Street furniture, footpath furniture

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by [email protected], Mar 12, 2005.

  1. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Clive Coleman wrote:
    > that doesn't mean we all or even 1% of us are prepared to
    > contemplate a heart attack where next to no public transport exists.


    Large numbers do as they sit in their cars. Cyclists are healthier and
    live longer on average than the general population. Drivers on the
    other hand treble their chance of a heart attack as they sit in another
    traffic jam.

    Tony
     


  2. In message <[email protected]>, Tony Raven
    <[email protected]> writes
    >I thought it was the Troll Wall in Norway ;-)

    I have been in the Troll fjord, is there a connection?
    --
    Clive.
     
  3. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    Clive Coleman ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much
    like they were saying :

    >>> I'm glad you've chosen Wycombe and it's mole hills. Luckily for me
    >>> I have relatives that I visit there and the land is flat compared to
    >>> where I live.


    >>Where the hell do you live? Kathmandu? Machu Pichu?


    > No. Hint. Try Everest.


    Y'see - bloody cyclists. No idea of distances...

    How far IS Kathmandu from Everest, Clive?
     
  4. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    Clive Coleman ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much
    like they were saying :

    >>It's about the only place hillier than Wycombe?


    > You don't get out a lot apart from Wycombe do you.


    Yes.

    Christ, if I had to live *in* Wycombe, I think I'd top meself.

    I don't think I've EVER come across a town that's quite so soddin' steep in
    damn near every direction(1). The easiest way to put a bypass from Penn to
    the M40 would be to just put a bridge straight over - it'd rival the Viaduc
    du Millau (except for scenery)

    My brother was at Uni in Edinburgh - that's flatter.
    I grew up in/near Sheffield - that's flatter.

    (1) The A40 follows the bottom of the valley, so if you've only done
    Beaconsfield-Wycombe-West Wycombe I can see how you'd think it was
    flattish. And crap. You'd be right on the second point...
     
  5. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > James Annan wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> The point being that anyone who questions the existence of
    >> anthropogenically-forced climate change is utterly clueless.

    >
    >
    > That's what I like: a good open scientific mind of the type Galileo and
    > Bruno faced for their Copernican view that the sun might not revolve
    > around the earth.


    So presumably the jury is still out on that issue according to you.
    Along with whether the Earth is round and the Moon is made of cheese.

    > A good scientist should always question the accepted
    > paradigm. Theories are never proved, only disproved. You should read
    > Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.


    I'd take your protestations more seriously if you showed signs of having
    any interest in the truth. But all I see are paper-thin rationalisations
    of your existing prejudices. Why haven't you jumped out of a tall
    building to challenge the patriarchal construct of gravity?

    >
    > Tony the Clueless


    You said it.

    James
     
  6. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Phil Bradshaw wrote:
    > James Annan wrote:
    >


    >>
    >> The point being that anyone who questions the existence of
    >> anthropogenically-forced climate change is utterly clueless.

    >
    >
    > Until such time that the (any) accepted theory (mindset) is shown to be
    > wanting.


    Well if CO2 levels were shown to not be rising, or its absorption
    spectra were shown to be an atefact of a faulty method, then I would
    probably reconsider. Similarly, if apples started floating around, I
    would rethink my views on gravity.

    James
     
  7. >> It's only a bicycle - four year olds can ride the things.
    >
    > And a four year old can drive a car.


    Alright then, they're both so easy to drive/ride that I'd fall over
    laughing if a grown adult said they couldn't drive/ride one, although I'm
    getting horrible visions of Maureen from driving school.
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Clive Coleman wrote:
    > In message <[email protected]>, Tony Raven
    > <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >> I thought it was the Troll Wall in Norway ;-)

    >
    > I have been in the Troll fjord, is there a connection?


    The fjord is flat, the Wall is vertical.

    Tony
     
  9. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    Mark Thompson ([email protected]) gurgled happily,
    sounding much like they were saying :

    >>> It's only a bicycle - four year olds can ride the things.


    >> And a four year old can drive a car.


    > Alright then, they're both so easy to drive/ride that I'd fall over
    > laughing if a grown adult said they couldn't drive/ride one, although
    > I'm getting horrible visions of Maureen from driving school.


    The difference is that it's perfectly possible for somebody to be
    physically able to "drive" a car, but be nowhere near the standard required
    by law. Maureen's a fine case, and we've all got stories of
    friends/relatives who we'd avoid going in a car with in favour of an hour
    locked in a cage with John Prescott...

    But a bike, well, a four-year-old can ride one...
     
  10. Adrian

    Adrian Guest

    Clive Coleman ([email protected]) gurgled happily, sounding much
    like they were saying :

    >>>>Where the hell do you live? Kathmandu? Machu Pichu?


    >>> No. Hint. Try Everest.


    >> Y'see - bloody cyclists. No idea of distances...
    >>
    >> How far IS Kathmandu from Everest, Clive?


    > Next door.


    Right...

    So, unless the Everest you were referring to was actually the call centre
    for a double-glazing firm... *Ding* - You live in Basingstoke...?
     
  11. > Exercise is an unpleasant
    > necessity


    Aye, avoid stuff you don't like, and swap it for something you do. Ditch
    the gym and take up something that gives you some sort of enjoyment along
    with the exercise?
     
  12. In message <[email protected]>,
    Adrian <[email protected]> writes
    >So, unless the Everest you were referring to was actually the call
    >centre for a double-glazing firm... *Ding* - You live in
    >Basingstoke...?

    Not quite, try again.
    --
    Clive.
     
  13. James Annan wrote:
    > Phil Bradshaw wrote:
    >> James Annan wrote:
    >>> The point being that anyone who questions the existence of
    >>> anthropogenically-forced climate change is utterly clueless.

    >>
    >> Until such time that the (any) accepted theory (mindset) is shown to
    >> be wanting.

    >
    > Well if CO2 levels were shown to not be rising, or its absorption
    > spectra were shown to be an atefact of a faulty method, then I would
    > probably reconsider. Similarly, if apples started floating around, I
    > would rethink my views on gravity.


    If apples do start bobbing around, I'd suggest you had a look and checked if
    it's halloween before rethinking your views on gravity.

    I have to thank you for upholding this side of the argument, though. The
    less the assertions against greenhouse emissions are challenged, the less
    likely change is to happen, IMHO.

    A
     
  14. > But a bike, well, a four-year-old can ride one...

    Right, so the only limiting thing for riding a bike is being unable to
    physically control it, or not knowing the rules of the road. As Clive can
    do both he is indeed just giving up before he's started!
     
  15. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Adrian wrote:
    > I don't think I've EVER come across a town that's quite so soddin' steep in
    > damn near every direction(1). The easiest way to put a bypass from Penn to
    > the M40 would be to just put a bridge straight over - it'd rival the Viaduc
    > du Millau (except for scenery)


    The couple who lived in Wycombe have now moved to Cornwall... something
    about hills I think.

    > My brother was at Uni in Edinburgh - that's flatter.
    > I grew up in/near Sheffield - that's flatter.


    Two good examples. I live in the former, and went to uni in the latter.
    I cycle(d) round both. Hills are mostly in the mind and slightly in the
    legs.

    Jon
     
  16. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > The fjord is flat, the Wall is vertical.


    Is there a bridge near there?
     
  17. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Clive Coleman wrote:
    > I visited the web site kindly put here for me to see. As a Bristolian
    > I have visited Cornwall and can vouch that it isn't flat, but I can also
    > vouch that as you get older hills get steeper regardless of what you
    > believe. Just because some OAP fitness freaks want to ride up hill and
    > down dale, that doesn't mean we all or even 1% of us are prepared to
    > contemplate a heart attack where next to no public transport exists.


    As Tony mentioned, being an active cyclist reduces your chance of a
    heart attack. And the point of the veterans club anecdote was that just
    because you've retired, doesn't mean that you can't cycle anymore. You
    may not be able to just jump on a bike and ride with them, but that's
    not because you've got old... it's because you're not fit enough. The
    price we seem to pay for intelligence is the ability to think up limits
    for ourselves that simply don't exist. You've given up before you've
    even started.

    And as for PT failings. I'm well aware that there are places where the
    PT is crap (My parent's village being one), but this is not a universal
    truth for Britain. Much as it galls me to admit it, GNER have (IME)
    improved their standing this year WRT to arriving on time (Although
    their rates are still pretty steep). Using only a bike and PT I managed
    to travel from Edinburgh to St Malo in just under 24hours. Not only
    that, but I was able to read and relax all the way. So you see, I match
    your "Wouldn't work for me" and raise you by "Hasn't failed me yet". ;-)

    Jon
     
  18. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Steve Walker wrote:
    > Err, no, sorry, I'm an atheist, I don't want a copy of The Watchtower,
    > and if I felt God was trying to tell me something, I'd see a psychiatrist.
    >
    > What? Not religion?


    No. I direct contrast to most (all) religions, I can offer facts and
    figures, real experience and the ability to try before you buy. Heaven
    may not exist, but it's definitely faster to cycle Edinburgh than to
    drive it. ;-)

    Jon
     
  19. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Ambrose Nankivell wrote:

    > If apples do start bobbing around, I'd suggest you had a look and

    checked if
    > it's halloween before rethinking your views on gravity.


    :)

    >
    > I have to thank you for upholding this side of the argument, though.


    There are many others who do a more eloquent and patient job, but when
    such risible nonsense gets propagated in a generally useful ng, it
    needs to be shown for what it is.


    > The
    > less the assertions against greenhouse emissions are challenged, the

    less
    > likely change is to happen, IMHO.


    Well, there is certainly room for debate about the overall scale of the
    effects, and what action we should take. But those who deny the
    underlying reality demonstrate only that they are not acting in good
    faith.

    James
     
  20. James Annan wrote:
    > Phil Bradshaw wrote:
    > > James Annan wrote:
    > >

    >
    > >>
    > >> The point being that anyone who questions the existence of
    > >> anthropogenically-forced climate change is utterly clueless.

    > >
    > >
    > > Until such time that the (any) accepted theory (mindset) is shown to be
    > > wanting.

    >
    > Well if CO2 levels were shown to not be rising, or its absorption
    > spectra were shown to be an atefact of a faulty method, then I would
    > probably reconsider. Similarly, if apples started floating around, I
    > would rethink my views on gravity.
    >


    Can you define the causes of either, or for that matter friction (what
    causes the forces opposing motion)?
     
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