Stretching the Back/Butt

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by noonievut, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    I just purchased my first road bike (I ususally ride a mountain bike) and after going for a 30 minute ride last night, I have to say that my lower back and upper butt hurt this morning.

    I know that the position is different when compared to mountain biking, so I do expect some uncomfort early on, however, I would like to know what kind of stretching I can do to help the lower back and other areas affected by the new road position.

    Any web sites links or explanations are appreciated.

    P.S. I usually give me legs/arms some good stretching and have found that it works, but I'm never found a good way to work on the back (I usually stetch my quads or other parts by holding for 10, 3 times...).

    Cheers.
     
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  2. roger89

    roger89 New Member

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    Well, sometimes I get some numbness at my lower back..
     
  3. Don Shipp

    Don Shipp New Member

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    There is no reason to suppose that stretching will help at all. Any unnaccustomed excercise will make you ache in an unnaccustomed place.
    Having said that:-
    You should be able to touch your toes. Do not "bounce." Hold for 30 seconds.
     
  4. Aaberg

    Aaberg New Member

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    I had the same experience when I started with a road bike. I did a lot of stretching for the first few months, but I still felt a stiff and not flexible.

    A few weeks ago I stopped streching all together (after reading a few threads on this forum advocating that stretching does is not necessary for cyclists - unless you some kind of a problem), and shortly after I actually felt less stiff in my lower back and my flexibility when riding the road bike had improved. This kind of surprised me.

    I talked to my physiotherapist who told my that it was better that my lower back muscles and buttocks had some tension, and that my streching might have removed the tension and made my muscles relax too much.

    Of course other people might react differently, but it's no more streching for me...

    I'd give a few weeks to get your muscles accustomed to the new position and I bet you're gonna be allright.
     
  5. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    I had the same problem when switching to a road bike. Bought a Specialized Sequoia so that I could keep my upright riding position. Ended up buying an Allez Sport for a decent price to use in my trainer. It has a more forward bent over riding position. I had a heck of a time getting used to it but am now able to spend a fair amount of time in the drops even. Of course, the stem is still angled upward as much as possible.

    It just takes some getting used to. And in some cases, like mine, quite a bit of getting used to.
     
  6. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    The road bike position likely has your hips and glutes more engaged. Believe pushing hard in the big ring can easily overstress these muscles until they get used to the new position. Take it easy on the gearing and keeping the cadence up should help a lot.

    Last summer I started daily stretching and core strength exercises which have given me almost total relief from low back pain on the bike. Not sure whether its the strength or stretching that has done the trick, but I'll keep doing both....no need to mess with success.
     
  7. davidbod

    davidbod New Member

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    If your lower back is giving you problems, for stretching try a piriformis stretch and hamstring stretch (look up piriformis on the web). You should also consider strengthening your core muscles. And as has been stated you may just need time to adjust to the new position.
     
  8. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    Well since buying the bike a few days ago I've put on a 100km and I already feel better about the position. I've found a few good stretches for those muscels that seem to be getting more of a workout then before, so some of the early ache has already left.

    A few things I did notice about technique though:

    - when riding in the drops I notice increased pressure on the boys...and I'm not sure if I'm leaning forward too much...so I tried to really get weight back in the sit bones when in the drops, seems better but not sure if this is normal or not...
    - I find that my quads (just above knee cap, to the inside) feel really 'used' after riding the new bike, I'm thinking that my old mountain bike set-up meant that these muscles weren't used to the same degree...

     
  9. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Yes, keeping your weight back on your sitz bones is the way to go. Depending on your saddle, it may help to tilt it a few degrees back to keep you from sliding forward. Or, a small bit of forward tilt may help take pressure off.

    You might want to try raising the saddle a small amount to take pressure off the quads above the kneecap. Try 1 cm or less and see how that goes. If your hips start rocking as you pedal, the saddle is too high.
     
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