Strange Feeling Below??



alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
12,596
310
0
quenya said:
Go get a bike fit at a shop, they will get you set up correctly and will likely put you on a few different saddles. Buying a new saddle will probably not fix the problem, the problem is your fit on the bike. The saddle, pedals, and handlebar all need to be in the right places!

You might need a new stem more than a new saddle!

Don't waste money on a new part until you've identified that part as being the problem!

He's had a fit done. It looks as if he may have an underlying physical issue....may have.
 

quenya

Member
Jan 14, 2010
411
6
18
alienator said:
He's had a fit done. It looks as if he may have an underlying physical issue....may have.

I must have missed that post, was it in this thread?
 

hod65

New Member
Jun 24, 2009
221
0
0
alienator said:
No, it was in a post re: back pain.
i think the saddle may be the answer if everything else is right after all thats the contact point for your rear end just my own exspirience the cut out made a significant difference
 

blankcarbon_ian

New Member
Jul 22, 2010
7
0
0
Take this very seriously. Putting too much pressure on the manjunk behind your other junk can mess with erections. Find those bones in your ass and put the weight there...

:)
 

P2808

New Member
Jul 26, 2010
2
0
0
I was having the same problem, then I realized it was getting caught in the spokes.... :D
 

Kg4fxg

New Member
Sep 20, 2010
15
0
0
 
OK,
 
I posted also in another forum, I was not sure what the best Forum would be for these questions.
 
I want to get into biking again. So I buy a Trek FX 7.9 and a Kurt Kinetic Trainer. I love spinning classes. The 7.9 has racing tires and of course Carbon Frame.
 
This is embarrassing.....
 
What should I do with it? Ride on paved bike paths, streets, etc? What should I do to be careful of those skinny race tires? Can I add a rear carrier just for a bag to carry a lunch?
 
This has those straight handle bars, can I add an accessory to them the same as they do on the drop handle bars? Down the road would it be possible to add drop handle bars to this bike?
 
I guess what I am asking is now that I have this thing, what are my limits? Was this not a good bike to purchase? And can I correct any mistakes by changing out gear?
 
I would love to take it places to ride via car carrier in the receiver hitch which is a Saris by the way. Like bike paths that are blacktop, no mountain biking of course.
 
Any tips on locking it on the car? What do you all do when you buy a bike that costs around $2,500? Don't worry about locks, just never leave it?
 
Thanks
Bill
 

64Paramount

Well-Known Member
Jul 25, 2009
1,640
62
0
 
Originally Posted by Kg4fxg .

 
OK,
 
I posted also in another forum, I was not sure what the best Forum would be for these questions.
 
I want to get into biking again. So I buy a Trek FX 7.9 and a Kurt Kinetic Trainer. I love spinning classes. The 7.9 has racing tires and of course Carbon Frame.
 
This is embarrassing.....
 
What should I do with it? Ride on paved bike paths, streets, etc? What should I do to be careful of those skinny race tires? Can I add a rear carrier just for a bag to carry a lunch?
 
This has those straight handle bars, can I add an accessory to them the same as they do on the drop handle bars? Down the road would it be possible to add drop handle bars to this bike?
 
I guess what I am asking is now that I have this thing, what are my limits? Was this not a good bike to purchase? And can I correct any mistakes by changing out gear?
 
I would love to take it places to ride via car carrier in the receiver hitch which is a Saris by the way. Like bike paths that are blacktop, no mountain biking of course.
 
Any tips on locking it on the car? What do you all do when you buy a bike that costs around $2,500? Don't worry about locks, just never leave it?
 
Thanks
Bill

Congrats on your purchase!
 
Yes, with skinny tires you probably should avoid riding off road, but you're good to go on paved streets and paths. Just air the tires up properly and visually check to make sure there aren't any pieces of glass, or other debris stuck in the tread that could cause a flat each time before you ride.
 
You can add whatever accessories you wish whether it's a rear rack, different handlebars, etc...it's your bike. However, if you decide you would prefer a different style of bike it might be cheaper to buy one than to modify yours into a different bike. If you want a hybrid, buy a hybrid. If you want a road bike, buy a road bike.
 
I personally don't leave my car/bike unattended when I have the bike on the carrier, perhaps some other folks will comment on this. With the Saris trailer hitch style carrier you have you can at least lock the carrier to the receiver...just like you would a regular ball trailer hitch. I'm not sure about locking the bike to the carrier.
 
 
 

JoelS79

New Member
Sep 16, 2010
6
0
0
If my bike is mounted on the carrier, and I need to step away from it (to go inside a store for a drink after a ride or something), I'll lock it to my car's spoiler. If someone REALLY wants the bike, they can still get it, but I don't ride/live in an area where bike theft is a big problem, so locking it to the spoiler is more than enough to prevent your average thief from riding off on the bike. If you don't have a spoiler, get a steel line long enough to loop to the chassis under the car. There should be something you can hook it to that won't cause problems (like around the hitch mounts).
 
I wish I could tell you what you can't/can install on the bike, but I have a 7.3FX, and it's pretty well compatible with a lot of the commuter type accessories out there. Considering the CF frame, I'm not sure there are similar mount points on your bike compared to mine, but it's possible. You can pose that question to Trek. However, like the guy above said, I wouldn't waste the money/time to convert the bike to something it's not. If you wanted a road bike with drop handlebars, you should've gotten one, can't say I understand the logic of dropping $2.5K on a bike only to convert it to something you could've gotten for around the same price. Still, the FX series bikes are fast enough to hang with road bikes if you're fit enough, so I really can't see a reason to modify it.
 
As far as WHERE to ride, common sense should come in handy here. You wouldn't climb a mountain in loafers would you? Short jaunts on a packed gravel road should be ok (there are some stretches of path like that here, and I see the occasional road bike on 'em), but don't go overboard.
 

oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
3,233
194
48
70
Yeah, I think the 7.9 FX is a bit of overkill for a hybrid, but, hey, every FX is a wonderful bike. So enjoy it.

Regarding wheels and tires, I never let lightweight wheels come between me and finding interesting places to ride. All of my road bikes have seen hundreds of miles of dirt road with no bad consequences. You may want to swap in a slightly fatter tire, though. The shop that sold you the bike can show you what's appropriate.
 

baker3

Member
Jul 13, 2009
347
8
18
Originally Posted by oldbobcat .

Yeah, I think the 7.9 FX is a bit of overkill for a hybrid, but, hey, every FX is a wonderful bike. So enjoy it.

Regarding wheels and tires, I never let lightweight wheels come between me and finding interesting places to ride. All of my road bikes have seen hundreds of miles of dirt road with no bad consequences. You may want to swap in a slightly fatter tire, though. The shop that sold you the bike can show you what's appropriate.
It is amazing how tuff road wheels are, races like Paris–Roubaix are prime examples of the punishment a road wheel can take!
 

kdelong

Well-Known Member
Dec 14, 2006
3,477
134
48
I don't ride Trek so I'm not going to comment on the bike. You can lock the bike fairly easily for short periods of time. Lock your rack into the receiver like you would a ball hitch. For the bike, get a regular cable lock, the longer the better. Run the cable through the wheels and frame and through the bike rack and lock it. Make sure that the lock is not going to hit your bike. My lock is rubberized and I still tie it to the rack frame to keep it from swinging around while I am driving. This will protect your bike unless you leave it for extended periods of time, or unless the bike thieves in your area carry bolt cutters and/or hack saws. Oh, you will want to remove any bike bags, computers, and frame pumps and keep them in the car.

For a rack, there are a lot of racks that clamp onto your seat post with a cam release similar to quick releases that are used on some seat post binders. They don't hold a lot of weight but they will easily hold 10 - 20 lbs. Topeak makes a good one.