Supplements to help eliminate excess muscle pump?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by its38, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. its38

    its38 New Member

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    Are there any supplements to eliminate excess muscle pump when riding? I am also a bodybuilder and in that sport you always try and lift to achieve maximum muscle pump, but when I go riding I have a really hard time as my legs immediately begin to pump up like I'm lifting and become very tight and painful. Any ideas?
     
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  2. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    That's because your muscles are used to high-load, shorter period stimulation. I recall going boating some years ago when all I did was squat and my legs blew up like baloons pedaling the boat (it had a pedal-propulsion system).
    It sounds to me like you have fully developed quads and tight leg-muscles so you need to stretch as much as possible.
    If bodybuilding is your primary objective I'd personally advise doing your cycle ride prior to your leg work-out if you can stomach it. If you ride after your cycle work-out, this might inhibit muscle growth.
    If your goal is to attain a certain level of cycling performance as well as having a good physique, you need to cycle more, perhaps, and should find that your leg muscles will pump up less over time as they become more aerobically adapted.
    I used to bodybuild too but these days I mainly ride.



     
  3. its38

    its38 New Member

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    Agree, I know that's the main cause. I was just thinking that there are so many bodybuilding supplements that help increase muscle pump that there may be something to help reduce it as well. I was thinking along the lines of maybe something that helps blood flow like aspirin or something.
     
  4. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    There is no scientific evidence to support the claim that more pump builds more muscle mass.

    Many a power lifter and olympic lifter have developed quite impressive physiques doing no more than a few reps with lots of rest between sets. Certainly not enough to obtain the quintessential pump that bodybuilders strive for.

    The pump is simple a side effect from training. It is the result of the body's inability to clear away waste products (mainly lactic acid) quickly enough. Those waste products have nothing to do with buiding muscle mass. Cross sectional muscle size increases from the stimulus of increased resistance training.
     
  5. its38

    its38 New Member

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    I understand and know that but anybody that bodybuilds will tell you the mind/muscle connection needed to isolate the muscle to train properly will produce a significant pump, really independant of cardio conditioning. I've done both, endurance sports and short duration high intensity.

    Regardless, this was not my question (sorry if that sounds rude, it's not meant to be). I was simply asking if there are any nutritional supplements that can combat the muscle pump I am experiencing, There are about 10 very effective supplements that create a more "pumped" feeling when lifting through one mechanism or another, I was thinking that there has to be a way for the opposite to be acheived. Thanks.
     
  6. CatSpin

    CatSpin New Member

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    Its38,

    As an ex-bodybuilder, I had the same problem. I did not find anything ergogenic to combat the problem aside from continued cycling training. To this end, I would suggest you use mid gearing as those who suggest high cadence may not be use to the side effects of a bodybuilder's muscles spinning at high cadence.

    1. they burn out easily
    2. they blow up like ballons

    I suggest you continue to ride mid to bigger gears. As you condition your muscles to do this cross training (cycling) you can start to introduce other cycling techniques and training.

    For the time being, NO on an anti-pump supplement, YES on new training principles for your legs. Thereafter, you can look for supplements specific for your cycling performance.

    Good luck big guy,

    CatSpin
     
  7. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    This statment in your first post - I am also a bodybuilder and in that sport you always try and lift to achieve maximum muscle pump - led me to believe that you weren't aware of that.

    I don't know of any supplements that will expidite the body's removal of lactic acid. Many of the supplements that affect a person's pump are due more to water retention than anything else and as such are not healthy. Unless there is a physical ailment, the body should regulate it's own water retention.

    Try spinning the cranks at higher RPMs. That will keep the forces on your quads low and place the stress on your cardiovascular system. It will take a significant amount of training to actually raise your lactate threshold and then it will probably only rise a few percent. Mashing the pedals in larger gears may be causing some of the pump you are experiencing.
     
  8. Kakashi

    Kakashi Active Member

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    An easy solution is spend less time at the gym and more time cycling, this would relax your muscles a bit, adapting to cycling.
     
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