Strength and cycling controversy

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by 11ring, Apr 22, 2006.

  1. acoggan

    acoggan Member

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    At least in this case, yes.

    See my reply to velomanct re. measuring/determining maximal neuromuscular power.
     


  2. WarrenG

    WarrenG New Member

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    Only in your mind. The people who do, or may do the events (should) care most about what they need to do to prepare themselves for their best performance, not the entire population. Individual training for individual needs is best.
    In the face of clear evidence that shows your opinion to be contrary to the real world examples I provided this is what you come up with. Figures.
     
  3. WarrenG

    WarrenG New Member

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    IME, this is not true for everyone. We each have cadence ranges where we can produce our highest peak power and from a standing start there will be too much fatigue before some of us get up to the cadence where we can produce our highest peak power.
     
  4. Billsworld

    Billsworld New Member

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    Or do a standing start in whatever gear you want...makes sense. Roadies that are just interested in ft,np etc..must be alot easier than Warren and I:)
     
  5. WarrenG

    WarrenG New Member

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    140 rpm's in the first few seconds off a standing start...? That might be better, but give it a try and I think you'll see that your technique will influence the outcome.
     
  6. Billsworld

    Billsworld New Member

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    I have the best solution for all of this. Train hard! Pick brains of experienced riders. Find way to get bike past 40 mph.:) The pre power meter way. :eek:
     
  7. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    Ok, that helps. My best 5 second readings come from when I do a standing start in my 53x19 and shift. Or when I go into a ~12% 'hill' at around 25mph and nail the hill. Either way, average cadence of those best 5 seconds is usually 110-115rpms out of the saddle. Best single second peaks have usually been on slight downhills, or on a flat imediately after a small downhill - where I'm able to go in my 53x15 from a good speed without having worked much at all before my jump.
     
  8. Billsworld

    Billsworld New Member

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    I would kill to make 2000 watts in a 53x15 @115 rpm.
     
  9. WarrenG

    WarrenG New Member

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    As you say, speed is very important. If you have access to a track, with the ability to time yourself over various distances and do plenty of racing then you can see changes in your total performance better than you can just by looking at your powermeter. But if you must look for changes when you're away from a track...
     
  10. Billsworld

    Billsworld New Member

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    Agreed . This sound nuts, but I accually priced a track for my yard(8 acres)One similar to the Vandedrome ....I would do it too, but I think I am going to subdivide it instead.
     
  11. acoggan

    acoggan Member

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    Anyone who reviews this thread will see that that is what we have been discussing all along.

    Well if you want to focus on the individual, then the answer is easy: if you want to go faster, train yourself to produce more power while reducing your resistance. The latter, of course, is composed of inertia, rolling resistance, and aerodynamic drag, all of which are negatively impacted by excess body mass. Hence, the goal is to increase power/mass, not just power alone. Only if you lose power by losing mass (which is indeed a danger) are you going to go slower.


    I never said otherwise.

    Not opinion: verifiable facts.

    Did I mention that my mother smokes? ;)
     
  12. acoggan

    acoggan Member

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    My bad: what I really meant was "while standing" (versus sitting). The whole optimal cadence/fatigue/gear ratio/inertial load is subsumed under my comments to velomanct that you have to "get on top of the gear" very quickly to produce maximal power.
     
  13. acoggan

    acoggan Member

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    Not "whatever gear you want", because if the gear is too large your muscles will begin to fatigue before you reach optimal cadence. Unless you're very powerful, you have to use a surprisingly small gear to reach max power during a standing start.
     
  14. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    I agree with this statement. I experimented with TT starts and eventually settled on my small ring and a pretty small gear because I could get up to speed so much more quickly, even with gear changes.
     
  15. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    Keep up your training and you might be surprised. I was peaking at 1500 a year ago when I was untrained (was focusing on endurance racing).
     
  16. Billsworld

    Billsworld New Member

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    what I meant was the gear thats best for quick power. Apparently I have been doing it all wrong. I have been mesuring power in situations that reproduce racing. For example a jump from 26 mph or a start in a 52x15 up to full speed. When able to choose a gear thats hits the sweet spot with no fatigue it produces more favorable results for peak watts.
     
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