Sudanese Sticking to Low-Carb Diets

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Joe the Aroma, Jan 27, 2006.

  1. The low-carb diet trend may have peaked in the United States, but don't try
    telling residents of southern Sudan that it was just a fad.

    "Almost everyone I know is eating low-carb," says Ken Ndongwe, a resident of
    the Happy Hills Refugee Camp near the border with Chad.

    In many other parts of the world the low carb diet remains extremely
    popular. North Korea and Afghanistan have long heeded the call to the diet's
    allure and experts claim that it was popular in Bangladesh for years before
    it became a phenomenon in the United States.

    "There's this perception that Atkin's and South Beach and the like are
    ritzy, flashy, celebrity-driven crazes of interest only to those in wealthy
    countries. Not so - people are concerned about their weight everywhere,"
    says nutrition expert Marietta Galdes.

    "It's not just diet - exercise is important too," admits Sarona Obe Makemba,
    another resident of Happy Hills. "For example, I walk eight miles every
    morning to get water and search for firewood."

    The slender 34-year-old has almost achieved her target weight of 93 pounds
    after a food-relief-related binge sent her ballooning towards 97 pounds.

    Celebrities Flock to Sudanese Resorts

    Amid signs that 'starvation is the new black', stars have rushed to
    Fashionable Economic Zones to pick up the latest eating-disorder crazes.

    Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have been sighted in at least two third-world
    countries since last week, ostensibly browsing for adoption possibilities.
    In a scary near miss on Tuesday, the couple narrowly averted bumping into
    Pitt's ex-wife Jennifer Aniston, who has spent weeks eating long grass in
    fields in the Sudan.

    "It's so difficult being rich and misunderstood," Aniston told reporters. "I
    was in a clinic for three weeks after I ate a twinky last June, but my
    therapists tell me I've made a lot of progress since then."

    Speaking candidly to Brainsnap, the actress announced that she was "totally
    over Brad and wishes only the best for whatsername." She added that she felt
    a new optimism toward her future. "At first I'm like oh-mi-god but now I'm
    like ok-aaay. What I had with Brad was so like special but I fully expect
    that that was the first of many such marriages."

    Ms Aniston is staying in Khartoum at an exclusive resort where celebrities
    can experience the complex pleasures of third-world guilt while still
    enjoying the comforts of five-star living. According to her publicity agent
    the actress is also working on an autobiography about her years with her
    former husband, tentatively entitled, "African Poverty, and How It Relates
    To The Break-Up of My Marriage."



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  2. The low-carb diet trend may have peaked in the United States, but don't try
    telling residents of southern Sudan that it was just a fad.

    "Almost everyone I know is eating low-carb," says Ken Ndongwe, a resident of
    the Happy Hills Refugee Camp near the border with Chad.

    In many other parts of the world the low carb diet remains extremely
    popular. North Korea and Afghanistan have long heeded the call to the diet's
    allure and experts claim that it was popular in Bangladesh for years before
    it became a phenomenon in the United States.

    "There's this perception that Atkin's and South Beach and the like are
    ritzy, flashy, celebrity-driven crazes of interest only to those in wealthy
    countries. Not so - people are concerned about their weight everywhere,"
    says nutrition expert Marietta Galdes.

    "It's not just diet - exercise is important too," admits Sarona Obe Makemba,
    another resident of Happy Hills. "For example, I walk eight miles every
    morning to get water and search for firewood."

    The slender 34-year-old has almost achieved her target weight of 93 pounds
    after a food-relief-related binge sent her ballooning towards 97 pounds.

    Celebrities Flock to Sudanese Resorts

    Amid signs that 'starvation is the new black', stars have rushed to
    Fashionable Economic Zones to pick up the latest eating-disorder crazes.

    Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have been sighted in at least two third-world
    countries since last week, ostensibly browsing for adoption possibilities.
    In a scary near miss on Tuesday, the couple narrowly averted bumping into
    Pitt's ex-wife Jennifer Aniston, who has spent weeks eating long grass in
    fields in the Sudan.

    "It's so difficult being rich and misunderstood," Aniston told reporters. "I
    was in a clinic for three weeks after I ate a twinky last June, but my
    therapists tell me I've made a lot of progress since then."

    Speaking candidly to Brainsnap, the actress announced that she was "totally
    over Brad and wishes only the best for whatsername." She added that she felt
    a new optimism toward her future. "At first I'm like oh-mi-god but now I'm
    like ok-aaay. What I had with Brad was so like special but I fully expect
    that that was the first of many such marriages."

    Ms Aniston is staying in Khartoum at an exclusive resort where celebrities
    can experience the complex pleasures of third-world guilt while still
    enjoying the comforts of five-star living. According to her publicity agent
    the actress is also working on an autobiography about her years with her
    former husband, tentatively entitled, "African Poverty, and How It Relates
    To The Break-Up of My Marriage."



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