Strange Encounter

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simonb, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote in news:brk0i1-h7b.ln1
    @gododdin.internal.jasmine.org.uk:

    > There's usually one a year. He (always he) drives his new
    > 4x4 out onto the sand at low tide. And gets it stuck. And
    > the tide comes in. This year's Suzuki Grand Vitara was
    > three *days* old when it was immersed...
    >

    I've seen this happen a couple of times, once at Burntisland
    (also a Suzuki Vitara, back before they were "Grand" though)
    and once at Cramond during the World Albacore Sailing
    Championships. This was a stuck Landrover having to get
    pulled out by a Landrover which in turn got stuck. In the
    end I think the second Landy was pulled out with a rope and
    a bunch of heavy buggers!

    Graeme
     


  2. [email protected] (Dave Kahn) writes:

    >McBain_v1 <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...

    >> Good for you :D Sounds like this particular arsehole
    >> expected the cyclist to be cowed into submission by some
    >> neathanderthal bellowing from the window of his pollution
    >> machine.

    >By wheeling his bike back and confronting the driver Simon
    >transformed himself from inferior being who must be
    >instantly overtaken to obviously fit and confident bloke of
    >superior height invading portable personal territory.
    >That's why the driver's behaviour changed instantly from
    >aggressive to submissive. It really is a jungle out there.

    I was once harassed on my motorcycle by a bloke in some
    small red four-wheeled thing. I simply ignored him while
    carefully keeping just beyond reach of his aggressive
    manoeuvres, which is easy at city speeds on any but the
    smallest motorcycles. He had his girl friend beside him. We
    soon parted company.

    A few minutes later I parked my bike at a bike park, and
    started walking towards my destination shop. It was a cold
    day, so I kept on all my bike gear, including helmet. I'm a
    small chap, but biking gear makes you look tougher. It
    turned out I was walking towards the bloke and his girl, who
    must also have parked nearby. He spotted me approaching them
    about 20 yards away, and he immediately turned and fled at
    high speed dragging the girl along behind him.

    Reminded me of those dogs, separated by a fence, who will
    run along on either side of it cursing and swearing at the
    top of their lungs at each other, and then when they come to
    the gap in the fence it's <gulp!> and flee.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  3. Bens

    Bens Guest

    On Tue, 9 Mar 2004 17:47:12 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Chris
    Malcolm) wrote:

    >I was once harassed on my motorcycle by a bloke in some
    >small red four-wheeled thing. I simply ignored him while
    >carefully keeping just beyond reach of his aggressive
    >manoeuvres, which is easy at city speeds on any but the
    >smallest motorcycles. He had his girl friend beside him. We
    >soon parted company.
    >
    >A few minutes later I parked my bike at a bike park, and
    >started walking towards my destination shop. It was a cold
    >day, so I kept on all my bike gear, including helmet. I'm a
    >small chap, but biking gear makes you look tougher. It
    >turned out I was walking towards the bloke and his girl,
    >who must also have parked nearby. He spotted me approaching
    >them about 20 yards away, and he immediately turned and
    >fled at high speed dragging the girl along behind him.

    It's funny isn't it? I've experienced it myself, it's
    amazing to see peoples faces change as the realisation that
    you're wearing full body armour dawns on them.
    --
    "We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to
    prevent life escaping from us." http://www.bensales.com
     
  4. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

  5. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 11:05:21 GMT someone who may be Simon Brooke
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >The other, much rarer, breed of suburban 4x4 driver causes
    >even more hilarity in the summer. There's usually one a
    >year. He (always he) drives his new 4x4 out onto the sand
    >at low tide. And gets it stuck. And the tide comes in.

    The last time I watched the water come in at Holy Island I
    saw a man in one of these cars who appeared to think that
    the signs regarding tide times did not apply to him. The
    water rises at visible speed there, due to a combination of
    factors. He got a little way along the road before he
    thought better of it.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number
    F566DA0E I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK
    government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  6. Marc

    Marc Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > The last time I watched the water come in at Holy Island I
    > saw a man in one of these cars who appeared to think that
    > the signs regarding tide times did not apply to him. The
    > water rises at visible speed there, due to a combination
    > of factors. He got a little way along the road before he
    > thought better of it.
    >
    In which direction?
     
  7. On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 00:46:47 +0000, David Hansen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The last time I watched the water come in at Holy Island I
    > saw a man in one of these cars who appeared to think that
    > the signs regarding tide times did not apply to him. The
    > water rises at visible speed there, due to a combination
    > of factors. He got a little way along the road before he
    > thought better of it.

    In Stanhope there is a ford across the river Wear, though
    there is also a bridge but the route is slightly longer (200
    yards each way?) There are very, very prominent warning
    signs that the ford should only be used when the water
    levels are low. A deliver driver a few of weeks ago decided
    that as his vehicle was high the ford would be okay even
    though the river was in spate. Needless to say the lorry
    ground to a halt half way across. It got even funnier as the
    river was such a torrent that the driver and his mate
    couldn't get out and the rescue services couldn't even get
    to them safely by boat. In the end they were winched out by
    helicopter. I'm not sure if they still work as delivery men.

    There's a photo at (the article questions whether the rescue
    was over the top):

    http://tinyurl.com/27t57

    redirects to:eek:ntent_objectid=13861215_method=full_siteid=50081_headline=-
    Rescue-operation-at-ford-under-fire-name_page.html>

    The council are reviewing the status of the ford:

    http://www.durham.gov.uk/durhamcc%5Cpressrel.nsf/0/77F8A0B3-
    064D088F80256E21005A0950?OpenDocument

    ObCycling: Avoid the ford!

    Colin
    --
     
  8. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 08:38:48 -0000 someone who may be marc
    <marccdimspamremovedimspamto [email protected]> wrote
    this:-

    >> The last time I watched the water come in at Holy Island
    >> I saw a man in one of these cars who appeared to think
    >> that the signs regarding tide times did not apply to him.
    >> The water rises at visible speed there, due to a
    >> combination of factors. He got a little way along the
    >> road before he thought better of it.
    >>
    >In which direction?

    He was attempting to leave.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number
    F566DA0E I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK
    government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  9. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    David Hansen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > The last time I watched the water come in at Holy Island I
    > saw a man in one of these cars who appeared to think that
    > the signs regarding tide times did not apply to him. The
    > water rises at visible speed there, due to a combination
    > of factors. He got a little way along the road before he
    > thought better of it.

    There's plenty of entertainment to be got down by the tidal
    Thames when it's in flood in the Twickenham / Marble Hill
    area. People look at the warning signs when they park
    (presumably) but just don't believe the river can come up
    that high that quickly. Cycling along the towpath when it's
    just becoming submerged is just about possible but decidedly
    dodgy as it's all too easy to wander off the path into the
    river proper.

    --
    Dave...
     
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