Subway diet report

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Donal Fagan, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    I started my new Subway diet. 12" chicken salad
    w/ provolone lettuce, tomato and pickles on whole wheat. Also three M&M cookies and a large
    lime-flavored iced tea.

    We'll see how it goes.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
    Tags:


  2. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    "Donal Fagan" <[email protected]'Fagan.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I started my new Subway diet. 12" chicken salad
    > w/ provolone lettuce, tomato and pickles on whole wheat. Also three M&M cookies and a large
    > lime-flavored iced tea.
    >
    > We'll see how it goes.
    >
    >
    > Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)

    That sounds like 5000 calories in one sitting!! 8-o
     
  3. In the United States, the number of cases of cancer is expected to double by the year 2050
    (Sullivan,KM, Duke University in Hem/Onc Today, Aug. 2003). Currently, 90,000 cancer deaths per year
    are attributed to the combination of overweight and obesity, independent of other causes (Callee, EE
    et al New Engl J Med 348:1623,2003). Won't go into heart disease, stroke, diabetes, etc.

    I used to get upset when I saw people smoking and overeating. Then I got smart.

    Now I just think: "Ahh, ....new business."

    Just like Garrison Keillor, I've decided to become a nouveau Republican.

    Larry Weisenthal

    Certitude is poison; curiosity is life
     
  4. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 22:23:41 GMT, Donal Fagan <[email protected]'Fagan.com> wrote:

    >I started my new Subway diet. 12" chicken salad
    >w/ provolone lettuce, tomato and pickles on whole wheat. Also three M&M cookies and a large
    > lime-flavored iced tea.
    >
    >We'll see how it goes.
    >
    >
    >Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)

    I figure that's around 2000 calories. You should do fine if you just work in 4000-5000 yd
    swim everyday. You'll even have room for a breakfast and dinner.

    ~Matt
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Donal Fagan <[email protected]'Fagan.com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I started my new Subway diet. 12" chicken salad
    > w/ provolone lettuce, tomato and pickles on whole wheat. Also three M&M cookies and a large
    > lime-flavored iced tea.
    >
    > We'll see how it goes.

    The Subways in Japan have 12" on the menu, but nobody ever orders them--it would be considered
    glutonous. They had a 4" version for a while, and the lunch boxes come with two 3" sandwiches. It's
    truly a shock to return to the U.S. and see the serving sizes in restaurants.

    Japanese love to feel self-righteously superior in the area of diet, and the latest fad among
    television shows is to profile some hideously obese American. They showed a guy who can't leave his
    house because he's bigger than the doorway. He lives in a hospital bed in the living room, and has
    remote controls for everything. There was another show that profiled a mother and two daughers, all
    of whom were over 500 pounds. They need special industrial scales to weigh themselves.

    There are also shows profiling crime and poverty and riots and what not. It gets really annoying ...
    but I think they have a point about the U.S. diet.

    Recently the North Korean developments have resulting in a lot of shows analyzing North Korean
    television, which can be intercepted and recorded in Japan. The Japanese are shocked at the bizarre
    propaganda about the rest of the world that is shown on North Korean television, but there is a
    certain similarity to some ot the stuff shown about the U.S. on Japanese TV.
     
  6. Donal Fagan wrote:
    >
    > I started my new Subway diet. 12" chicken salad
    > w/ provolone lettuce, tomato and pickles on whole wheat. Also three M&M cookies and a large
    > lime-flavored iced tea.

    To Atkins-ize this, I think all you have to do is throw away the bun. And the cookies, of course. Do
    they even sell M&M cookies at Subway?

    martin

    --
    Martin Smith email: [email protected] Vollsveien 9 tel. : +47 6783 1188
    P.O. Box 482 mob. : +47 932 48 303 1327 Lysaker, Norway
     
  7. Mike Edey

    Mike Edey Guest

    Well you have to admit that, if nothing else, it's a tasty way to die....

    --Mike

    Larry Weisenthal wrote:
    > In the United States, the number of cases of cancer is expected to double by the year 2050
    > (Sullivan,KM, Duke University in Hem/Onc Today, Aug. 2003). Currently, 90,000 cancer deaths
    > per year are attributed to the combination of overweight and obesity, independent of other
    > causes (Callee, EE et al New Engl J Med 348:1623,2003). Won't go into heart disease, stroke,
    > diabetes, etc.
    >
    > I used to get upset when I saw people smoking and overeating. Then I got smart.
    >
    > Now I just think: "Ahh, ....new business."
    >
    > Just like Garrison Keillor, I've decided to become a nouveau Republican.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Larry Weisenthal
    >
    > Certitude is poison; curiosity is life
     
  8. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 20:38:20 GMT, MJuric wrote:

    >I figure that's around 2000 calories. You should do fine if you just work in 4000-5000 yd swim
    >everyday. You'll even have room for a breakfast and dinner.

    Pretty close: 900 = 2x450 six-inch chicken salad 480 = 3x160 cookie 360 = 4x90 lime tea 1740 total

    Sorry Jared, I fell off the Subway wagon today.

    Breakfast was grapes. Not sour, just seedless.

    Our tomatoes were ripe, so I had tomato sandwiches on pumpernickel, a small bag of carrots, chunky
    applesauce and zucchini cake. And more lime tea.

    Dinner was tilapia fish, butter noodles and corn on the cob. And a dark chocolate Klondike.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  9. Dory

    Dory Guest

    Julia Child is still alive at 101 years of age and you know what she ate every day. No porridge for
    her ever. Her Motto is "everything in moderation." Plus it has to taste good. I don't think she ate
    hogies from Subway however. She had more sensitive taste buds than you seem to have. Do you really
    think that stuff from Subway tastes good? Yuck.

    Mike Edey <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Well you have to admit that, if nothing else, it's a tasty way to die....
    >
    > --Mike
    >
    > Larry Weisenthal wrote:
    > > In the United States, the number of cases of cancer is expected to double by the year 2050
    > > (Sullivan,KM, Duke University in Hem/Onc Today, Aug. 2003). Currently, 90,000 cancer deaths
    > > per year are attributed to the combination of overweight and obesity, independent of other
    > > causes (Callee, EE et al New Engl J Med 348:1623,2003). Won't go into heart disease, stroke,
    > > diabetes, etc.
    > >
    > > I used to get upset when I saw people smoking and overeating. Then I got smart.
    > >
    > > Now I just think: "Ahh, ....new business."
    > >
    > > Just like Garrison Keillor, I've decided to become a nouveau Republican.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Larry Weisenthal
    > >
    > > Certitude is poison; curiosity is life
     
  10. Dakitty

    Dakitty Guest

    I like their tuna sandwiches, but I get a 4" round, not a foot-long. No chips or cookies, no cheese,
    no mayo...

    "Dory" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Julia Child is still alive at 101 years of age and you know what she ate every day. No porridge
    > for her ever. Her Motto is "everything in moderation." Plus it has to taste good. I don't think
    > she ate hogies from Subway however. She had more sensitive taste buds than you seem to have. Do
    > you really think that stuff from Subway tastes good? Yuck.
    >
    > Mike Edey <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Well you have to admit that, if nothing else, it's a tasty way to
    die....
    > >
    > > --Mike
    > >
    > > Larry Weisenthal wrote:
    > > > In the United States, the number of cases of cancer is expected to
    double by
    > > > the year 2050 (Sullivan,KM, Duke University in Hem/Onc Today, Aug.
    2003).
    > > > Currently, 90,000 cancer deaths per year are attributed to the
    combination of
    > > > overweight and obesity, independent of other causes (Callee, EE et al
    New Engl
    > > > J Med 348:1623,2003). Won't go into heart disease, stroke, diabetes,
    etc.
    > > >
    > > > I used to get upset when I saw people smoking and overeating. Then I
    got
    > > > smart.
    > > >
    > > > Now I just think: "Ahh, ....new business."
    > > >
    > > > Just like Garrison Keillor, I've decided to become a nouveau
    Republican.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Larry Weisenthal
    > > >
    > > > Certitude is poison; curiosity is life
     
  11. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On 15 Aug 2003 16:00:47 -0700, [email protected] (Dory) wrote:

    >Do you really think that stuff from Subway tastes good?

    I wouldn't put one up against the Iron Chefs, but yes, Subway's subs (hoagies, grinders, torpedoes,
    whatever) are pretty good compared to a lot of fast food. Their main problem seems to be getting
    decent lettuce and tomato. A lot of store-bought tomato is tasteless.

    Around here, Sheetz convenience stores make a pretty good sub, too. I used to bring my stepdaughter
    for a Sheetz tuna sandwich after every swim team practice.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  12. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    If people spent the same amount of energy on anything else that they spend on evaluating what other
    people eat, imagine the problems that could be solved.

    Some small people have high metabolisms and eat a lot. Some large people eat very little. When you
    see someone eating, you don't know what they had for their last meal, or what they have been eating
    for the rest of their lives..

    Also, a smaller BMI is considered obese for Asian people, so it is a good thing that the Japanese
    are not eating 12" subs.

    Chris wrote:

    > Donal Fagan <[email protected]'Fagan.com> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I started my new Subway diet. 12" chicken salad
    > > w/ provolone lettuce, tomato and pickles on whole wheat. Also three M&M cookies and a large
    > > lime-flavored iced tea.
    > >
    > > We'll see how it goes.
    >
    > The Subways in Japan have 12" on the menu, but nobody ever orders them--it would be considered
    > glutonous. They had a 4" version for a while, and the lunch boxes come with two 3" sandwiches.
    > It's truly a shock to return to the U.S. and see the serving sizes in restaurants.
    >
    > Japanese love to feel self-righteously superior in the area of diet, and the latest fad among
    > television shows is to profile some hideously obese American. They showed a guy who can't leave
    > his house because he's bigger than the doorway. He lives in a hospital bed in the living room, and
    > has remote controls for everything. There was another show that profiled a mother and two
    > daughers, all of whom were over 500 pounds. They need special industrial scales to weigh
    > themselves.
    >
    > There are also shows profiling crime and poverty and riots and what not. It gets really annoying
    > ... but I think they have a point about the U.S. diet.
    >
    > Recently the North Korean developments have resulting in a lot of shows analyzing North Korean
    > television, which can be intercepted and recorded in Japan. The Japanese are shocked at the
    > bizarre propaganda about the rest of the world that is shown on North Korean television, but there
    > is a certain similarity to some ot the stuff shown about the U.S. on Japanese TV.
     
  13. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 09:42:23 +0200, "Martin W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Do they even sell M&M cookies at Subway?

    All the ones I've been to sell a variety of large homemade-style cookies.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  14. Dory

    Dory Guest

    I was really surprised when I watched the Walt Disney/Japanese movie "Spirited Away" to see that the
    American parents of the little girl were greedy, very fat people. That seems to be the role most
    Americans have accepted for themselves today. Gluttony is not a word Americans understand. I don't
    even think it is in the standard vocabulary.
    >
    > The Subways in Japan have 12" on the menu, but nobody ever orders them--it would be considered
    > glutonous. They had a 4" version for a while, and the lunch boxes come with two 3" sandwiches.
    > It's truly a shock to return to the U.S. and see the serving sizes in restaurants.
    >
    > Japanese love to feel self-righteously superior in the area of diet, and the latest fad among
    > television shows is to profile some hideously obese American. They showed a guy who can't leave
    > his house because he's bigger than the doorway. He lives in a hospital bed in the living room, and
    > has remote controls for everything. There was another show that profiled a mother and two
    > daughers, all of whom were over 500 pounds. They need special industrial scales to weigh
    > themselves.
    >
    > There are also shows profiling crime and poverty and riots and what not. It gets really annoying
    > ... but I think they have a point about the U.S. diet.
    >
    > Recently the North Korean developments have resulting in a lot of shows analyzing North Korean
    > television, which can be intercepted and recorded in Japan. The Japanese are shocked at the
    > bizarre propaganda about the rest of the world that is shown on North Korean television, but there
    > is a certain similarity to some ot the stuff shown about the U.S. on Japanese TV.
     
  15. Chris <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Japanese love to feel self-righteously superior in the area of diet, and the latest fad among
    >television shows is to profile some hideously obese American. They showed a guy who can't leave his
    >house because he's bigger than the doorway.

    And yet they glorify their sumo wrestlers above all else. There may be a good amount of muscle and
    power underneath all that blubber, but it certainly is a bit at odds with this.

    As for the ribbing, eh, we can handle it. We poke as much fun of everyone else.
    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
  16. Donal Fagan wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 18 Aug 2003 09:42:23 +0200, "Martin W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Do they even sell M&M cookies at Subway?
    >
    > All the ones I've been to sell a variety of large homemade-style cookies.

    How do they integrate that into their turkey-sandwitch-diet marketing campaign?

    martin

    --
    Martin Smith email: [email protected] Vollsveien 9 tel. : +47 6783 1188
    P.O. Box 482 mob. : +47 932 48 303 1327 Lysaker, Norway
     
  17. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 08:40:19 +0200, "Martin W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How do they integrate that into their turkey-sandwitch-diet marketing campaign?

    Other than a few sandwiches, they offer many items that aren't low-anything, like potato chips,
    meatball subs, etc.

    >>>>
    Subway's 7 sandwiches with 6 grams of fat or less have a calorie range of 230-370 and have as little
    as 3 grams of fat. Choosing one of these subs can save 140-340 calories and at least 24 grams of fat
    in just one meal.

    *Individuals lost weight by exercising and eating a balanced, reduced-calorie diet that included
    SUBWAY® sandwiches with 6 grams of fat or less. Their results are not typical. Your loss if any will
    vary. SUBWAY® Restaurants' does not endorse the diet Jared created and cautions anyone embarking on
    a weight-loss plan to consult their physician. Vegetable servings based on guidelines set forth by
    The National Cancer Institute.
    >>>>

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  18. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On 17 Aug 2003 18:17:50 -0700, [email protected] (Chris) wrote:

    >Japanese love to feel self-righteously superior in the area of diet, and the latest fad among
    >television shows is to profile some hideously obese American.

    Like, Akebono?

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  19. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On 21 Aug 2003 01:32:22 GMT, [email protected] (Larry Weisenthal) wrote:

    >And sometimes feelings of self-righteous superiority are richly deserved.

    Doesn't sound too healthy. "Pride goeth," etc.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  20. Donal Fagan <[email protected]'Fagan.com> wrote:
    >(Larry Weisenthal) wrote:
    >>And sometimes feelings of self-righteous superiority are richly deserved.
    >
    >Doesn't sound too healthy. "Pride goeth," etc.

    More like "people who live in glass houses..."

    Japanese culture has more than its share of deficiencies to be making too much fun of fat Yankees.

    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
Loading...
Loading...