/
    IME they work :)
     
  7. "Dave Fawthrop" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    On Tue, 06 Dec 2005 18:02:55 +0000, The Reid
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    | Following up to sandy saunders
    |
    | >My first thought was that it was an animal burial site, but
    | >on turning back to join the correct path, I noticed a sign for the South
    | >Downs Natural Burial Site.
    |
    | sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    | hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    | with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    | of Wasd'ale!

    As in Ilkley moor bart 'at
    Which ends "Then we shall all have eten thee"
    --
    Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Sick of Premium SMS scams,
    SMS marketing, Direct marketing phone calls, Silent phone calls?
    Register with http://www.tpsonline.org.uk/tps/
    IME they work :)

    More correctly "Ilkla moor baht 'at"
    and "etten"

    http://www.ilkley.org/iguide/baht.htm

    Roger (looking at t'moor through't bedroom window)
     
  8. AJH

    AJH Guest

    On Tue, 6 Dec 2005 19:01:26 +0000, Dominic Sexton
    <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    >I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    >out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5
    >litres.


    That's going to add to the weight of the daysack then.


    > Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could
    >have an impact on the enjoyment of the place by others.


    The funeral directors made a point of telling me to avoid spreading
    ashes when other people were visible.

    My experience of the malevolent one is that the ashes won't stay
    still, I will remain upwind and the visibility will be too low to
    worry about.

    AJH
     
  9. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    Dominic Sexton <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote
    >
    >This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.
    >
    >I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    >out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5
    >litres. Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could
    >have an impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore
    >think it important that the friends / family consider the current and
    >future enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.
    >
    >In the case of my late wife, who had not made any requests, the
    >majority on her ashes were buried conventionally and I took a small
    >amount to be scattered very subtly in a few places that were special to
    >her. I very much doubt that anybody not directly involved even noticed
    >that there were any ashes left behind.
    >
    >Personally I am very happy to have the same thing done with my remains
    >when I die...
    >

    My wife's ashes are scattered on the paths around Werneth Low, where we
    used to walk quite often, the dog used to love it there, too.
    I wrote her name in ashes on the grass at the side of the war memorial,
    but it had disappeared within a week or so, unlike the huge cross which
    somebody made, and which killed the grass off for months.

    I don't remember it being 5 litres though, that's more than a Party Can!

    I was up there today, and the light was brilliant for photography,
    although some shots were a dismal failure.
    There was a sad notice attached to the stile with a photograph of a
    Border Collie bitch which had been lost the previous day. I hope she
    turns up....
    --
    Gordon Harris
     
  10. Bob Mannix

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Dominic Sexton" <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, sandy saunders
    > <[email protected]> writes
    >>> sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    >>> hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    >>> with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    >>> of Wasd'ale!

    >>
    >>It is certainly a very tranquil setting. There are also a couple of
    >>wooden
    >>benches amongst the trees surrounding the burial ground I passed, where
    >>close ones can relax in a woodland atmosphere.
    >>
    >>I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top of
    >>England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also
    >>wanted
    >>a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!
    >>

    >
    > This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.
    >
    > I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    > out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5 litres.
    > Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could have an
    > impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore think it
    > important that the friends / family consider the current and future
    > enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.
    >


    This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep for
    comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    (so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a nice
    view. On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives all
    a bad name. I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount. What to do
    with the empty pot? Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
     
  11. Bob Mannix

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Dominic Sexton" <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, sandy saunders
    > <[email protected]> writes
    >>> sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    >>> hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    >>> with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    >>> of Wasd'ale!

    >>
    >>It is certainly a very tranquil setting. There are also a couple of
    >>wooden
    >>benches amongst the trees surrounding the burial ground I passed, where
    >>close ones can relax in a woodland atmosphere.
    >>
    >>I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top of
    >>England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also
    >>wanted
    >>a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!
    >>

    >
    > This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.
    >
    > I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    > out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5 litres.
    > Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could have an
    > impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore think it
    > important that the friends / family consider the current and future
    > enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.
    >


    This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep for
    comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    (so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a nice
    view. On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives all
    a bad name. I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount. What to do
    with the empty pot? Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
     
  12. Bob Mannix

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Dominic Sexton" <{d-sep03}@dscs.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, sandy saunders
    > <[email protected]> writes
    >>> sounds nicer than the crematorium, I fancy ashes scattered on a
    >>> hill, perhaps the older ones here should be making arrangements
    >>> with the younger ones. Yewbarrow for me. I could end up as a pint
    >>> of Wasd'ale!

    >>
    >>It is certainly a very tranquil setting. There are also a couple of
    >>wooden
    >>benches amongst the trees surrounding the burial ground I passed, where
    >>close ones can relax in a woodland atmosphere.
    >>
    >>I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top of
    >>England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also
    >>wanted
    >>a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!
    >>

    >
    > This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.
    >
    > I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    > out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5 litres.
    > Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could have an
    > impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore think it
    > important that the friends / family consider the current and future
    > enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.
    >


    This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep for
    comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    (so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a nice
    view. On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives all
    a bad name. I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount. What to do
    with the empty pot? Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, Bob Mannix
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    >their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    >towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep for
    >comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    >(so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a nice
    >view.


    That's excellent.

    >On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    >noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    >some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives all
    >a bad name.


    I do understand that it is an emotional time for people but like you say
    it is inconsiderate.

    > I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount.


    You and Gordon are most probably right. My guesstimate was based on the
    fact that I asked for about 1/3 to be kept out of the casket and guessed
    what I received was about 1 1/2 litres. I suppose I got more like 1/2
    than a 1/3.

    > What to do
    >with the empty pot?


    Now there is a quandary many folk have been in!

    > Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    >commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    I still have mine from 3 1/2 years ago and think your idea is excellent.
    The next time I'm at one of the special places I will be doing something
    very similar, thank you.

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>, Bob Mannix
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    >their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    >towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep for
    >comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    >(so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a nice
    >view.


    That's excellent.

    >On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    >noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    >some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives all
    >a bad name.


    I do understand that it is an emotional time for people but like you say
    it is inconsiderate.

    > I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount.


    You and Gordon are most probably right. My guesstimate was based on the
    fact that I asked for about 1/3 to be kept out of the casket and guessed
    what I received was about 1 1/2 litres. I suppose I got more like 1/2
    than a 1/3.

    > What to do
    >with the empty pot?


    Now there is a quandary many folk have been in!

    > Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    >commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    I still have mine from 3 1/2 years ago and think your idea is excellent.
    The next time I'm at one of the special places I will be doing something
    very similar, thank you.

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, Bob Mannix
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    >their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    >towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep for
    >comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    >(so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a nice
    >view.


    That's excellent.

    >On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    >noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    >some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives all
    >a bad name.


    I do understand that it is an emotional time for people but like you say
    it is inconsiderate.

    > I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount.


    You and Gordon are most probably right. My guesstimate was based on the
    fact that I asked for about 1/3 to be kept out of the casket and guessed
    what I received was about 1 1/2 litres. I suppose I got more like 1/2
    than a 1/3.

    > What to do
    >with the empty pot?


    Now there is a quandary many folk have been in!

    > Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    >commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    I still have mine from 3 1/2 years ago and think your idea is excellent.
    The next time I'm at one of the special places I will be doing something
    very similar, thank you.

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  16. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Wed, 7 Dec 2005 09:54:21 -0000, "Bob Mannix" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    Whilst not wanting to add to anyone's grief at a time such as this,
    there's light relief to be had too:

    >ashes scattered on Cat Bells.


    >On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    >noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just dumped
    >some ashes right on the top, on the path


    What a good idea, would help reduce erosion _and_ add to surety of
    footedness on an icy winter's day! Wha? They don't scatter ashes on
    icy footpaths round your way?


    My remains? I'd look forward to the barest minimum of palaver, I'd be
    happy with my carcass thrown onto my roof (while its still "mine" ;-)
    (the roof that is) for the birsds to pick clean. Certainly don't want
    any fuss but I recognise that funerals are for the bereaved so a tree
    on me 'ead would suit both I think; hazel preferrably but ground
    conditions prolly not ideal so a birch, ash or oak would be great!

    Would I (sic.) need a licence to have bluebells (a protected species)
    planted on me feet?
     
  17. Katherine

    Katherine Guest

    sandy saunders wrote:

    > While on my walk last Sunday from East Meon, Hampshire, I left the South
    > Downs Way at Mercury Park and followed a footpath south on the western side
    > of Combe Wood ....... or so I thought! I inadvertently took a left fork
    > instead of right, and not long into the wood I reached a small area cleared
    > of trees with what looked like graves. No headstones but randomly placed
    > mounds of earth, some were obviously recent as fresh flowers had been placed
    > on the mounds. My first thought was that it was an animal burial site, but
    > on turning back to join the correct path, I noticed a sign for the South
    > Downs Natural Burial Site. I was intrigued, so I did a search last night on
    > Google, and there are some 200 of these burial sites around the UK. Those
    > who wish can be buried there in a wicker cask/biodegradable 'box', back to
    > nature so to speak, and have a tree planted at the spot.
    >
    > One of the strangest things I have come across on my many walks ...... could
    > be a bit spooky though in the fading light!
    >
    >


    I have always said that I would like to be buried in a plain pine box
    and left to slowly decompose back into the earth. Perhaps that is
    because I am a gardener and love to build the soil. There is a company
    in the US that is establishing such cemetaries.

    Katherine
     
  18. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to Dominic Sexton

    >In the case of my late wife, who had not made any requests, the majority
    >on her ashes were buried conventionally and I took a small amount to be
    >scattered very subtly in a few places that were special to her.


    good advice.
    --
    Mike Reid
    Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Katherine wrote:

    > I have always said that I would like to be buried in a plain pine box
    > and left to slowly decompose back into the earth.


    How about hardboard, or even cardboard, rather than pine? Since those
    can use timber by-products rather than directly using planking it should
    be a little "greener", and your body will probably get to meet the worms
    a bit quicker for useful effect too.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. Bob Mannix

    Bob Mannix Guest

    <SteveO> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 7 Dec 2005 09:54:21 -0000, "Bob Mannix" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    > Whilst not wanting to add to anyone's grief at a time such as this,
    > there's light relief to be had too:
    >
    >>ashes scattered on Cat Bells.

    >
    >>On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    >>noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just
    >>dumped
    >>some ashes right on the top, on the path

    >
    > What a good idea, would help reduce erosion _and_ add to surety of
    > footedness on an icy winter's day! Wha? They don't scatter ashes on
    > icy footpaths round your way?
    >
    >
    > My remains? I'd look forward to the barest minimum of palaver, I'd be
    > happy with my carcass thrown onto my roof (while its still "mine" ;-)
    > (the roof that is) for the birsds to pick clean. Certainly don't want
    > any fuss but I recognise that funerals are for the bereaved so a tree
    > on me 'ead would suit both I think; hazel preferrably but ground
    > conditions prolly not ideal so a birch, ash or oak would be great!
    >
    > Would I (sic.) need a licence to have bluebells (a protected species)
    > planted on me feet?
    >
    >
     
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