Suit Protection

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Mjuric, Sep 13, 2003.

  1. Mjuric

    Mjuric Guest

    Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on every
    couple of months. While were on the subject is there any method for convincing a place to lower the
    chlorine content in a pool? Seems my regular is extremely high compared to others I've been in.

    ~Matt
     
    Tags:


  2. MJuric <[email protected]> wrote:
    > While were on the subject is there any method for convincing a place to lower the chlorine
    > content in a pool? Seems my regular is extremely high compared to others I've been in.

    It may be beyond their purview. I believe, for San Francisco, the high chlorination is driven by
    city regulations, perhaps dating back to early HIV scares. It burns quite something - was no fun
    doing divemaster drills without masks.

    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
  3. Ross Bogue

    Ross Bogue Guest

    In <[email protected]> MJuric wrote:
    >
    > Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru
    > on every couple of months.

    Lycra, nylon, or poly?

    The lycra (typically 20% lycra + 80% nylon) suits are very comfortable, but only last a few
    months of heavy use. Many of us use all nylon or all poly suits for workouts and save the lycra
    suits for racing.

    Some people manage to extend the life of a lycra suit by careful washing and avoiding soaps. I
    haven't had much luck that way myself, though.

    Ross
     
  4. Peabody

    Peabody Guest

    MJuric says...

    >Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on every
    >couple of months.

    For the last four years I've used a chlorine/bromine neutralizer on my lycra suits, and they last a
    long time. The last one I threw away was after more than a year, and it was because the liner
    started to disintegrate, not the body of the suit.

    And I guess I should say that this is in a bromine pool, not chlorine. I don't know if it makes any
    difference.

    I don't know about the cleaners, and I seriously doubt you really need anything more than the
    neutralizer. I use sodium thiosulfate, which I get at my local chemical supply house for about $8 a
    pound, which lasts many months.

    After swimming, I rinse the suit out in the shower. Then when I get home I soak the suit in a quart
    of water with 1/4 teaspoon of the thiosulfate dissolved (this is for a male suit - female would
    probably need more). Then after an hour or so I rinse that out thoroughly with tap water, press-dry
    the suit in a towel, and hang it up to dry.

    The thiosulfate changes the chlorine compounds, which have attached to your suit, into soluble
    compounds that just rinse away, so they don't just continue to eat away at the lycra between swims.
    If you can smell the chlorine, you can be sure it's still working away at your suit.

    The problem with this is that it takes a little time, and you have to do it every time you swim. You
    can't just do it once a week. Personally, I really hate that chlorine smell, so I really don't mind
    the little extra time it takes to get rid of it. But, you know, suits don't cost all that much, so
    it may just be better to replace them as needed, and not bother with the chemicals.
     
  5. 4precious

    4precious Guest

    [email protected] (MJuric) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on
    > every couple of months. While were on the subject is there any method for convincing a place to
    > lower the chlorine content in a pool? Seems my regular is extremely high compared to others I've
    > been in.
    >
    > ~Matt

    I'm a relative novice swimmer, so it's taken me a little time to figure out the suit thing. But
    my punchline is: wear lycra suits. Replace when they become worn out and relatively see-through
    (you will know this is the case when the coach on deck no longer EVER comes by your lane due to
    the view :)

    Tried nylon. Lasts a bit longer although the color fades. However, the non-stretchable fabric is
    such a pain compared to the elastic lycra.

    I'm going to buy three or four lycra speedo suits whenever the yearly sales occur at the local
    swim shops.

    -Eric
     
  6. Ross Bogue

    Ross Bogue Guest

    In <[email protected]> MJuric wrote:
    >
    > The suits that blow out in a couple of months are the
    > Lycra/nylon blend. How much longer do the all nylon typically last?

    I've been using a Keifer nylon suit for almost a year. It's starting to fade a bit, but still seems
    quite sturdy.

    Ross
     
  7. Stuz

    Stuz Guest

    As we in the Europe and the Antipodes keep reminding you in the Americas, you can get the Speedo
    (and other makers) Endurance ranges here. They fit like a normal costume but they are
    INDISTRUCTABLE!! Try http://www.allensswimwear.co.uk/ even with the minimal postage its a lot
    cheaper than the US.

    They even do fuller coverage Briefs to suit the more conservative Stateside tastes.

    Stuz

    "MJuric" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on
    > every couple of months. While were on the subject is there any method for convincing a place to
    > lower the chlorine content in a pool? Seems my regular is extremely high compared to others I've
    > been in.
    >
    > ~Matt
     
  8. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    Stuz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > As we in the Europe and the Antipodes keep reminding you in the Americas, you can get the Speedo
    > (and other makers) Endurance ranges here. They fit like a normal costume but they are
    > INDISTRUCTABLE!!

    My first few pairs were indestructable, but I managed to lose two of them 8-(.

    My last two pairs seem to be different in that the surface of the cloth has pulled, my latest pair
    after one use. My older pairs after several years are still fine used regularly in the same pool,
    although the bright colours are now starting to fade.

    It was rumoured in my club that one's children would inherit them before they wore out, but I think
    Speedo became aware of this and changed the formulation. They're probably still a good buy, though.

    [snip]
    > > Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on
    > > every couple of months. While were on the subject is there any method for convincing a place to
    > > lower the chlorine content in a pool? Seems my regular is extremely high compared to others I've
    > > been in.
    > >
    I always put mine for a rinse in the washing machine (no washing powder used) and dry them. My main
    pool doesn't use much chlorine (ozone main disinfectant), but I swim regularly in others that do.
    --
    BD
     
  9. Mjuric

    Mjuric Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 22:31:40 +0000 (UTC), Ross Bogue <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In <[email protected]> MJuric wrote:
    >>
    >> Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru
    >> on every couple of months.
    >
    >
    >Lycra, nylon, or poly?
    >
    >The lycra (typically 20% lycra + 80% nylon) suits are very comfortable, but only last a few
    >months of heavy use. Many of us use all nylon or all poly suits for workouts and save the lycra
    >suits for racing.

    The suits that blow out in a couple of months are the
    Lycra/nylon blend. How much longer do the all nylon typically last?

    >
    >Some people manage to extend the life of a lycra suit by careful washing and avoiding soaps. I
    >haven't had much luck that way myself, though.
    >
    >
    >
    >Ross
     
  10. Mjuric

    Mjuric Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 23:00:12 GMT, Peabody <[email protected]> wrote:

    >MJuric says...
    >
    >>Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on
    >>every couple of months.
    >
    >For the last four years I've used a chlorine/bromine neutralizer on my lycra suits, and they last a
    >long time. The last one I threw away was after more than a year, and it was because the liner
    >started to disintegrate, not the body of the suit.
    >
    >And I guess I should say that this is in a bromine pool, not chlorine. I don't know if it makes any
    >difference.
    >
    >I don't know about the cleaners, and I seriously doubt you really need anything more than the
    >neutralizer. I use sodium thiosulfate, which I get at my local chemical supply house for about $8 a
    >pound, which lasts many months.
    >
    >After swimming, I rinse the suit out in the shower. Then when I get home I soak the suit in a quart
    >of water with 1/4 teaspoon of the thiosulfate dissolved (this is for a male suit - female would
    >probably need more). Then after an hour or so I rinse that out thoroughly with tap water, press-dry
    >the suit in a towel, and hang it up to dry.
    >
    >The thiosulfate changes the chlorine compounds, which have attached to your suit, into soluble
    >compounds that just rinse away, so they don't just continue to eat away at the lycra between swims.
    >If you can smell the chlorine, you can be sure it's still working away at your suit.
    >
    >The problem with this is that it takes a little time, and you have to do it every time you swim.
    >You can't just do it once a week. Personally, I really hate that chlorine smell, so I really don't
    >mind the little extra time it takes to get rid of it. But, you know, suits don't cost all that
    >much, so it may just be better to replace them as needed, and not bother with the chemicals.
    >
    >

    We'll I've gotten into the habit of wearing jammers so they are a bit more expensive than
    the briefs. If it works It would definately be worth the investment, both time and money.

    Thanks

    ~Matt
     
  11. Dmitriy

    Dmitriy Guest

    Ross Bogue <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In <[email protected]> MJuric wrote:
    > >
    > > Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru
    > > on every couple of months.
    >
    >
    > Lycra, nylon, or poly?
    >
    > The lycra (typically 20% lycra + 80% nylon) suits are very comfortable, but only last a few
    > months of heavy use. Many of us use all nylon or all poly suits for workouts and save the lycra
    > suits for racing.
    >
    > Some people manage to extend the life of a lycra suit by careful washing and avoiding soaps. I
    > haven't had much luck that way myself, though.
    >
    >
    >
    > Ross

    I've used an Adidas poly training suit for over 3 years now, and it just keeps going. Never did any
    particular cleaning save for a rinse in the shower. I swim about 1.5-2 hours 6-7 times a week.
    Incidentally, has anyone any idea whether Adidas has gone out of swimwear business -- all catalogs
    used to carry a line of their stuff, but in the last few months I can't seem to find anything
    anywhere, even on the Internet. Any ideas where to get it?

    Thanks

    Dmitriy
     
  12. Michael

    Michael Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 22:50:04 +0000, 4precious wrote:

    > [email protected] (MJuric) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on
    >> every couple of months. While were on the subject is there any method for convincing a place to
    >> lower the chlorine content in a pool? Seems my regular is extremely high compared to others I've
    >> been in.
    >>
    >> ~Matt
    >
    > I'm a relative novice swimmer, so it's taken me a little time to figure out the suit thing. But
    > my punchline is: wear lycra suits. Replace when they become worn out and relatively see-through
    > (you will know this is the case when the coach on deck no longer EVER comes by your lane due to
    > the view :)
    >
    > Tried nylon. Lasts a bit longer although the color fades. However, the non-stretchable fabric is
    > such a pain compared to the elastic lycra.
    >
    > I'm going to buy three or four lycra speedo suits whenever the yearly sales occur at the local
    > swim shops.
    >
    > -Eric

    Heh - that's why one may choose to wear multiple suits - one may fail but there's strength in
    numbers ;p

    GL Mike
     
  13. Shannon

    Shannon Guest

    I must second the prior recommendation for the Speedo Endurance suits. They fit a little differently
    (aren't quite so stretchy) but they do last forever! Besides Allen's Swimwear
    (www.allensswimwear.co.uk) you can also get them from www.swimstation.com, also in the UK. Shipping
    is very inexpensive...
     
  14. Cipher

    Cipher Guest

    I use Tyr polyester jammers and they seem to last a long time. I swim at least 5 times a week for
    at least an hour. My first one is 6 month s old and it's still in good shape. I always rinse it out
    right after I hit the showers and then when I get home, I use some mild soap to wash them. The
    length that they survive in chlorinated water might also depend on how much chlorine is used by
    your pool.

    "MJuric" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 22:31:40 +0000 (UTC), Ross Bogue <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In <[email protected]> MJuric wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Any special procedure(s)/ Washes for protecting suits from chlorine damage? I'm going thru on
    > >> every couple of months.
    > >
    > >
    > >Lycra, nylon, or poly?
    > >
    > >The lycra (typically 20% lycra + 80% nylon) suits are very comfortable, but only last a few
    > >months of heavy use. Many of us use all nylon or all poly suits for workouts and save the lycra
    > >suits for racing.
    >
    > The suits that blow out in a couple of months are the Lycra/nylon blend. How much longer do the
    > all nylon typically last?
    >
    > >
    > >Some people manage to extend the life of a lycra suit by careful washing and avoiding soaps. I
    > >haven't had much luck that way myself, though.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >Ross
     
  15. Michael

    Michael Guest

    >>The lycra (typically 20% lycra + 80% nylon) suits are very comfortable, but only last a few
    >>months of heavy use. Many of us use all nylon or all poly suits for workouts and save the lycra
    >>suits for racing.
    >
    > The suits that blow out in a couple of months are the
    > Lycra/nylon blend. How much longer do the all nylon typically last?

    I had bought some 100% nylon suits, ummm, lesses - I'm pretty sure it was at '96 trials (the pool in
    motreal had a shop). I lost one, another had the stitching go ~ two years ago. I still wear the
    third though it's faded nearly to white & requires another suit. Unfortunately living in small town
    alberta the opportunites to buy (non mail order) quality swim wear are limited. I'd rather like to
    get a replacement, I think the current suit done it's due ;p

    GL Mike
     
  16. Peabody

    Peabody Guest

    MJuric says...

    > We'll I've gotten into the habit of wearing jammers so they are a bit more expensive than the
    > briefs. If it works It would definately be worth the investment, both time and money.

    For jammers I think you would need more than the 1/4 teaspoon of sodium thiosulfate that I use for
    briefs. The amount needed would depend upon the amount of material involved and whether you rinse
    the suit thoroughly in tap water after swimming.

    The best indicator is your nose. It will detect extremely small amounts of chlorine in the suit. So
    try maybe 1/2 teaspoon and then smell the suit after rinsing out the thiosulfate. If you still smell
    chlorine, use more next time.

    Oh, at your local chemical supply house you may find sodium thiosulfate, which is a plain powder, or
    sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate, which is more crystaline, like Epsom salt. You have to use more of
    the pentahydrate to get the same de-chlorinating effect. Another possible (more expensive) source
    would be a tropical fish store - I think they use the stuff to de-chlorinate tap water so the fish
    won't die.
     
  17. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 19:03:55 -0600, "Cipher" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I use Tyr polyester jammers and they seem to last a long time. I swim at least 5 times a week for
    >at least an hour. My first one is 6 month s old and it's still in good shape. I always rinse it out
    >right after I hit the showers and then when I get home, I use some mild soap to wash them. The
    >length that they survive in chlorinated water might also depend on how much chlorine is used by
    >your pool.

    I've been using this Tyr 78% Antron Nylon/22% Lycra Spandex suit for a year. I swim 3 or 4 times a
    week for about an hour. I wash it with a very little bit of whatever they have at the Y showers then
    rinse it thoroughly..

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  18. Rob

    Rob Guest

    [email protected] (Shannon) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I must second the prior recommendation for the Speedo Endurance suits. They fit a little
    > differently (aren't quite so stretchy) but they do last forever! Besides Allen's Swimwear
    > (www.allensswimwear.co.uk) you can also get them from www.swimstation.com, also in the UK.
    > Shipping is very inexpensive...

    The range at www.allensswimwear.co.uk is far superior to swimstation!
     
  19. Liz D

    Liz D Guest

    "Stuz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > As we in the Europe and the Antipodes keep reminding you in the Americas, you can get the Speedo
    > (and other makers) Endurance ranges here. They fit like a normal costume but they are
    > INDISTRUCTABLE!!

    Actually, in New Zealand, it's becoming difficult to find Speedo suits which *aren't* the Endurance
    (polyester) fabric.

    I have had a pair for nearly a year wearing 3-4 hours per week in the pool, and they look as good as
    new (which is saying something as some of the panels are bright yellow and haven't faded at all).

    However I must confess that I don't particularly like the fit and feel of the suit. It's lack of
    stretchy-ness takes a bit of getting used to and I also find the shoulder straps have a tendency to
    roll over on themselves and rub against the side of my neck, exacerbated by the fact that the
    surface of the fabric is coarser than the nylon/lycra fabric. This is obviously only a problem for
    women's suits and men's suits may not notice the un-stretchy-ness so much.

    For sea swimming, where chlorine protection isn't an issue, I much prefer nylon/lycra, and I have
    been having trouble finding a suitable pair recently (I like them with a zip up the back to minimise
    sun exposure). But I will reluctantly stick with the Endurance/polyester fabric for regular weekly
    pool swimming.

    Liz D
     
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