Supersix Evo 105 5 2015 Vs Synapse Carbon 105 2015?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Xcessiv, Feb 25, 2015.

?

Best option?

  1. SuperSix Evo 105 5 2015

    3 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. Synapse Carbon 105 2015

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. CAAD10 105 2015

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Xcessiv

    Xcessiv New Member

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    Hey :D

    I'm looking for a secondary bike (primary one being a Cervelo S3 2014 6800) for:
    - commuting to work (with average road quality)
    - trips (plane)
    - races where the conditions aren't ideal for the Cervelo (heavy rain, dirt, etc)

    With my racing team, I now have a sponsorship with Cannondale so the intuitive options are:
    - SuperSix Evo 5 2015
    - Synapse Carbon 2015

    Since it's a secondary bike, and since the 105 5800 components are well rated, I would probably opt for this gruppo.

    My dilemmas:
    - The Synapse is a 160$ extra compared to the Evo
    - I would sometimes race it, let's say 10% of the time
    - My commuting to work also represents 75% of my training program, so I need a bike that won't cause too much adaptation issue when racing my Cervelo S3
    - On the other hand, the roads here are pretty bad so I wouldn't want to suffer injuries from using a very stiff bike when commuting
    - Also, am I right when saying that under heavy rain, the Synapse would be slightly more stable than the Evo due to road absorption?

    I also put the CAAD10 in the options just in case, but please note that the sponsorship isn't as interesting, making it only 240$ cheaper than the Evo.

    Thanks!
     
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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Your assumptions sound correct. Test rides are always desirable, but a man's got to ask himself...what would Ivan Basso do?

    SuperSix Evo and if the roads are that bad, drop the tires to 95 PSI. You'll look faster even with the rear end jumping around!

    "Show the chip and seal who's boss!" Who writes their add copy? An 'endurance' bike for chip & seal? Yeesh.
     
  3. Xcessiv

    Xcessiv New Member

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    Thanks for the info, I'm leaning towards the SS Evo.

    My sponsor offered a pretty good alternate option, what do you think?

    For an additional 350$, I would get:
    - Ultegra 6800 vs 105 5800
    - FSA SL-K Light Carbon vs FSA Gossamer Pro
    - Mavic Aksium S vs Shimano RS11
    - Carbon fiber seat post vs aluminium seat post
    - Handlebar/stem Cannondale C2 vs C3 (not sure about the difference)
    - Fi'zi:k Arione CX w/ mg rails vs Prologo Scratch Pro T2.0

    I would keep the bike 1 year, maybe 2... So the resale value has to be taken into account.
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I like the Ultegra upgrade, but any performance benefit will be a wash. Maybe save a few grams.
    SL-K is a better crankset. Again, a few grams lighter too.
    Aksiums are GREAT wheels IMO. Perfect for training and racing. I've used Aksiums for the last four years. No complaints.
    Carbon seatpost 'might' smooth out the ride a little. Make sure setbacks on both are to your fit/position on the bike.
    No clue re: the bars.
    Saddles are whatever fits you. Otherwise, sell it off to a friend.

    Resale value? Don't even go there. Used bikes, especially carbon framed ones, lose value faster than the slut that screwed the entire football team on prom night. They really drop like a rock. Unless the bike has historical significance or is in some esoteric way of value to bike collectors...it's just not an investment purchase.

    In this arena the Evo, Synapse and CAAD are all in the same rapidly sinking boat.

    Basically, the condition of the bike after a year or two will determine its resale price more than the model. The Ultegra would add some value over 105, but on a 2-year old bike? Maybe a hundred bucks or so out of the extra $200 (or there about figured into that $350 upgrade price). Also, if you are buying a 60 CM or larger...good luck getting any money out of that. Or a 52 CM or smaller. It's slightly less of an issue offing a super-small frame, but it can still limit the market significantly.

    If it were me and I was throwing this bike around criterium corners with the talentless local squid Cat racers I line up with...the less I had invested, the better. As usual, YMMV and always buy the bike that fits best and looks best to your eye.
     
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  5. Xcessiv

    Xcessiv New Member

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    Very informative. I would get it at almost 50% off, hoping to resell it without too much money lost after 1-2 years... But didn't think about the warranty only being offered to the original owner which would kill the value for carbon frames especially.

    It would be a 48cm frame, you're right but the demand is sometimes surprisingly good for these.
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    The wimenz of the female persuasion boost short frame market value. Couple that with the modern era trend of guys to go for 'the look' with a mile of seatpost sticking out with a 130/140 MM stem and suddenly guys that normally ride a 52 are downsizing for the pricetag slash.
     
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