summer in Fl

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bryanquinn, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. bryanquinn

    bryanquinn New Member

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    O.K. it's hot, I don't mean warm, I mean slide off your seat at 7am in the morning hot. The kind of heat that makes you want to sell your beloved road bike and take up bowling kind of hot.
    Well maybe not sell your bike...just take up bowling while it's so hot you can feel your tires melting in the road.
    The reason for my post is that in this kind of weather my gloves are so wet an hour in to the ride I could ring them out and half fill a water bottle.
    This of course makes my fingers slip on the brake levers.
    I was thinking of a couple fixes for this. One...buy some long fingered gloves that have good grip on the fingers so no more slip. The only thing is I'm not sure what a good glove out there is for this. I don't want some thing that is bulky and loose thus causing an other problem all together. (Any suggestions would be great).
    The other was getting some sand paper type of material with glue on the back (maybe Home Depot would sell something like this?) and cut it and stick it to the levers. The bad thing about this is I'd hate to look at my fingers after a few hours on the bike.
    Sooooo...All that being said, I would love to hear from you guys about favorite long fingered gloves or any other solution to this problem. :)
    Any thoughts or suggestions would be much appreciated!
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    First, I pity you. No one should be forced to live and ride in Florida. Second, I guess I'm not clear on where you are slipping: are your hands slipping on the hoods, or are your fingers slipping on the actual levers themselves?

    In either case, one thing to consider is wearing wristbands to cut down on sweat that runs down your arms into your gloves. You can also use Shoe Goo or Seam Grip. Both products remain flexible and have, when cured, a tacky texture. You could leave a thin line(s) or dot(s) where ever you are slipping. Both are clear when cured. IMHO, Shoe Goo would be my first choice.
     
  3. bryanquinn

    bryanquinn New Member

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    Thanks for your reply! I am slipping on both the hoods and the levers. I never thought about using any thing like you mentioned. I will try one or the other soon.
     
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