"Stress Relieving" wheels.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Travers Waker, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. Hi.

    "Stress Relieving" of wheels is often mentioned in this group and often
    described as "squeezing pairs of spokes together".

    Could someone explain to me which two spokes make up a pair to be squeezed?
    Is it one spoke from each hub flange (i.e. on opposite sides of the wheel),
    or a pair of spokes coming from the same hub flange (same side of the
    wheel)?

    Thanks,

    Travers
     
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  2. MikeYankee

    MikeYankee Guest

    Same side of flange. The standard way is to squeezing parallel spokes
    together. You can also put old crankarm (or piece of broomstick) in between
    each pair of spokes, about 1/3 of the way between their crossing point and the
    rim, and use a prying action.





    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers.
    To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
  3. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Travers Waker <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Stress Relieving" of wheels is often mentioned in this group and often
    > described as "squeezing pairs of spokes together".


    > Could someone explain to me which two spokes make up a pair to be squeezed?
    > Is it one spoke from each hub flange (i.e. on opposite sides of the wheel),
    > or a pair of spokes coming from the same hub flange (same side of the
    > wheel)?


    You should be squeezing two pairs at a time, one pair on each side of the
    wheel. Find two near parallel spokes on one side, and another pair (nearly
    adjacent) on the other side. Give both pairs a good solid squeeze.
    Then work your way around the wheel until you've squeezed them all. It's a
    good idea to wear leather gloves to protect your hands.

    Art Harris
     
  4. Travers Waker writes:

    > "Stress Relieving" of wheels is often mentioned in this group and
    > often described as "squeezing pairs of spokes together".


    > Could someone explain to me which two spokes make up a pair to be
    > squeezed? Is it one spoke from each hub flange (i.e. on opposite
    > sides of the wheel), or a pair of spokes coming from the same hub
    > flange (same side of the wheel)?


    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8c.1.html

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  5. Bill Lloyd

    Bill Lloyd Guest

    On 2004-08-12 07:16:28 -0700, "Travers Waker" <[email protected]> said:

    > Hi.
    >
    > "Stress Relieving" of wheels is often mentioned in this group and often
    > described as "squeezing pairs of spokes together".
    >
    > Could someone explain to me which two spokes make up a pair to be squeezed?
    > Is it one spoke from each hub flange (i.e. on opposite sides of the wheel),
    > or a pair of spokes coming from the same hub flange (same side of the
    > wheel)?


    Parallel spokes, on a particular side of the wheel. You'll typicall
    grab a pair in your left hand, and a pair in your right.

    Wear eye protection while doing this. You also need leather gloves,
    because squeezing hard enough to be effective will really hurt your
    hands. You need to squeeze pretty hard to be effective.
     
  6. Bill-<< You also need leather gloves,
    because squeezing hard enough to be effective will really hurt your
    hands. >><BR><BR>

    Nancy....

    ;-lo

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. Bill Lloyd wrote in message ...
    >>

    >Parallel spokes, on a particular side of the wheel. You'll typicall
    >grab a pair in your left hand, and a pair in your right.
    >
    >Wear eye protection while doing this. You also need leather gloves,
    >because squeezing hard enough to be effective will really hurt your
    >hands. You need to squeeze pretty hard to be effective.
    >

    How do you know when it's hard enough? How do you judge effectiveness?
    What effect?

    Trevor
     
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