Strong light wheels for 98 kg rider

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by mmamster, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. mmamster

    mmamster New Member

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    I am looking for a recommendation for a pair of light weight and strong roadbike wheels. I currently have shimano 540 wheels that have proved fragile. Specifically have broken spokes under stress – I am 98 kg and snapped spokes when standing on the pedals climbing at speed (about 40 km/h). I was close to going over the handle bars but managed to stay on board . This was in a triathlon TT.

    My research has since shown that these wheels (standard kit on my bike) have a habit of doing this and are pretty much garbage wheels.

    I am looking at mavic’s kysirium elites or SLs. Do you have any other recommendations in a similar price range? I have read bad press about older SLs splitting on the rim but am told this has been fixed in the 2005 model.

    Thanks in anticipation of responses.
     
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  2. gregkeller

    gregkeller New Member

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    I weigh in at around 90 kg, and have ridden the ksyriums (whatever the top of the line ones are, ssl's?), and have never had a problem with them. they are really strong, and just have them checked out every time the bike goes in for a tune up. Think they needed to be trued a little after i first got them cause they settled in, but otherwise they have been bombproof. I think if i was purchasing them seperately i would get something different (i got them as part of a complete bike), i really like the american classic 420's, or the Rolf Vigors, i think they are stiffer, wich is good for big guys.
     
  3. mmamster

    mmamster New Member

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    Thanks - I have not seen Rolf Vigors or AMerican classics in australia - does anyone know of a dealer in melbourne?
     
  4. CatSpin

    CatSpin New Member

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    No answers on the above, mate, but a suggestion below.

    ZIPP404, Clydesdales. Excellent product, great company, very good service world-wide.

    http://www.zipp.com/products/wheels/404-clydesdale.shtml




    CatSpin
     
  5. mikeg

    mikeg New Member

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    Have a look at this thread in aus.bicycle

    http://www.cyclingforums.com/t206578-a-fairer-look-at-the-oz-product.html

    mike
     
  6. sambo76

    sambo76 New Member

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    Are you looking for a training wheel or a race wheel. I own a set of American Classic CR-420's and they are brillant. Though I only weigh 82kg and you may be to heavy for the front wheel when sprinting or standing.

    Zipp 404 and Mavic Ksyrium SSL are great wheels but i dont think they suit being used as a training wheel day in and day out due to there cost should something happen. Eg today I just destroyed a CR-420 front rim whilst going down a flat raod at speed. Missed seeing the enourmous pothole and bent the lip of the rim, double punctured and moved handlebars and levers in different directions. Very lucky to stay upright. That sort of mishap on a 404 or SSL would prove extremely expensive.

    Am now having a set of open pro rims built on a set of 105 hubs I have lying around which will make a very strong set of training wheels and having a new rim built on to my american classics to use as a race wheel only.

    Hope that helps and gives you a little bit more info before you spend $1500+ on wheels that are more suited to racing then everyday riding and training.
     
  7. mmamster

    mmamster New Member

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    I'm looking for wheels to use all the time, not just for racing. The feedback I have got elsewhere is that SLs might be too fragile for everyday use and should be kept as a race wheel. Can't afford both so thinking now of the elites or a few other options - velomax circuits - campagnolo zondas (?? not sure if it is this one or one up on the range). Any comments?

    BTW if you don't know of it already check out www.roadbikereview.com which has a lot of reviews of bike parts by readers.
     
  8. bikeguy2004

    bikeguy2004 New Member

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    I ride on Mavic Ksyrium Equipe wheels (that came with my bike) and so far no problems. I weigh about 106 kg (235 lbs). I like the 24 spokes in the rear wheel and 20 in the front. I’m not sure I’d want a wheel with fewer spokes.

    http://www.mavic.com/servlet/srt/mavic/road-prod_fiche?product.id=48&lg=uk

    These are not the lightest, but they are strong enough for my weight.
     
  9. tafi

    tafi Member

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    I wouldn't use Am Classics any more if I were paid to. Mine were duds and I weigh in at 75kg most of the time. Too flimsy and needed to be trued after every race.
     
  10. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I weigh a kilo or two more than you and I have been on Ksyrium Elites for the past two seasons. I just brought them in for a tune-up after about 10,000 km of use. They aren't super light (replace the skewers that come with them since they are 146 gms a pair) and they do flex a little in hard climbs or sprints, but not too bad. I started with a set of 540's as well and I concur that they are junk (I have broken spokes three times) and too flexible. I did just purchase a pair of Campy Protons and they are stiffer than the Ksyriums and a little lighter. I can't speak to their durability yet, but they feel very strong. I will check back in a few months once I have really put them through some hard miles.
    :cool:
     
  11. mmamster

    mmamster New Member

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    Thanks - I will check out the Protons. Spoke to LBS today who raised some questions about the strength of the Velomax circuits but then again the shop didn't stock them.
     
  12. mjw_byrne

    mjw_byrne New Member

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    I have heard the Campagnolo Eurus and Zonda wheels are very strong, although admittedly Campagnolo caution riders over 80kg to be especially careful with their equipment, which could be interpreted as meaning that Campagnolo reckon their products will struggle with >80kg riders.

    But apparently the wheels are stiff and strong and reliable, so maybe they're what you're looking for. They also have funky reduced spoke patterns (although not as silly as the R540s, which as mentioned are weak) and medium section rims, so would be decent for time trialling/triathlon.
     
  13. geoffs

    geoffs New Member

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    We use Velocity Deep V's with Chris King hubs on our tandem. We were riding in Vic for most of December doing some touring. Our rolling weight when touring is nearly 190kg on 36h wheels.
    You should be fine with 32h and 14/15 spokes. The Velocity rims build a really good lightweight wheel. With your weight (I am about the same) its much better to go for something that will be reliable than to spend double the money on something that may not be. A standard wheel is much easier to repair in the event of a crash also.
    Low spoke count wheels use heavier rims to withstand the forces required with fewer spokes. The best weight to reduce is rotating weight not.
     
  14. p_b_floyd

    p_b_floyd New Member

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    I'd second what geoffs said in favour of Velocity. I weigh 90 kg and flog mine where they really should not go. They take it OK. Maybe ask Velocity (in Brisbane) what they recommend and then check this advice on the aus.bicycle forum - there was a recent thread there speaking well of V.
     
  15. Metz

    Metz New Member

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    I'm 200 lbs. and have the American Classic 420's as well as SSL's. The 420's are great, lighter than the Mavic's and more aero (which I really only notice over 20 mph). Last year I bent the rear rim on my 420's trying to bunnyhop some nasty RR tracks during a century. I loosened the rear brake and actually rode the last 25 miles on the wobbly rim. I contacted Am Classic to arrange for repair and after talking to them decided to upgrade both wheels to bladed spokes, which they recommend for larger riders. They had me just send in the hubs and I pretty much got brand new wheels for $400 (the bladed 420's retail for over $800) since they serviced the hubs as well. Their customer service was informative, helpful, and they didn't try and stick it to me. I would highly recommend Am Classic if you get the bladed spokes.
     
  16. mmamster

    mmamster New Member

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    Have just been to LBS and ordered some Camp. Zonda G3s. Adding those and some tribars should speed things up in the TT! LBS says are strong enough for the weight, feed back on review websites is good too.
     
  17. JTE83

    JTE83 Member

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    Well, I have Ksyrium SSC SL's and I have no choice but to use them for training and racing. My wheels are still true enough after 1000 miles and 3 crashes on my road bike. I have 3 road bikes, but my Cervelo Soloist Team has the SSC SLs. I weigh 163 lbs or 73.94 kg. I crashed at 20.9 mph (33.64 kph) into a curb and my SLs are still true enough to ride without brake rub.

    I would like Ksyrium Elites or Campy Sciroccos for my Giant OCR 1. And I have had no problems with the Shimano R535 wheels on my Giant TCR Aero 2.
     
  18. allezkmiec

    allezkmiec New Member

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    You don't need a factory wheelset; they're built for average riders, and the average roadie doesn't weigh 98 KG. Get some wheels built up with Dura Ace hubs, built 3-cross (32 hole) with nice DT spokes on Mavic Open Pro rims. they'll be almost as light as Ksyrium SLs, with nicer hubs, and more importantly, they'll be stiff and strong, even for a heavier rider. I have a 215-pound friend who races cyclocross on this exact wheelset and he's used those very wheels for 3 seasons with no problems.

    Hope this helps.
    -Matt
     
  19. need11@46

    [email protected] New Member

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    I'm 6'-0" and 220lbs. I have SL's (04) and set them aside because of the stiff ride - a personal preference, to be sure. Also, they are twitchy in a cross-wind. Most of my wheels are custom built using Zipp 95/220 or DT 240s hubs, DT R1.1 rims and Sapim CX-Ray spokes (28/32). I believe all of them weigh less than the Mavic wheels. I like the ride much better, and all have remained true. Price wise, you would save a fair amount if you build with DT Revolution spokes. The Sapim spokes are very costly.

    My opinion is custom-built wheels are a better choice for heavier riders.

    -Wm.
     
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