Sunday walk

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Ray, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. Ray

    Ray Guest

    I have been retired for a couple of years and in the past we have done
    more cycling than walking but since my wife's hips started playing up
    I have started walking on my own. We have a good arrangement, she
    drops me off somewhere, goes to a pub and I have to walk there and
    then drive home!
    I found I could walk 3 miles easily and have built up to 8 miles, my
    longest walk so far.

    On Sunday I walked the mid section of the Sandstone Trail from
    Duckington to Beeston Castle. Well not quite to Beeston as I had to
    walk to The Pheasant at Burwardsley, an excellent pub that is very
    walker friendly. A total of 6 miles in just over 2 hours.
    During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!

    Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    normal Sunday's walk?

    --
    Regards
    Ray

    P.S. I enjoy reading the group and have learned a lot.
     
    Tags:


  2. Bryan Hall

    Bryan Hall Guest

    Nope - you're normal - you included a pub ;-)

    "Ray" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I have been retired for a couple of years and in the past we have done
    > more cycling than walking but since my wife's hips started playing up
    > I have started walking on my own. We have a good arrangement, she
    > drops me off somewhere, goes to a pub and I have to walk there and
    > then drive home!
    > I found I could walk 3 miles easily and have built up to 8 miles, my
    > longest walk so far.
    >
    > On Sunday I walked the mid section of the Sandstone Trail from
    > Duckington to Beeston Castle. Well not quite to Beeston as I had to
    > walk to The Pheasant at Burwardsley, an excellent pub that is very
    > walker friendly. A total of 6 miles in just over 2 hours.
    > During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    > brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    > replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    > worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!
    >
    > Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    > normal Sunday's walk?
    >
    > --
    > Regards
    > Ray
    >
    > P.S. I enjoy reading the group and have learned a lot.
    >
    >
     
  3. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from "Ray" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    > normal Sunday's walk?


    Being retired means it doesn't matter which day of the week it is

    Last year I aimed at 15 miles and 4000 feet of ascent as a reasonable
    walk. This year I seem to be aiming bit lower. Old age is catching up
    with me. If I was a woman I would be drawing my old age pension by now
    but Gordon Brown is too busy throwing our money at himself and other
    over rich parents to redress the biggest single injustice in the social
    security system today.

    FWIW I think 34 miles is a long trog for any day. Even at 4 mph and on
    the flat it is over 8 hours walking.

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year 134 summits
    New - 105 (Marilyns 14, Sweats 5, Outlying Fells 93)
    Repeats - 29 (Marilyns 11, Sweats 21, Wainwrights 16, Outlying Fells 2)
     
  4. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the
    wonderful person Roger <[email protected]> said
    >The message <[email protected]>
    >from "Ray" <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >
    >> Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    >> normal Sunday's walk?


    <snip>

    >FWIW I think 34 miles is a long trog for any day. Even at 4 mph and on
    >the flat it is over 8 hours walking.


    Not unreasonable in the summer maybe, when you can amble along for 12 or
    16 hours, but pushing it at this time of year, unless you enjoy walking
    in the dark.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  5. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > I have been retired for a couple of years and in the past we have done
    > more cycling than walking but since my wife's hips started playing up
    > I have started walking on my own. We have a good arrangement, she
    > drops me off somewhere, goes to a pub and I have to walk there and
    > then drive home!
    > I found I could walk 3 miles easily and have built up to 8 miles, my
    > longest walk so far.
    >
    > On Sunday I walked the mid section of the Sandstone Trail from
    > Duckington to Beeston Castle. Well not quite to Beeston as I had to
    > walk to The Pheasant at Burwardsley, an excellent pub that is very
    > walker friendly. A total of 6 miles in just over 2 hours.
    > During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    > brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    > replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    > worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!
    >
    > Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    > normal Sunday's walk?
    >


    Definitely not a normal Sunday walk! Tend to do 1 or 2 of these a year
    as charity walks, but these then take in some summits to make them a bit
    more challenging (this year it was around Coniston, with a pull up the
    Old Man)

    --
    Darren
     
  6. Geoff Berrow

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    I noticed that Message-ID:
    <[email protected]> from Ray contained the
    following:

    > During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    >brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    >replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    >worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!


    It's 12 miles by road according to theaa.com. Still, at 24 plus it's
    still a good way to go.
    >
    >Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    >normal Sunday's walk?


    Like most people have said you are limited by the amount of day light.
    My longest to date was on Sunday (10.5 miles) but I'm a newbie. Took
    about 5 hours including a lunch break. If you look at any walking
    websites you don't tend to see anything much longer than that and a lot
    of walks in books are often less.

    Perhaps many subscribers to this group possibly take it a bit more
    seriously than yer average walker (not including myself in that).
    --
    Geoff Berrow (put thecat out to email)
    It's only Usenet, no one dies.
    My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
    Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
     
  7. Ray

    Ray Guest

    "Geoff Berrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I noticed that Message-ID:
    > <[email protected]> from Ray contained
    > the
    > following:
    >
    >> During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    >>brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    >>replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    >>worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34
    >>miles!

    >
    > It's 12 miles by road according to theaa.com. Still, at 24 plus
    > it's
    > still a good way to go.
    >>

    I plotted the route using Fugawi and the distance, following the
    Sandstone Trail, from Beeston Castle carpark to the centre of
    Whitchurch is 17.1 miles.

    Regards
    Ray
     
  8. Geoff Berrow

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    I noticed that Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    from Ray contained the following:

    >> It's 12 miles by road according to theaa.com. Still, at 24 plus
    >> it's
    >> still a good way to go.
    >>>

    >I plotted the route using Fugawi and the distance, following the
    >Sandstone Trail, from Beeston Castle carpark to the centre of
    >Whitchurch is 17.1 miles.


    Ah well, perhaps the AA are being optimistic. :)

    I've walked part of the Sandstone trail and I know I couldn't keep up a
    constant 4 mph (you have to go faster than that to allow for
    breaks/stiles etc) and even at that speed it would take 8.5 hours.

    He's have to be running surely?

    --
    Geoff Berrow (put thecat out to email)
    It's only Usenet, no one dies.
    My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
    Simple RFDs http://www.ckdog.co.uk/rfdmaker/
     
  9. Rooney

    Rooney Guest

    On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 21:48:32 -0000, "Ray" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >I have been retired for a couple of years and in the past we have done
    >more cycling than walking but since my wife's hips started playing up
    >I have started walking on my own. We have a good arrangement, she
    >drops me off somewhere, goes to a pub and I have to walk there and
    >then drive home!
    >I found I could walk 3 miles easily and have built up to 8 miles, my
    >longest walk so far.
    >
    >On Sunday I walked the mid section of the Sandstone Trail from
    >Duckington to Beeston Castle. Well not quite to Beeston as I had to
    >walk to The Pheasant at Burwardsley, an excellent pub that is very
    >walker friendly. A total of 6 miles in just over 2 hours.
    > During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    >brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    >replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    >worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!
    >
    >Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    >normal Sunday's walk?


    Not exactly normal, though I have done the Sandstone Trail in a day
    (we added a bit and did 38). I wouldn't do it again because I prefer
    the central bit in the Peckforton hills to the rest of the route. For
    me, a normal local Sunday walk would be between 3 and 10 miles; a less
    frequent but common walk in the Peak or Lakes would be 10 - 20 miles;
    occasional walks around 25 miles. rare walks longer than that.
    The important bit is the pub. I've not been in the Pheasant - might
    look in over Christmas.

    --

    R
    o
    o
    n
    e
    y
     
  10. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from GSV Three Minds in a Can <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > >FWIW I think 34 miles is a long trog for any day. Even at 4 mph and on
    > >the flat it is over 8 hours walking.


    > Not unreasonable in the summer maybe, when you can amble along for 12 or
    > 16 hours, but pushing it at this time of year, unless you enjoy walking
    > in the dark.


    If you get a move on but the Sandstone Trail can't be entirely flat, it
    has at least one (easy) Marilyn on it. And for most of us a hour for
    every 4 miles on the map plus another for every 3000 feet of ascent (the
    not-so-well-known Chapmans Rule) is too hard a pace for a full day out.
    Most contributors here seem to have trouble keeping up with that slow
    coach Naismith. :)

    I have never been at all keen on walking on the flat so I have
    relatively limited experience of distances as long as 34 miles (over 8
    hour days is another matter of course). In fact I can recall exceeding
    34 miles within 24 hours only 8 times and the last of those must have
    been about 30 years ago.

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year 134 summits
    New - 105 (Marilyns 14, Sweats 5, Outlying Fells 93)
    Repeats - 29 (Marilyns 11, Sweats 21, Wainwrights 16, Outlying Fells 2)
     
  11. Rooney

    Rooney Guest

    On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 08:51:57 +0000, Geoff Berrow <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I noticed that Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >from Ray contained the following:
    >
    >>> It's 12 miles by road according to theaa.com. Still, at 24 plus
    >>> it's
    >>> still a good way to go.
    >>>>

    >>I plotted the route using Fugawi and the distance, following the
    >>Sandstone Trail, from Beeston Castle carpark to the centre of
    >>Whitchurch is 17.1 miles.

    >
    >Ah well, perhaps the AA are being optimistic. :)
    >
    >I've walked part of the Sandstone trail and I know I couldn't keep up a
    >constant 4 mph (you have to go faster than that to allow for
    >breaks/stiles etc) and even at that speed it would take 8.5 hours.
    >
    >He's have to be running surely?


    You can do it all in a long day - I don't go at 4mph! It *is* a long
    day though, and when we did it it was a frozen January day, the first
    and last sections done in darkness.

    --

    R
    o
    o
    n
    e
    y
     
  12. Mike Clark

    Mike Clark Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Ray
    <URL:mailto:[email protected]> wrote:
    [snip]
    > During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    > brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    > replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    > worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!
    >
    > Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    > normal Sunday's walk?
    >


    My wife and I usually tend to do between 20 and 30 km as a winter
    "Sunday walk". Our "moving average" according to the Garmin GPS is
    usually between 4.5 and 5 km per hour, so you are talking of about 6
    hours moving plus any refreshment or photography breaks.

    Mike
    --
    o/ \\ // |\ ,_ o Mike Clark
    <\__,\\ // __o | \ / /\, "A mountain climbing, cycling, skiing,
    "> || _`\<,_ |__\ \> | immunology lecturer, antibody engineer and
    ` || (_)/ (_) | \corn computer user"
     
  13. > I have been retired for a couple of years and in the past we have done
    > more cycling than walking but since my wife's hips started playing up
    > I have started walking on my own. We have a good arrangement, she
    > drops me off somewhere, goes to a pub and I have to walk there and
    > then drive home!



    Not sure which is the best deal here ...... a lonely walk but missing a
    pint?

    > I found I could walk 3 miles easily and have built up to 8 miles, my
    > longest walk so far.


    Reasonable distance for anyone.

    >
    > On Sunday I walked the mid section of the Sandstone Trail from
    > Duckington to Beeston Castle. Well not quite to Beeston as I had to
    > walk to The Pheasant at Burwardsley, an excellent pub that is very
    > walker friendly. A total of 6 miles in just over 2 hours.
    > During my walk I was overtaken by a walker who was walking at a
    > brisk pace and as he passed I asked him how far he had walked and he
    > replied. Beeston to Whitchurch and was on his way back to Beeston. I
    > worked this out when I returned home and it is a distance of 34 miles!
    >
    >Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    > normal Sunday's walk?


    Not many will answer Yes to that! Clare and I would normally do a 8/10 mile
    walk on the South Downs, sometimes stretching it out to 12 miles on a
    pleasant summers day. In the more mountainous regions, Lakes/Snowdonia, we
    would normally do 6/8 miles, depending on ascent. If I walk alone, I would
    generally look at 10 miles or so in the big hills ....... but not 34!


    --
    sandy saunders @ www.thewalkzone.co.uk

    'Mountains or Mole Hills ... summiting still
    brings the same excitement'
     
  14. Peter

    Peter Guest

    On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 21:48:32 -0000, "Ray" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >... a distance of 34 miles!
    >
    >Now my question is this. Is this what you guys and girls consider a
    >normal Sunday's walk?


    Not me. I'll typically do 10 - 15 miles in a day. (That's usually
    Saturday, though, rather than Sunday. Public transport, which I use to
    get me to the start and home from the finish, is generally far better
    on Saturdays.)

    Peter.
     
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