Supplements...Necessary or Not??

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by RalleighOke, Feb 7, 2003.

  1. RalleighOke

    RalleighOke New Member

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    Is supplements necessary or not?

    By taking supplements, are we not in fact weakening our body by giving it artificial "power". Surely we can get our necessary nutrients from our daily meals.

    I'm not an expert in this field, but I have never used supplements and just want to know if it is in fact such a necessity for cycling.

    If it is so what supplements would you recommend or what are you currently using that's working for you.

    My viewpoint always have been that doing it natural will strengten the body rather than "supplementing" it.

    What is your views and opinion?
     
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  2. Vo2

    Vo2 Member

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    That really depends on the nutritional value of what you consider to be your daily meals. Most of the people I work with have some sarmies during the day, which they "supplement" with a packet of crisps and a Coke. At night, they pop over the road for McDonalds and ice-cream. I know very few people that bring fruits and veggies to work along with their sarmies or other grub for the day.
    The majority of people don't eat the right foods or combination of foods. As an athlete, you need to be more conscientious of what, when and how you eat if you want to improve your performance. Many athletes use supplements such as protein, but whether you need any supplementation or not can only be established thro the analysis of your eating plan done by a dietician or nutritionlist.
     
  3. RalleighOke

    RalleighOke New Member

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    Me lika theee pasta!!

    That's about a mouthful, I didn't know you needed to see a dietician to establish that...Shows you, you learn new things everyday.

    Thanks for that info Vo2, as for me, I'll keep on "supplementing" my system with nice Pizza, Chips, Castle :D and then work it off the following morning....just joking.
     
  4. Spire

    Spire New Member

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    It can frequently be VERY hard to get enough protein in ones diet to satify the requirements of a hard ride or workout. This is especially true for vegetairans. I do use protein powder, but that's about it.
     
  5. steve

    steve Administrator
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    I'm not sure this is in fact true, did you come to this conclusion because of sly marketing or facts?
     
  6. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    There was a thread on this a while back -- perhaps someone will know where it is! Suffice it to say, that protein requirements for the general population are very small, and not that much greater for your typical club endurance athlete. Even at the very highest levels (e.g., TdF), where demand is highest, protein requirements are very low (i.e., ~1.5 - 2.0 grams of protein per kg body mass per day). For typical club athletes (requirements are ~1.2 - 1.8 g/kg BM if you are training intensely). for less intense periods, ~ 0.8 - 1.2 g/kg BM) would be fine.

    Data from research shows that countries such as the USA, UK, Australia (i haven't seen research on other countries, but i would expect other similar types of country to be similar) has shown that the general population consume a surfiet of protein, that at least meets and often exceeds upper limits of protein intake.

    With an endurance athlete who will have to eat more food to meet energy demands of the sport, they will easily meet or exceed the protein requirements.

    This holds true for vegetarians as well, especially ones who are for e.g., ovo-lactose vegetarians. Even vegans can meet or exceed the protein requirements without too much bother.

    On the other hand the carbohydrate requirements to fuel endurance activities are in excess of three times the protein requirements (e.g., 6 - 10 g carbohydrate per kg body mass per day) -- and this often requires athletes to supplement their diet as carbohydrates can be quite bulky.

    Ric
     
  7. Spire

    Spire New Member

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    You're comment as well as ricstern's are well taken. I was saying that just by doing head calcuations. I figure that I should have about 80-100g of protein a day (at 70kg body weight) and that can be difficult to attain without some sort of suppliment according to the sides of foods as I eat them. What types of foods do you eat to get your protein?
     
  8. rebel365

    rebel365 New Member

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    While I consider myself a casual cyclist, I still believe that supplementing is of prime importance. I believe that you need to ensure pre-training and recovery are optimal. I have read and studied the subject and there seems to be consensus on the eed to supplement.

    I recently attended a talk by Heather Livingstone, Head of Sports Nutrition with Herbalife. She also represented the US in waterpolo at the Olympics. She provided a regimen that should be followed by most people and athletes need it as well.

    One area is pre-training. Many people just don't eat anything. Clearly this is incorrect. A easily digestible meal even balanced meal shake is important.

    Post training is important because you need to replenish lost carbs, nutrients, etc very soon after the session - within first half hour is a window where absorption is very high. A carbo drink or balanced meal drink does this for you. I have a great recipe for this.

    After that a protein intake together with anti-oxidants is important for recovery and to prevent sickness.

    I am also a Herbalife Distributor so I have more info and can supply some products that I find very useful.

    Remember that Bjarne Riis also used these specific products on the road to winning the TdF a few years back

    email me if interested

    Ciao
     
  9. easyrider

    easyrider New Member

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    Riis used a lot more than some legal supplements on his way to the TdF title. The peloton nicknamed him, "Mr. 60%" for a reason.
     
  10. RalleighOke

    RalleighOke New Member

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    What is your views on Perc Product (Winners Fuel and Carboload):confused:
     
  11. rebel365

    rebel365 New Member

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    I have not used Perc myself but I guess the difference between most products is minimal with personal preference being the driver. I would look at the labels. remember, that it is still difficult to ascertain the quality of the ingredients from the label, though.

    Having said that, I did however think Cytomax was superb but expensive. I find the bigger problem being the amount to drink. I generally do not drink enough. Only when I am tired do I drink more - probably too late then.

    For training, I use some local products (I forgot the name). For pre- training, I use Herbalife meal supplement and post-training as well. However, post-training, I also take a Herbalife protein mix and a variety of anti-ox, vit C, Tang-Kuei (if muscles sore) and Omega 3 supplements.
     
  12. RalleighOke

    RalleighOke New Member

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    Sounds very expensive:eek:
     
  13. stebbo

    stebbo New Member

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    You might like to look at these websites.

    http://www.supplementwatch.com/
    A nice site that looks at not surprisingly supplements

    http://www.quackwatch.org/
    A site run by a US physician looking a "alternative" medicine and some of the 'sharp' practice that goes on.

    The quackwatch site can keep you enthralled for hours

    :)
     
  14. xavier

    xavier New Member

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    You may be mixed up with the word supplement. Supplements are not illegal aids but just that - Supplements.

    All pro riders take supplements, you have to or you cannot go on training daily.

    For example nearly all riders take B12 shots in the past. This is normal and natural. However sadly it has been replaced with EPO and other new substances to create the same effect twofold and much faster.

    Mineral and carbo drinks are considered supplements.
     
  15. VeloFlash

    VeloFlash New Member

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    At the 2000 Olympics, all athletes were required to declare the (obviously legal) supplements they were taking for the purposes of future drug testing.

    I understand the cost of the weekly supply of some high profile athletes would absorb an average weekly salary!

    These athletes have access to the leading edge sports medicine research and I doubt they would have partaken without reasonable justification
     
  16. bomber

    bomber New Member

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    has anyone ever used FIT products as i hear they are excellent and i see that many pros use (are paid too use?) these products!! Any opinions:confused: :rolleyes:
     
  17. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    It *might* (I've no evidence one way or another) be normal for pro riders to take B12, but it's certainly *not* natural or required.

    B12, doesn't have the same effect as Epo

    Ric
     
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