Suggestions please - looking for a trainer bike (e.g. cheap) 1 1/8" threadless fork



C

Callas

Guest
...and I can't find one!

Anyone suggest a cheap, sturdy, heavy 1 and 1/8 inch
threadless fork?

I can see budget 1 inch forks for about 30 quid.

--
Callas
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Callas wrote:
> ...and I can't find one!
>
> Anyone suggest a cheap, sturdy, heavy 1 and 1/8 inch
> threadless fork?
>
> I can see budget 1 inch forks for about 30 quid.

If a 178mm steerer is long enough -
http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm - Clearance forks

~PB
 
C

Callas

Guest
pclemantine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc wrote:
> Callas wrote:
> > ...and I can't find one!
> >
> > Anyone suggest a cheap, sturdy, heavy 1 and 1/8 inch
> > threadless fork?
> >
> > I can see budget 1 inch forks for about 30 quid.
>
> If a 178mm steerer is long enough -
> http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm -
> Clearance forks

Bugger - didn't think about steerer length. I've no idea
what I need. I have a 3cm stack. Will have to ask bike
mechanic friend.

--
Callas
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Callas wrote:
> pclemantine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc wrote:
>> Callas wrote:
>>> ...and I can't find one!
>>>
>>> Anyone suggest a cheap, sturdy, heavy 1 and 1/8 inch
>>> threadless fork?
>>>
>>> I can see budget 1 inch forks for about 30 quid.
>>
>> If a 178mm steerer is long enough -
>> http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm -
>> Clearance forks
>
> Bugger - didn't think about steerer length. I've no idea
> what I need. I have a 3cm stack. Will have to ask bike
> mechanic friend.

What size frame is it? Or more specifically, how long is its
head tube? That would give a rough idea. Don't worry about
buying exactly the right length. With threadless, you
normally buy one longer than needed then cut to size. Uncut
forks tend to be 300mm - long enough for most large frames.
"Sale" forks might be shorter if they've been fitted to a
bike or are OEM.

~PB
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
I wrote:
> What size frame is it? Or more specifically, how long is
> its head tube? That would give a rough idea. Don't worry
> about buying exactly the right length. With threadless,
> you normally buy one longer than needed then cut to size.

...and/or fit spacers above stem.

~PB
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On 17/4/04 9:27 pm, in article [email protected],
"Pete Biggs" <pclemantine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

> I wrote:
>> What size frame is it? Or more specifically, how long is
>> its head tube? That would give a rough idea. Don't worry
>> about buying exactly the right length. With threadless,
>> you normally buy one longer than needed then cut to size.
>

I am considering what to do with my current road bike. The
headset has cracked (stronglight A9) but is still rideable,
albeit with a bit of a buzz.

I have a few options as I'd like to change the stem to give
a better bar position (could do with the bar being a bit
higher and further forward..)

1. replace the headset with the same. Replace the quill stem
with a longer quill stem.

2. as 1. but put a quill to threadless stem adapter in and
look for nice stems.

3. replace the forks and headset with threadless and get
a new stem.

the bike is a Ribble 653 from 1990/1991. The front
fork is 531c IIRC. brakes are shimano rx100 (fitted to
sante levers.)

what would I notice on changing the forks?

The main reason for changing the stem is that it is too
short and too low. The frame is really a bit too small for
me and too short a top tube.

thoughts?

..d
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
David Martin wrote:
> I am considering what to do with my current road bike. The
> headset has cracked (stronglight A9) but is still
> rideable, albeit with a bit of a buzz.
>
> I have a few options as I'd like to change the stem to
> give a better bar position (could do with the bar being a
> bit higher and further forward..)
>
> 1. replace the headset with the same. Replace the quill
> stem with a longer quill stem.
>
> 2. as 1. but put a quill to threadless stem adapter in and
> look for nice stems.

Adapters work well and do increase choice of stems a lot.

> 3. replace the forks and headset with threadless and get a
> new stem.
>
> the bike is a Ribble 653 from 1990/1991. The front fork is
> 531c IIRC. brakes are shimano rx100 (fitted to sante
> levers.)
>
> what would I notice on changing the forks?

If carbon: weight saving + better damping. If components are
carefully selected, geometry and riding position can be the
same with either type of forks and either type of stem. A
small amount of aditional weight could possibly be saved
with an aheadset and stem as well.

I think it comes down to the forks. Regardless of the stem &
headset business, do you fancy new forks anyway? If not, I
suggest getting a new threaded headset (or parts to fix A9)
and either a new quill stem (if prefer and can find one with
a shaft long enough) or quill adapter and ahead stem with a
bit of rise. If would like new forks, might as well get a
full threadless system - better choice of good forks now,
for a start.

> The main reason for changing the stem is that it is too
> short and too low. The frame is really a bit too small for
> me and too short a top tube.

Be careful if considering all-carbon forks (ie. with carbon
steerer tube). There's a small limit to how many spacers can
be placed above the headset. Alumnium or steel steerer is
better suited when putting bars up higher.

~PB
 
C

Callas

Guest
pclemantine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc wrote:
> Callas wrote:
> > ...and I can't find one!
> >
> > Anyone suggest a cheap, sturdy, heavy 1 and 1/8 inch
> > threadless fork?
> >
> > I can see budget 1 inch forks for about 30 quid.
>
> If a 178mm steerer is long enough -
> http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm -
> Clearance forks

I think I need the full 300mm - just checked the head tube.
I don't have a measure here, but it's a 60cm frame and by
eye I think I'm well over 17.8cm.

Still - glad I'm aware of the issue now! :)

They sell I think some 40 quid forks which should do, so
thanks Pete :)

--
Callas