Stress and cycling

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by jj, Mar 7, 2005.

  1. jj

    jj Guest

    Just got back from a minor surgical procedure at the doctor's office, and
    beforehand I promised myself I'd ride afterwards. I was psyched to do so
    because of the good weather. In addition this was going to be my reward
    when I got the procedure over and done.

    However about 1/2 hour after returning home I felt quite weak and could
    detect a bit of unsteadiness. Very strange, especially since the procedure
    should have had no effect on my cycling whatsoever. I didn't ride - also
    very strange for me, because -nothing- keeps me from riding except
    blizzards, floods and tornado warnings. ;-)

    At first I couldn't figure it out. Then my wife reminded me that prior to
    going in I was experiencing a very high stress level, thinking the
    procedure might not be so minor.

    Just goes to show you how much of an effect just plain mental stress can
    have on your riding.

    It also raises my awe at how pro-bikers can immediately get back on their
    bike and ride after a crash. Though there might not be substantial injury,
    just the mental stress of the event would leave many people unable to
    continue. Though adrenaline can be your friend, too much can be a problem.

    jj
     
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  2. AustinMN

    AustinMN Guest

    jj wrote:
    > It also raises my awe at how pro-bikers can immediately get back on their
    > bike and ride after a crash. Though there might not be substantial injury,
    > just the mental stress of the event would leave many people unable to
    > continue. Though adrenaline can be your friend, too much can be a problem.


    Indeed. When about ten years old, I did an endo. Though nothing was wrong
    with my bike, I chose to walk home. During the walk, a friend pointed out
    that I was bleeding. In the ER (for stitches) I discovered I had a
    green-stick break of my jaw (on both sides). The only explanation I can
    find for not riding back must have been the shock that I didn't realize I
    was in.

    Austin
    --
    I'm pedaling as fast as I durn well please!
    There are no X characters in my address
     
  3. Bill H.

    Bill H. Guest

    AustinMN wrote:

    > Indeed. When about ten years old, I did an endo. Though nothing was

    wrong
    > with my bike, I chose to walk home. During the walk, a friend

    pointed out
    > that I was bleeding. In the ER (for stitches) I discovered I had a
    > green-stick break of my jaw (on both sides). The only explanation I

    can
    > find for not riding back must have been the shock that I didn't

    realize I
    > was in.


    Yeah, I snapped my collar bone on a bike when I was a kid. It was
    strange, since I was out riding with my friend at the time. I crashed
    into a parked car. Then I had no choice but to walk my bike back to my
    house, a couple blocks away. My friend went with me and I even
    remember us laughing on the way back like kids do. I went home, went
    to bed, and went to the hospital the next day.

    Of course, I had a lot of broken bones growing up - ten. I was always
    in the wrong place at the wrong time.

    -Bill H.
     
  4. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    jj wrote:

    > It also raises my awe at how pro-bikers can immediately get back on
    > their bike and ride after a crash. Though there might not be
    > substantial injury, just the mental stress of the event would leave
    > many people unable to continue. Though adrenaline can be your friend,
    > too much can be a problem.


    I think this is what separates pros from the rest of us. Everyone has setbacks.
    Pros carry on regardless.

    Matt O.
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Tue, 8 Mar 2005 14:42:05 -0500, <[email protected]>,
    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >jj wrote:
    >
    >> It also raises my awe at how pro-bikers can immediately get back on
    >> their bike and ride after a crash. Though there might not be
    >> substantial injury, just the mental stress of the event would leave
    >> many people unable to continue. Though adrenaline can be your friend,
    >> too much can be a problem.

    >
    >I think this is what separates pros from the rest of us. Everyone has setbacks.
    >Pros carry on regardless.


    Well, maybe after a few cocktails.

    I've ridden home both times after being smacked by scuds. Once with a
    broken arm on a 3-spd loaner from the bike shop doing the repairs.

    I rode home with a leg injury that left me unable to stand, sit or
    walk for two weeks though I rode almost every day during that
    "recovery" period.

    I don't buy prescription drugs but might use 222 if the pain is
    keeping me awake.
    --
    zk
     
  6. Bill H.

    Bill H. Guest

    Yep. I think when you're forced to rely on yourself, you surprise
    yourself with what you're capable of. I'm thinking about that guy who
    had to cut his arm off with a dull knife to dislodge himself from a
    boulder he was trapped behind. Now THAT would be tough!

    Of course, for pro riders I think there might be a kind of pride and
    machismo that comes into it where you don't want to let someone see
    that you're hurt. Just a thought.

    -Bill H.
     
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    In article <[email protected]>,
    jj <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >It also raises my awe at how pro-bikers can immediately get back on their
    >bike and ride after a crash. Though there might not be substantial injury,
    >just the mental stress of the event would leave many people unable to
    >continue. Though adrenaline can be your friend, too much can be a problem.
    >


    _ I don't know how much you've crashed, but for the most part
    it's fairly easy to get up and ride away. Most crashes happen so
    fast that you don't have time to get really anxious about it. It
    takes a couple hours for the pain to really set in. To me the
    amazing part is riding the next day. I've probably crashed at
    least a dozen times over the years and the part I dread the most
    is taking the shower when you get home and sleeping the first
    night.

    _ I raced for a few years in my youth and for the most part I
    find watching other people crash to leave more mental scars.
    That and the near misses seem to stick more in my memory.
    Crashing is part of the sport and by the time you get to be
    a pro, you've done enough to be blase about it. It's the ones
    they don't ride away from that cause the mental anquish ( i.e.
    Beloki ).

    _ Booker C. Bense

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  8. bbaka

    bbaka Guest

    Booker C. Bense wrote:
    >
    > _ I don't know how much you've crashed, but for the most part
    > it's fairly easy to get up and ride away. Most crashes happen so
    > fast that you don't have time to get really anxious about it. It
    > takes a couple hours for the pain to really set in. To me the
    > amazing part is riding the next day. I've probably crashed at
    > least a dozen times over the years and the part I dread the most
    > is taking the shower when you get home and sleeping the first
    > night.
    >
    > _ I raced for a few years in my youth and for the most part I
    > find watching other people crash to leave more mental scars.
    > That and the near misses seem to stick more in my memory.
    > Crashing is part of the sport and by the time you get to be
    > a pro, you've done enough to be blase about it. It's the ones
    > they don't ride away from that cause the mental anquish ( i.e.
    > Beloki ).
    >
    > _ Booker C. Bense
    >

    Beloki was definitely out with a broken femur and Hamilton could have
    been but showed amazing determination to finish as well as he did.

    And yes, the shower does remind you of how bad you did during the day,
    both crashing a bike and after a really bad sunburn. Been there, done
    that, road rash but no broken bones from a bike crash, sunburn from
    first day on the boat and too much fun to think about sun.

    Live life until you can't. Let the dust gather on the television, not
    the bike.
    Bill Baka
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Bill Baka wrote:

    > ...
    > And yes, the shower does remind you of how bad you did during the day,
    > both crashing a bike and after a really bad sunburn. Been there, done
    > that, road rash but no broken bones from a bike crash, sunburn from
    > first day on the boat and too much fun to think about sun....


    Pepper spray on the skin feels only mildly warm until one gets into the
    shower, then it gets hot.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Earth (Downstate Illinois, North of Forgottonia)
     
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