Stuff sacs?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by David W.E. Roberts, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. Hi,

    anyone know a good cheap source of stuff sacs - those nylon things with a
    draw string top?

    I am finding that spare layers tend to take up too much space when packed
    in and on my small back pack.
    I also carry my waterproof strapped underneath my pack, where it tends to
    get dirty quite quickly.

    Plastic carrier bags aren't suitable because I need to be able to compress
    the clothing then tightly fix the neck of the sack.

    TIA
    Dave R

    --
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    David W.E. Roberts wrote:

    > I am finding that spare layers tend to take up too much space when packed
    > in and on my small back pack.


    A stuffsac doesn't necessarily help /that/ much unless it's compressing
    the item a fair bit. Since the rucksack itself is bag you might as well
    use /it/ and the other contents to do the compression. Another problem
    of stuffsacs is they make all your things into basically cylinders,
    which don't necessarily fill space as well as jackets etc. just stuffed
    into crannies.

    > I also carry my waterproof strapped underneath my pack, where it tends to
    > get dirty quite quickly.


    Stuff it between a fully waterproof liner and the actual rucksack wall.
    That way it will stay clean and won't get anything wet, will be easy
    to locate, and since it'll be basically flat and compressed by the bag's
    other contents it will fill space more effectively than if you put it in
    a wee bag.

    > Plastic carrier bags aren't suitable because I need to be able to compress
    > the clothing then tightly fix the neck of the sack.


    Another approach is just put a webbing strap with a ladderlock buckle
    around them. Stuffsacs only strike me as a major win for highly
    compressible kit like downies and sleeping bags. Otherwise they're as
    much organisational as anything else, and stuff like fleece pullovers
    can generally just be squeezed in at the bottom to compress them
    reasonably effectively anyway. Also, stuffsacs really have to be sized
    for the item in question to optimise the packing volume, as opposed to
    just the organisation side (i.e., "all my toiletries should be in the
    wee orange bag" rather than "they're in this 40 litre bag /somewhere/").

    I find the organisational side is genuinely useful, but it doesn't
    address your problem, particularly.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Geoff Briggs

    Geoff Briggs Guest

    David W.E. Roberts wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > anyone know a good cheap source of stuff sacs - those nylon things with a
    > draw string top?
    >
    > I am finding that spare layers tend to take up too much space when packed
    > in and on my small back pack.
    > I also carry my waterproof strapped underneath my pack, where it tends to
    > get dirty quite quickly.
    >
    > Plastic carrier bags aren't suitable because I need to be able to compress
    > the clothing then tightly fix the neck of the sack.
    >
    > TIA
    > Dave R
    >



    You could always talk to 'stoptous' on ebay. They have an ebay shop

    http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Rambling-and-Walking-Supplies

    and sell realtively cheap stuff sacks.

    Geoff
     
  4. Nigel

    Nigel Guest

    On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 15:56:36 -0000, "David W.E. Roberts"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >anyone know a good cheap source of stuff sacs - those nylon things with a
    >draw string top?
    >
    >I am finding that spare layers tend to take up too much space when packed
    >in and on my small back pack.
    >I also carry my waterproof strapped underneath my pack, where it tends to
    >get dirty quite quickly.
    >
    >Plastic carrier bags aren't suitable because I need to be able to compress
    >the clothing then tightly fix the neck of the sack.
    >
    >TIA
    >Dave R



    I've just purchased a 30 litre Arktis waterproof stuff sack on Ebay,
    cost me 6 squids + postage of £1.20. So far I've found it extremely
    useful.

    There are smaller 'ditty-bag' type stuff-sacks available, made from a
    netting type nylon material, definately not waterproof, but very
    useful for stowing those smaller pieces of clothing and equipment one
    might carry into a compact rucksack.

    Look around some of the camping and outdoor suppliers or on Ebay,
    you'll be surprised at what is available these days. We're spoilt for
    choice.

    Its really all a matter of what you want to carry, how best to pack it
    into the rucksack of your choice and working out the best fit
    possible. Certainly if you wanted to stow your watreproof jacket in a
    stuffsack, then this could be accommodated outside a small daypack or
    rucksack, by the use of quick release stowage straps.

    Nigel
     
  5. "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > David W.E. Roberts wrote:
    >
    > > I am finding that spare layers tend to take up too much space when

    packed
    > > in and on my small back pack.

    >
    > A stuffsac doesn't necessarily help /that/ much unless it's compressing
    > the item a fair bit. Since the rucksack itself is bag you might as well
    > use /it/ and the other contents to do the compression. Another problem
    > of stuffsacs is they make all your things into basically cylinders,
    > which don't necessarily fill space as well as jackets etc. just stuffed
    > into crannies.
    >
    > > I also carry my waterproof strapped underneath my pack, where it tends

    to
    > > get dirty quite quickly.

    >
    > Stuff it between a fully waterproof liner and the actual rucksack wall.
    > That way it will stay clean and won't get anything wet, will be easy
    > to locate, and since it'll be basically flat and compressed by the bag's
    > other contents it will fill space more effectively than if you put it in
    > a wee bag.

    <snip>

    As Nigel said:

    " Certainly if you wanted to stow your watreproof jacket in a
    stuffsack, then this could be accommodated outside a small daypack or
    rucksack, by the use of quick release stowage straps."

    My view is similar i.e. if you want to carry your waterproof outside a small
    daypack by the use of quick release stowage straps (as I do) then you could
    stow it in a stuffsack (which would help to keep it clean).

    I use the daypack as an all purpose item, including carrying shopping when I
    walk to/past the shops.
    I find that carrying the waterproof outside is the most effective
    solution. - it is always available and you don't have to worry about
    unpacking/repacking to keep it at the top of your rucksack when you are
    shopping.

    Similarly I think that it would be easier to reorganise the pack if my
    Polartec 100 hoody (ALS) was in a stuffsack instead of floating free.
    Different requirements than for a day walking in the hills :)

    My TNF Redpoint jacket folds up into its own pocket, so no problem there.

    Cheers

    Dave R
     
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