Sunday....

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doesnotcompute, Aug 16, 2003.

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  1. I shall be mostly seen in the Grizedale area of the Lake District with a girly pal of mine. Riding
    the trails and generally making silly arses of our selves :)

    No plan, just a map, some food and drink and a tool kit.

    Let you know how it goes some time after we recover!

    Enjoy your Sunday rides wherever you are;

    --

    Dnc
     
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  2. Doobrie

    Doobrie Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I shall be mostly seen in the Grizedale area of the Lake District with a girly pal of mine. Riding
    > the trails and generally making silly arses of our selves :) No plan, just a map, some food and
    > drink and a tool kit. Let you know how it goes some time after we recover! Enjoy your Sunday rides
    > wherever you are;

    lets not have 'all' the details, p'lease! ;) - is this the friend you were going to cycle to?
     
  3. doobrie wrote:

    > lets not have 'all' the details, p'lease! ;) - is this the friend you were going to cycle to?

    Yes it is her, that failed for various reasons, this weekend being the resultant "replanning".

    well that was an *interesting* days cycling.

    First of all - big BIG up to Coniston Mountain rescue team, and the ambulance/accident and emergency
    services of Barrow in Furness.

    Second up - to my ride partner - you did good in a potentially nasty situation - you should get a
    gold star for braveness.

    Having got there, kitted up and out on her chosen trail - the Hawkshead Moor trail, a "demanding" 10
    miler, off we went. We were doing well and had plenty of fun down the hils and flats, with the
    views, and plenty of pain on the climbs.

    At some point shortly after we declared we should consider stopping for lunch, she took a tumble,
    highsiding the bike. No idea why, just cruising downhill (not hurtling), as far as I could tell the
    brakes didn't lock up, she just went over the bars and hit the deck helmet first.

    I then realise "Shit, she's in my path and I can't get round her". I aim for her rear wheel which
    was warpped up by her lower legs and pray for a perfect front up, rear up, hop. It turns out I
    managed it okay, although in landing, trying to stop, turn and not lock the wheels all at the same
    time I also hit the deck. Fortunately I lowsided the bike and got up straightaway.

    I scrabble back towards my ride partner, realising she's not particularly conscious. Boy am I glad
    I've done several first aid courses - this is not the first time they've proved useful. She came
    round withing about 10 seconds (probably out for 20s in total). She was dazed, confused and blurry
    vision. After checking her contacts lenses were actually still in place ;) I decided that was enough
    to dial three 9's.

    Did all the usual first aid stuff whch I won't bore you with, needless to say she went into shock
    pretty badly, so despite being in the blazing sunshine she was soon wrapped up in jerseys and my
    ripstop waterproof.

    Now there was only one problem. I had a trail map. I had the correct O/S map. I can read an OS map
    AND use a compass. None of which is any good if you don't have ANYTHING to take a bearing from.
    Nothing at all, no pylons, no roads, no lakes, nothing obvious at all. I give a best guestimate to
    the controller, promising to stop any passers and get a better grid ref. Controller realises
    wherever we are, we're inside the park and therefore the gates will be locked - mountain rescue will
    be needed to get to us quickest and through the gates.

    A passer by knows pretty much where we are so I give some much better and entirely more accurate
    refs, which proved to be good enough to get the team to us. Thanks to that passer by.

    MTR team arrives, checks everything I've done, agrees, she's probably fine (in terms of serious
    injury) but takes no chances, neck brace, inflatable body brace, stretcher and away we go, bikes on
    the roof, kit in the back and off down the fire roads to the awaiting amublance.

    I realise by this time my right elbow hurts, and my whole forearm is covered in vivid claret. Oh
    well at least I'm going to the best place! and this really is the least of my concerns for now.

    Ambulance tech. also agrees everything is ok, but won't take any chances, so she's whizzed off to A
    and E at Barrow, some 20 odd minutes away. MTR rescue give me a lift back to the visitor centre with
    the bikes where I load up the car and get across to Barrow.

    Summary, I have gravel rash, which will scar - merely an addition to a collection. She has a couple
    of small but deep cuts, a lot of bruising and not much else. This is good luck all round.

    Her helmet is beyond use. I daren't even think "what if.." Tomorrow we will both ache very much, but
    we'll be happy to be alive and itching to get back out on the road sometime soon.

    Many many thanks to all those that helped, I really hated calling them out at Sunday lunchtime, but
    was very grateful that they existed. There will be donations and thanks heading their way.

    By the way, chlorohexidine, is the single most painful nasty stuff in the world ever. I've broken
    bones, had 15 hours of tattooing, had body piercings with 3 mm thick needles and other painful
    stuff, and none of them compare to the pain that is Hibiscrubs finest applied with a scrubbing
    brush. Even the lignocaine local anaesthesia didn't help with that pain.

    --
    Dnc
     
  4. Philthy

    Philthy Guest

    > First of all - big BIG up to Coniston Mountain rescue team, and the ambulance/accident and
    > emergency services of Barrow in Furness.

    Total Kudo's<sic> to you for your quick thinking & I hope you are all OK & back on the trail soon.
    Glad to say my saturday trip round Pontop In county durham went without incident. Regards Phil
     
  5. Doobrie

    Doobrie Guest

    > Yes it is her, that failed for various reasons, this weekend being the resultant "replanning".
    >
    > well that was an *interesting* days cycling.

    good to know you'll both be ok. you've definately highlighted an excellent reason to carry a gps
    unit on those sort of trips but way to go dnc / mobile phone / rescue / passers by / hosp - its only
    times like these we can take a step back and think how excellent some of the services we can use
    really are.

    take it easy now, no downhilling until at least next weekend!
     
  6. Philthy wrote:
    >>First of all - big BIG up to Coniston Mountain rescue team, and the ambulance/accident and
    >>emergency services of Barrow in Furness.
    >
    >
    > Total Kudo's<sic> to you for your quick thinking & I hope you are all OK & back on the trail soon.
    > Glad to say my saturday trip round Pontop In county durham went without incident.

    Yeah we're okay. Battered and bruised, she's aching all over, me just down the right hand side.

    we're both 2nd day achers, so tomorrow will tell the tales for sure!

    I had to keep reminding her that it "just one of those things" nobodies fault, and that we could
    easily have been pedestrians and tripped, joggers and fell, drivers and crashed - just life's way of
    waking us up.

    I'll be back on the bike tomorrow morning on my way to work, she promises me she'll be back on at
    the weekend.

    Ride safe, and wear a helmet off road!

    --
    Dnc
     
  7. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Doesnotcompute" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Philthy wrote:
    > >>First of all - big BIG up to Coniston Mountain rescue team, and the ambulance/accident and
    > >>emergency services of Barrow in Furness.
    > >
    > > Total Kudo's<sic> to you for your quick thinking & I hope you are
    all OK &
    > > back on the trail soon. Glad to say my saturday trip round Pontop In
    county
    > > durham went without incident.
    >
    > Yeah we're okay. Battered and bruised, she's aching all over, me just down the right hand side.

    May I recommend Nelson's Arnica cream here?

    > we're both 2nd day achers, so tomorrow will tell the tales for sure!
    >
    > I had to keep reminding her that it "just one of those things"
    nobodies
    > fault, and that we could easily have been pedestrians and tripped, joggers and fell, drivers and
    > crashed - just life's way of waking us
    up.

    Indeed. Fortunately with no long-term consequences.

    > I'll be back on the bike tomorrow morning on my way to work, she promises me she'll be back on at
    > the weekend.
    >
    > Ride safe, and wear a helmet off road!

    I can't understand why no-one has posted to say that the helmet was actually the cause of the
    accident. They normally do.

    Best wishes for recovery and easy healing
    --
    Mark South: Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net "I wonder why so many Finnish traditions are
    related with booze?"
    - Juha Sakkinen
     
  8. Mark South wrote:

    >>Yeah we're okay. Battered and bruised, she's aching all over, me just down the right hand side.
    >
    >
    > May I recommend Nelson's Arnica cream here?
    >

    You can, although you'd be preacing to the converted. Along with some Zinc/copper. I'll also be on
    the lookout for AloeVera gel ready for when this initial dressing comes off.

    >>Ride safe, and wear a helmet off road!
    >
    >
    > I can't understand why no-one has posted to say that the helmet was actually the cause of the
    > accident. They normally do.

    I was actually wondering, if the fact she'd left her helmet at home, and we took the risk (in money
    terms) of hiring a helmet might actually have caused the accident in some "chaos theory" way.

    > Best wishes for recovery and easy healing

    Many thanks

    --
    Dnc
     
  9. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Doesnotcompute <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You can, although you'd be preacing to the converted. Along with some Zinc/copper. I'll also be on
    > the lookout for AloeVera gel ready for when this initial dressing comes off.

    AloeVera as a plant is surprisingly easy to grow - we have a very large, and well used one, in the
    kitchen window.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  10. Sandy Morton wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Doesnotcompute <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>You can, although you'd be preacing to the converted. Along with some Zinc/copper. I'll also be on
    >>the lookout for AloeVera gel ready for when this initial dressing comes off.
    >
    >
    > AloeVera as a plant is surprisingly easy to grow - we have a very large, and well used one, in the
    > kitchen window.
    >

    Interesting to know, especially as the extract is usually expensive. How do you use it in raw
    format? how much do you need to use?

    --
    Dnc
     
  11. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Doesnotcompute
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > AloeVera as a plant is surprisingly easy to grow - we have a very large, and well used one, in
    > > the kitchen window.
    > >

    > Interesting to know, especially as the extract is usually expensive. How do you use it in raw
    > format? how much do you need to use?

    One leaf(?) produces about a third of a cupful of gel. SWAMBO, who is now sleeping, tells us how
    much to use. The gel is well rubbed in to the affected area.

    I have just checked and the plant is in a 12inch pot and has about 30 useable leaves and about 90
    smaller ones which will soon grow bigger.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.sandymillport.fsnet.co.uk
     
  12. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Doesnotcompute must be edykated coz e writed:

    > Sandy Morton wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Doesnotcompute
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> You can, although you'd be preacing to the converted. Along with some Zinc/copper. I'll also be
    >>> on the lookout for AloeVera gel ready for when this initial dressing comes off.
    >>
    >>
    >> AloeVera as a plant is surprisingly easy to grow - we have a very large, and well used one, in
    >> the kitchen window.
    >>
    >
    > Interesting to know, especially as the extract is usually expensive. How do you use it in raw
    > format? how much do you need to use?
    Aloe grows as a weed in most of the Caribbean islands, it is quite easy to grow here, although will
    not reach the height it does over there, to use it the best solution is to cut off a leaf, split it
    down the thin edge and apply the "wet" side directly to the skin, you can put in in the fridge and
    it will be ok for a couple of days, and will be nice and cool when you put it on.

    --
    Ian

    http://www.catrike.co.uk
     
  13. Sandy Morton wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Doesnotcompute
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>AloeVera as a plant is surprisingly easy to grow - we have a very large, and well used one, in
    >>>the kitchen window.
    >>>
    >
    >
    >>Interesting to know, especially as the extract is usually expensive. How do you use it in raw
    >>format? how much do you need to use?
    >
    >
    > One leaf(?) produces about a third of a cupful of gel. SWAMBO, who is now sleeping, tells us how
    > much to use. The gel is well rubbed in to the affected area.
    >
    > I have just checked and the plant is in a 12inch pot and has about 30 useable leaves and about 90
    > smaller ones which will soon grow bigger.
    >

    Excellent, thanks for that, looks like a trip to the garden centre instead of the chemists then!

    --
    Dnc
     
  14. The Mark

    The Mark Guest

    Sandy Morton wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Doesnotcompute
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> AloeVera as a plant is surprisingly easy to grow - we have a very large, and well used one, in
    >>> the kitchen window.
    >>>
    >
    >> Interesting to know, especially as the extract is usually expensive. How do you use it in raw
    >> format? how much do you need to use?
    >
    > One leaf(?) produces about a third of a cupful of gel. SWAMBO, who is now sleeping, tells us how
    > much to use. The gel is well rubbed in to the affected area.
    >
    > I have just checked and the plant is in a 12inch pot and has about 30 useable leaves and about 90
    > smaller ones which will soon grow bigger.

    <Useless information alert>

    It grows quite large in warmer climates such as Venezuella, Aruba, and Africa. In Yemen the resin is
    collected by cutting the leaves and letting it run out and drain into a sewn up dried goat skin.
    --
    Mark Road bike, Mountain bike and I'm getting something special built for me (I hope it will
    arrive soon).
     
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