Sunglasses - Oakley Jawbone vs. Rudy Project Mask

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by 2SteppinOnYou, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. 2SteppinOnYou

    2SteppinOnYou New Member

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    Hey guys -
    I've narrowed it down to two pair of shades that I want to end up with. Oakley's new Jawbone line ($250 polarized) and Rudy Project's SportMask Performance ($179 - $199).

    I've been shocked at how many reviews have sent people for the Rudy Projects .. . . and just wanted to know if anybody has any experience with either of these two and what advice you may have for me with regards to them. They both fit my face well and so they have both got me there and are comfortable. From what I understand, Oakley takes the cake with regards to lens clarity, etc and they are polarized. However, not only would I be saving $50 with the Rudy Projects (arguably because of the lack of polarization), they have virtually no frame (less blind spots) but they have a deal right now where if you purchase a lens for $199, they will throw in a helmet,Spare Lens, t-shirt, hat, and backpack. All great but if the glasses aren't superior, then who cares.

    Your advice/input is greatly appreciated.
     
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  2. Dietmar

    Dietmar New Member

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    I would advise against the Rudy Project. At least for me, because of the lack of a frame, and the thin uncoated plastic bars that go behind the ears, those glasses are less stiff and tend to easily slip down, and I found myself constantly adjusting them. Until I ended the annoyance by getting a pair of Oakleys.
     
  3. 2SteppinOnYou

    2SteppinOnYou New Member

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    Wow - somebody actually says no to Rudy - I was definitely starting to question the Oakleys based on reading reviews. .
    Anybody have any reasons to NOT get polarized lenses?
    I use them for the Boat and Skiing and they are great, but have never had them on the bike.
     
  4. Dietmar

    Dietmar New Member

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    Well, on the water and in snow, the polarized glasses are a clear bonus; less so on the road. They won't hurt, either, but the advantage (if any) you get from the polarized glasses compared to regular ones will definitely be minor. If you don't mind the extra 50 bucks, get the polarized ones, otherwise I doubt you'll see much of a difference (other than in your wallet). Unless you ride around lakes all the time, of course... :cool:

    P.S.: Oh, and based on my experience, I would rate my Oakleys as clearly superior, with a lot more thought having gone into their design, and how that design will work in practice. This is for Oakley Radars, though, mind you. I haven't seen or used the new Jawbones.
     
  5. neeb

    neeb New Member

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    I've just bought the jawbones and I like them a lot. Used M Frames before. I think the frame issue is a personal thing (or maybe a face size / eye spacing thing), I don't find it blocks my vision at all when looking behind, there is just a vague awareness of the edge of the frame at the extreme periphery of my vision, and the extra coverage compared with most other glasses (inc. M Frame sweep) more than makes up for it.

    I have polarized lenses but to be honest, they offer no real advantage for cycling (although big advantages if you are on/near water), and may even be a disadvantage as you can see things you don't need to see, like the irregular refraction patterns in your computer display... The most noticeable experience for me with the polarized lenses on the bike is that those smooth seams you sometimes get on tarmac where the road has been repaired look oddly spangly-matt instead of shiny. It actually makes them stand out more though, which is not a bad thing. You get the same effect with jam on toast if you eat breakfast outside with your shades on. Kind of weird, but not unpleasant...:)

    Far more useful than polarization is the permanent hydrophobic coating, it really does work. Don't know if RP has something similar or not.
     
  6. 2SteppinOnYou

    2SteppinOnYou New Member

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    Thanks for the input guys -

    Went and picked up a pair of the jawbones. Figured I'd try them out. If I don't like them, I'll bring them back and try the Radars.
     
  7. rob303

    rob303 New Member

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    I have been a Rudy wearer for a few years now, coming off 15 years wearing Oakley and some other notable brands. The only thing I can say is, where were these guys when i was wasting money on Oakley & Co.?!

    As someone suggested earlier, the Sportmask can be problematic for some with slippage, but to save weight you sacrifice the adjustable temples Rudy is known for. Its all about what is most important, besides I know many people that absolutely love the Sportmask. All of our heads are different shapes and things fit differently.

    Too bad you went for the Jawbone. I had a chance to try those out at a demo last weekend and they were heavy with limited view. I just bought the new Rudy Project Noyz with Rudy's new Free Gear Deal and those things are sooooo comfortable. Adjustable temples and nose piece along with great visibility and a slew of sweet lens options. A lot of guys in the Giro and Tour were wearing these.

    Rudy Project Rudy Project Noyz Matte Black With Smoke Lenses
     
  8. 2SteppinOnYou

    2SteppinOnYou New Member

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    I've got 30 days to return them so I'll get to mess with them this weekend on the road. . . . :)
     
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