Strange Encounter

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by sandy saunders, Dec 6, 2005.

  1. Bob Mannix

    Bob Mannix Guest

    Sorry, hit send by mistake before!

    "Bob Mannix" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > <SteveO> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On Wed, 7 Dec 2005 09:54:21 -0000, "Bob Mannix" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Whilst not wanting to add to anyone's grief at a time such as this,
    >> there's light relief to be had too:


    No problem

    >>
    >>>ashes scattered on Cat Bells.

    >>
    >>>On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    >>>noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just
    >>>dumped
    >>>some ashes right on the top, on the path

    >>
    >> What a good idea, would help reduce erosion _and_ add to surety of
    >> footedness on an icy winter's day! Wha? They don't scatter ashes on
    >> icy footpaths round your way?
    >>


    I believe Wainwright described Haystacks top as "gritty and grittier still
    when the author's ashes are scattered here".

    Some people might be sensitive to such things though, so why make it a
    problem?


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
     


  2. Geoff Berrow

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    Message-ID: <[email protected]> from Bob Mannix
    contained the following:

    >Some people might be sensitive to such things though, so why make it a
    >problem?


    I tend to find myself walking through all manner of unsavoury things,
    particularly near farm gates. I don't see a few ashes as being a
    problem especially if they help me keep upright.

    --
    Geoff Berrow (put thecat out to email)
    It's only Usenet, no one dies.
    My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
    Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
     
  3. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to Peter Clinch

    >and your body will probably get to meet the worms
    >a bit quicker for useful effect too.


    impatience isn't a problem when you are dead :)
    --
    Mike Reid
    Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
  4. Bob Hobden

    Bob Hobden Guest

    <SteveO>
    > wrote: ((Snip))


    > My remains? I'd look forward to the barest minimum of palaver, I'd be
    > happy with my carcass thrown onto my roof (while its still "mine" ;-)
    > (the roof that is) for the birsds to pick clean.
    >


    Perhaps you should be a Parsi then...
    http://www.pemcom.demon.co.uk/queen/parsi.html

    Had a long chat with one in India and rather upset her by asking what
    happens to dead Parsis in countries without vultures like the UK and parts
    of the US. Unfortunately I didn't realise her son had emigrated to New York.
    Oops.
    She said they believe in reducing pollution from the dead to a minimum so
    the flesh is eaten by the birds and the bones are crushed up and scattered
    at sea.

    --
    Regards
    Bob
     
  5. sarah

    sarah Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katherine wrote:
    >
    > > I have always said that I would like to be buried in a plain pine box
    > > and left to slowly decompose back into the earth.

    >
    > How about hardboard, or even cardboard, rather than pine? Since those
    > can use timber by-products rather than directly using planking it should
    > be a little "greener", and your body will probably get to meet the worms
    > a bit quicker for useful effect too.


    I suspect more processing is needed to make cardboard. What's wrong with
    a woollen winding sheet? Easily biodegradeable as well as supporting
    local crafts and hillfarmers too :)

    regards
    sarah


    --
    Think of it as evolution in action.
     
  6. sarah

    sarah Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katherine wrote:
    >
    > > I have always said that I would like to be buried in a plain pine box
    > > and left to slowly decompose back into the earth.

    >
    > How about hardboard, or even cardboard, rather than pine? Since those
    > can use timber by-products rather than directly using planking it should
    > be a little "greener", and your body will probably get to meet the worms
    > a bit quicker for useful effect too.


    I suspect more processing is needed to make cardboard. What's wrong with
    a woollen winding sheet? Easily biodegradeable as well as supporting
    local crafts and hillfarmers too :)

    regards
    sarah


    --
    Think of it as evolution in action.
     
  7. > This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.

    Cheers Dominic ........

    > I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    > out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5 litres.
    > Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could have an
    > impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore think it
    > important that the friends / family consider the current and future
    > enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.


    I must admit I have no idea as to the quantity of ashes after a cremation.
    Clare certainly woudn't be lugging that amount up Scafell Pike. No, it
    would have to be a small tin, then maybe a small tin on many of my favourite
    walking 'sites'.

    > In the case of my late wife, who had not made any requests, the majority
    > on her ashes were buried conventionally and I took a small amount to be
    > scattered very subtly in a few places that were special to her. I very
    > much doubt that anybody not directly involved even noticed that there were
    > any ashes left behind.


    I would want Clare to be a little discrete ........ and probably she would
    want to be alone, other than friends/sons who may acompany her.

    > Personally I am very happy to have the same thing done with my remains
    > when I die...


    After many years in the Royal Navy, I always wanted my ashes scatter at sea
    on a Sunday afternoon when it is rough. Let the blighters experience a bit
    of what I lived through .......... However, my love of the hills took off,
    so now its to the top of a mountain.

    --
    sandy saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk
    email: saunders.sandy at ntlworld.com

    'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still
    brings the same excitement'
     
  8. > This is not specifically aimed at you Sandy or anybody else here.

    Cheers Dominic ........

    > I expect a lot of people don't realise just how big a box of ashes come
    > out of the crematorium - in my experience it was probably about 5 litres.
    > Putting that all in one place, even spread about a bit, could have an
    > impact on the enjoyment of the place by others. I therefore think it
    > important that the friends / family consider the current and future
    > enjoyment of a place that was special to their loved one.


    I must admit I have no idea as to the quantity of ashes after a cremation.
    Clare certainly woudn't be lugging that amount up Scafell Pike. No, it
    would have to be a small tin, then maybe a small tin on many of my favourite
    walking 'sites'.

    > In the case of my late wife, who had not made any requests, the majority
    > on her ashes were buried conventionally and I took a small amount to be
    > scattered very subtly in a few places that were special to her. I very
    > much doubt that anybody not directly involved even noticed that there were
    > any ashes left behind.


    I would want Clare to be a little discrete ........ and probably she would
    want to be alone, other than friends/sons who may acompany her.

    > Personally I am very happy to have the same thing done with my remains
    > when I die...


    After many years in the Royal Navy, I always wanted my ashes scatter at sea
    on a Sunday afternoon when it is rough. Let the blighters experience a bit
    of what I lived through .......... However, my love of the hills took off,
    so now its to the top of a mountain.

    --
    sandy saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk
    email: saunders.sandy at ntlworld.com

    'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still
    brings the same excitement'
     
  9. Rob Devereux

    Rob Devereux Guest

    "The Reid" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Following up to sandy saunders
    >
    > >I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top

    of
    > >England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also

    wanted
    > >a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!

    >
    > you would find out who your friends had been, how many would
    > "process" the whisky first :)


    Strangely that was going to be my comment when you said you wanted to be
    scattered on Yewbarrow - it doesnt bear to think what you'd end up getting
    mixed up with.

    Rob
     
  10. Rob Devereux

    Rob Devereux Guest

    "The Reid" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Following up to sandy saunders
    >
    > >I said to my wife Clare that I want my ashes placed under a rock on top

    of
    > >England, Scafell Pike. Wasn't too keen on the idea though, as I also

    wanted
    > >a large dram of finest malt whiskey poured over me every New Year's Eve!

    >
    > you would find out who your friends had been, how many would
    > "process" the whisky first :)


    Strangely that was going to be my comment when you said you wanted to be
    scattered on Yewbarrow - it doesnt bear to think what you'd end up getting
    mixed up with.

    Rob
     
  11. Rob Devereux

    Rob Devereux Guest

    > This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    > their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    > towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep

    for
    > comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    > (so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a

    nice
    > view. On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    > noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just

    dumped
    > some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives

    all
    > a bad name. I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount. What to do
    > with the empty pot? Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    > commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    This definitely deserves some kind of reality TV series! I dont mean to be
    rude to anyone who has lost a loved one but the pictures of people all
    setting off to the hills to dispose of the remains of their relatives and
    then bits being caught up on the bottom of people's boots and urns going in
    the local rubbish is just too much ...
     
  12. Rob Devereux

    Rob Devereux Guest

    > This is true but one can do the deed sensitively. Both my parents wanted
    > their ashes scattered on Cat Bells. My brother and I dropped off the top
    > towards the lake and then continued north until the slope got too steep

    for
    > comfortable picnicking etc and scattered the ashes in the (longish) grass
    > (so they disappeared) in an area where people didn't go anyway, with a

    nice
    > view. On the second trip we were walking over the bare windswept top and
    > noticed it was crunchy underfoot. Some inconsiderate p*ll*ck had just

    dumped
    > some ashes right on the top, on the path - which is a bit off and gives

    all
    > a bad name. I would have said 2-3 litres was more the amount. What to do
    > with the empty pot? Washed it out in Derwentwater and then dumped it in a
    > commercial wheelie-bin in Keswick.


    This definitely deserves some kind of reality TV series! I dont mean to be
    rude to anyone who has lost a loved one but the pictures of people all
    setting off to the hills to dispose of the remains of their relatives and
    then bits being caught up on the bottom of people's boots and urns going in
    the local rubbish is just too much ...
     
  13. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Wed, 7 Dec 2005 16:24:51 -0000, "Bob Hobden" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    ><SteveO>
    >> wrote: ((Snip))

    >
    >> My remains? I'd look forward to the barest minimum of palaver, I'd be
    >> happy with my carcass thrown onto my roof (while its still "mine" ;-)
    >> (the roof that is) for the birsds to pick clean.
    >>

    >
    >Perhaps you should be a Parsi then...


    Aye that's them, like the idea, but it seems they're non-prosalit...
    non-proseletis.... don't take converts. Besides they use the "F"
    word which doesn't sit kindly with me.









    F[aith]

    Absolutely no offence to those that have chosen that path for
    themselves but I have chosen my own.
     
  14. Alan Vann

    Alan Vann Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > How about hardboard, or even cardboard, rather than pine?


    I lost an uncle a couple of months back. For years, his joke had been
    "Just put me in a cardboard box....". When the undertaker heard it was
    to be a cremation, he told them about the 'Eco-Coffin', which turned out
    to be...... a cardboard box.

    He was ex-Army and entitled to a flag, but it wasn't quite big enough to
    completely cover the coffin. The brown packing tape was a nice touch,
    pity he wasn't there to see it, he would have loved it!

    The ashes were scattered on the North York Moors, in amongst the
    heather, well away from any path.

    Alan


    --
    Warning! - This newsgroup may contain nuts....
    Mail sent to this address might get read....Eventually
     
  15. Katherine

    Katherine Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:

    > Katherine wrote:
    >
    >> I have always said that I would like to be buried in a plain pine box
    >> and left to slowly decompose back into the earth.

    >
    >
    > How about hardboard, or even cardboard, rather than pine? Since those
    > can use timber by-products rather than directly using planking it should
    > be a little "greener", and your body will probably get to meet the worms
    > a bit quicker for useful effect too.
    >
    > Pete.


    Good idea. I think I had the image of the Old West' boothills.

    Katherine
     
  16. Chris Hill

    Chris Hill Guest

    On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 13:13:09 +0000, Peter Clinch <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Katherine wrote:
    >
    >> I have always said that I would like to be buried in a plain pine box
    >> and left to slowly decompose back into the earth.

    >
    >How about hardboard, or even cardboard, rather than pine? Since those
    >can use timber by-products rather than directly using planking it should
    >be a little "greener", and your body will probably get to meet the worms
    >a bit quicker for useful effect too.
    >
    >Pete.


    No, no, no! Hardboard and cardboard contain nasty additives, but pine is
    pure and therefore completely green (it is a crop, of course, and the more
    you use, the more gets planted. A mahogany coffin would be a different
    matter).


    --

    Chris Hill
     
  17. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > When the undertaker heard it was
    > to be a cremation, he told them about the 'Eco-Coffin', which turned out
    > to be...... a cardboard box.
    >
    > He was ex-Army and entitled to a flag, but it wasn't quite big enough to
    > completely cover the coffin. The brown packing tape was a nice touch,
    > pity he wasn't there to see it, he would have loved it!
    >
    >

    Sounds great. Was it marked "Return to Sender"?
    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  18. Chris Hill <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > No, no, no! Hardboard and cardboard contain nasty additives, but pine is
    > pure and therefore completely green (it is a crop, of course, and the more
    > you use, the more gets planted. A mahogany coffin would be a different
    > matter).
    >
    >


    You can have Wicker, I think. Don't know whether that's treated with
    anything nasty during drying, but it's more open than planking.

    -adrian
     
  19. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Thu, 8 Dec 2005 07:36:01 +0000, Adrian Godwin
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Chris Hill <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> No, no, no! Hardboard and cardboard contain nasty additives, but pine is
    >> pure and therefore completely green (it is a crop, of course, and the more
    >> you use, the more gets planted. A mahogany coffin would be a different
    >> matter).
    >>
    >>

    >
    >You can have Wicker, I think. Don't know whether that's treated with
    >anything nasty during drying, but it's more open than planking.
    >
    >-adrian


    Cardboard might be OK - it depends on the adhesives used - though its
    manufacture relies fairly heavily on big, oily machines.
    --

    Paul Rooney
     
  20. The Reid

    The Reid Guest

    Following up to Rob Devereux

    >Strangely that was going to be my comment when you said you wanted to be
    >scattered on Yewbarrow - it doesnt bear to think what you'd end up getting
    >mixed up with.


    Well, if you take a mildly Buddhist attitude, surely the sooner
    you are mixed the soomer you are reincarnated!
    --
    Mike Reid
    Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email [email protected] this site
    Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
     
Loading...
Loading...