"sure fire" supplements

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Claire Petersky, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. "Davykoh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi there,
    > Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    > find out what are
    > the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance. Things like
    > L-
    > carnitine, L- glutamine, Coenzyme Q10 and the likes.
    > Care to share your real experience here?



    Paging Fabrizio!

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    http://www.bicyclemeditations.org/
    Sponsor me for the Big Climb! See: www.active.com/donate/cpetersky06
    See the books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
    Tags:


  2. Davykoh wrote:
    > Hi there,
    > Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    > find out what are
    > the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance. Things like L-
    > carnitine, L- glutamine, Coenzyme Q10 and the likes.
    > Care to share your real experience here?
    >


    Some old european dinosaur named Eddy Merckx used to recommend "Ride
    Lots". I'm not sure if it's still available in the US.
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Davykoh" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    > find out what are
    > the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance.


    Gatorade works pretty well for me.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich Guest

    Davykoh wrote:
    > Hi there,
    > Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    > find out what are
    > the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance. Things like L-
    > carnitine, L- glutamine, Coenzyme Q10 and the likes.
    > Care to share your real experience here?


    H2O
     
  5. > Davykoh wrote:
    >> Hi there,
    >> Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    >> find out what are
    >> the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance. Things like
    >> L-
    >> carnitine, L- glutamine, Coenzyme Q10 and the likes.
    >> Care to share your real experience here?
    >>

    >
    > Some old european dinosaur named Eddy Merckx used to recommend "Ride
    > Lots". I'm not sure if it's still available in the US.


    Not to mention Pot Belge...

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. Inject testosterone. Remember, folks, testosterone is testosterone.
    It is a specific molecule, and it's the same for all animal species.
    You can buy it at the animal supply store, intended for injection into
    stallions so they can cover more mares. Just do an IM injection every
    day, a couple of hours before your ride. Ask your family doctor about
    the correct dose. If your doctor disapproves, tell him he's a pussy
    and find a different doctor. Believe me, you'll feel like you're
    flying, in more ways than one!!!
     
  7. Davykoh wrote:
    SNIP

    Dave -- eat less processed food and more vegetables. Especially green
    leafy ones (like spinach), cruciferous ones (broccoli, cabbage,
    cauliflower) and whatever's in season (tastier and less expensive). As
    for macronutrients (carbohydrates/proteins/fats) please consult with a
    credentialed, trained Registered Dietician (not a "Nutritionist" or the
    clerk at the health food store) as to amount and proportion, but I
    betcha if you reduce (that's right, eat less of them!) your overall
    macronutient inputs, you'll gain in performance as you lose weight off
    the frame. Your frame, that is. However, I've found that I've had to
    change my riding style after executing this tip myself: When I dropped
    60 pounds I found that while climbing the steeper local hills I had to
    go from standing up and mashing the pedals to spinning, or at least a
    faster cadance. I'd lost torque....

    DIRTY LITTLE SECRET THE DIET DOCTORS DON'T TELL YOU: The medical
    specialty that includes metabolism in the job description is
    endocrinology. As much as anyone, endocrinologists know off the cuff,
    to the extent of our knowledge, how food gets from inside the gut to
    inside your cells. Here's the nasty part: ASIDE from Doctor Bernstein,
    who is up front in describing his diet as one especially designed for
    very sick people , there is NO famous diet named after an endo.
    Cardiologists, holisticians, dermatologists, yeah, but no endos. THEY'D
    be dancing in the streets if we all just ate less.


    As for MICRONUTRIENTS, well, if you are eating more vegetables you'll
    be getting more of hwat you need. Otherwise, any standard multivitamin
    should fill in most of the remaining gaps. Same money for a new jersey
    and buy the pharmacy or grocery store's own brand. You're going to need
    the new jersey when you lose weight.

    But dont't take my word for it: Get your HMO to pay for a consultation
    with a Registered Dietician, and learn all sorts of portion control and
    measuration tricks! HINT: Just becuase the rubber rice bounces higher
    than the rubber apple doesn't mean you should bounce either one.


    Robert Leone [email protected]
     
  8. Davykoh

    Davykoh Guest

    Hi there,
    Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    find out what are
    the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance. Things like L-
    carnitine, L- glutamine, Coenzyme Q10 and the likes.
    Care to share your real experience here?

    Thanks in advance.
    Davy
     
  9. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > > Davykoh wrote:
    > >> Hi there,
    > >> Besides solid training, vitamins and the illegal stuffs, I would like to
    > >> find out what are
    > >> the 'sure fire' supplements that really enhances performance. Things like
    > >> L-
    > >> carnitine, L- glutamine, Coenzyme Q10 and the likes.
    > >> Care to share your real experience here?
    > >>

    > >
    > > Some old european dinosaur named Eddy Merckx used to recommend "Ride
    > > Lots". I'm not sure if it's still available in the US.

    >
    > Not to mention Pot Belge...
    >


    That was never proven, was it?

    .......and, of course, Lance was as pure as the driven snow, right?
     
  10. bryanska

    bryanska Guest

    >Care to share your real experience here?

    Dimethyltriptamine. Like being shot out of an atomic cannon.
     
  11. rms

    rms Guest

    My question is, how to prevent muscle cramping in the latter half of a
    marathon run. Are there minerals or somesuch that would alleviate this.

    rms
     
  12. Pat Lamb

    Pat Lamb Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:
    > Oh, I forgot! Highly recommended is:
    >
    > 3,7-Dihydro-3,7-dimethyle-1H-prine-2,6-dione, more popularly known as
    > Theobromine.
    >
    >
    >
    > See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/w.html


    Hot or cold? Liquid or solid? Milk or dark?

    BTW, some years ago I had a "chocolate calendar" that had a description
    of carob. One month's entry started off with, "Carob is a bean that,
    some say," and listed a bunch of processing steps. It concluded with,
    "can be made to taste like chocolate. The same can be said of dirt." I
    saved that for a few years, but then lost it. Did anybody else see that
    one? Does anybody have the full wording?

    Pat
     
  13. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Inject testosterone. Remember, folks, testosterone is testosterone.
    > It is a specific molecule, and it's the same for all animal species.
    > You can buy it at the animal supply store, intended for injection into
    > stallions so they can cover more mares. Just do an IM injection every
    > day, a couple of hours before your ride. Ask your family doctor about
    > the correct dose. If your doctor disapproves, tell him he's a pussy
    > and find a different doctor. Believe me, you'll feel like you're
    > flying, in more ways than one!!!
    >

    Great for men, but a woman with ultra high testosterone.
    He would be checking to see where she had a 'pair'.
    Bill
     
  14. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Davykoh wrote:
    > SNIP
    >
    > Dave -- eat less processed food and more vegetables. Especially green
    > leafy ones (like spinach), cruciferous ones (broccoli, cabbage,
    > cauliflower) and whatever's in season (tastier and less expensive).


    Lots of macro nutrients but to calories for those carb heavy climbs.
    As
    > for macronutrients (carbohydrates/proteins/fats) please consult with a
    > credentialed, trained Registered Dietician (not a "Nutritionist" or the
    > clerk at the health food store) as to amount and proportion, but I
    > betcha if you reduce (that's right, eat less of them!) your overall
    > macronutient inputs, you'll gain in performance as you lose weight off
    > the frame. Your frame, that is. However, I've found that I've had to
    > change my riding style after executing this tip myself: When I dropped
    > 60 pounds I found that while climbing the steeper local hills I had to
    > go from standing up and mashing the pedals to spinning, or at least a
    > faster cadance. I'd lost torque....


    Don't you mash up on potatoes and high calorie stuff when you ride?
    You may be running a calorie deficit and not know it.
    I don't mean baked or mashed potatoes on the plate but baked in the
    microwave then cooled down to munch as you ride. No added salt or fat
    and lots of complex carbs.
    >
    > DIRTY LITTLE SECRET THE DIET DOCTORS DON'T TELL YOU: The medical
    > specialty that includes metabolism in the job description is
    > endocrinology. As much as anyone, endocrinologists know off the cuff,
    > to the extent of our knowledge, how food gets from inside the gut to
    > inside your cells. Here's the nasty part: ASIDE from Doctor Bernstein,
    > who is up front in describing his diet as one especially designed for
    > very sick people , there is NO famous diet named after an endo.
    > Cardiologists, holisticians, dermatologists, yeah, but no endos. THEY'D
    > be dancing in the streets if we all just ate less.


    My dirty little secret trick. I would carry a bottle of pancake syrup
    with me and chug some once in a while, pure liquid sugar energy.
    >
    >
    > As for MICRONUTRIENTS, well, if you are eating more vegetables you'll
    > be getting more of hwat you need. Otherwise, any standard multivitamin
    > should fill in most of the remaining gaps. Same money for a new jersey
    > and buy the pharmacy or grocery store's own brand. You're going to need
    > the new jersey when you lose weight.
    >
    > But dont't take my word for it: Get your HMO to pay for a consultation
    > with a Registered Dietician, and learn all sorts of portion control and
    > measuration tricks! HINT: Just becuase the rubber rice bounces higher
    > than the rubber apple doesn't mean you should bounce either one.
    >
    >
    > Robert Leone [email protected]
    >

    All of the above sounds great for day to day eating but on a long ride,
    especially a century you need calories^2, and don't need to worry about
    the nutrients until after the event. I hate to say it but even
    McDonald's type food would be good on a long trip due to the calories.
    OK, McDonalds might be a stretch, but you get the point.
    Bill
     
  15. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    bryanska wrote:
    >>Care to share your real experience here?

    >
    >
    > Dimethyltriptamine. Like being shot out of an atomic cannon.
    >

    I just looked it up and it seems to be illegal.
    Bill
     
  16. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    Pat Lamb wrote:
    > Claire Petersky wrote:
    >
    >>Oh, I forgot! Highly recommended is:
    >>
    >>3,7-Dihydro-3,7-dimethyle-1H-prine-2,6-dione, more popularly known as
    >>Theobromine.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/w.html

    >
    >
    > Hot or cold? Liquid or solid? Milk or dark?
    >
    > BTW, some years ago I had a "chocolate calendar" that had a description
    > of carob. One month's entry started off with, "Carob is a bean that,
    > some say," and listed a bunch of processing steps. It concluded with,
    > "can be made to taste like chocolate. The same can be said of dirt." I
    > saved that for a few years, but then lost it. Did anybody else see that
    > one? Does anybody have the full wording?
    >
    > Pat


    Carob is supposed to be better than chocolate for some nutritional
    reasons that escape me now, but I have read that on the boxes with carob
    in them. Maybe just lower fat content? I am definitely not an expert on
    that subject. Chocolate is also promoted as a feel good food and I am an
    addict to anything chocolate, even carob.
    I don't know if it would help biking or not.
    Bill
     
  17. Jim Smith

    Jim Smith Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Oh, I forgot! Highly recommended is:
    >
    > 3,7-Dihydro-3,7-dimethyle-1H-prine-2,6-dione, more popularly known as
    > Theobromine.
    >
    >
    >
    > See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/w.html
    >


    I think you meant:

    3,7-Dihydro-3,7-dimethyle-1H-purine-2,6-dion

    The typo is on Sheldon's page too.
     
  18. Bill Baka wrote:
    SNIP
    > Don't you mash up on potatoes and high calorie stuff when you ride?
    > You may be running a calorie deficit and not know it.
    > I don't mean baked or mashed potatoes on the plate but baked in the
    > microwave then cooled down to munch as you ride. No added salt or fat
    > and lots of complex carbs.


    Nah. I microdose on minature stone-ground wheat crackers, have peanut
    butter and no jelly sandwiches with whole multigrain bread and/or small
    apples for the riding nosh. Lots of lovely phytochemicals that are
    SUPPOSED to be good for you in the skin of nice red apples -- and the
    fructose in the apple gets into the bloodstream slower than the simple
    long-chain starches in the crackers (or so I've been told). My riding
    cohorts did get a little dismayed about my eating raw red bell pepper
    strips while in the saddle this one time -- they thought I was biting
    my tongue off or something.


    SNIP
    >
    > My dirty little secret trick. I would carry a bottle of pancake syrup
    > with me and chug some once in a while, pure liquid sugar energy.
    > >


    I'd say you're nuts, except it is cheaper than the specially packaged
    for "athletes" gel pouches. You might want to price glucose tablets
    next time you're at the pharmacy, but on a price per gram of
    carbohydrate basis the syrup might still come out ahead. Orange juice
    is a field expedient/non-commental "snack" anti-hypoglycemic of choice
    for some of the stealthier (as in you can be watching them and you'd
    never know they just checked their blood sugar and adjusted their
    insulin pump for a pre-meal bolus) Type 1 diabetic patients I've met --
    the accepted wisdom is OJ is quicker than chocolate bars because fats
    and goodness knows what else in the bars can retard absorbtion of sugar
    into the bloodstream. Others like a more solid option that won't get
    them in trouble with the "Drug Zero-Tolerance Police" -- raisins
    ("grape sugar" is an old name for glucose). It's a lot harder to
    justify confiscating a couple small boxes of raisins than it is to
    justify seizing an elementary school student's glucose tablets.
    SNIP
    > >
    > > Robert Leone [email protected]
    > >

    > All of the above sounds great for day to day eating but on a long ride,
    > especially a century you need calories^2, and don't need to worry about
    > the nutrients until after the event. I hate to say it but even
    > McDonald's type food would be good on a long trip due to the calories.
    > OK, McDonalds might be a stretch, but you get the point.
    > Bill



    Everyone's got their own favorite food preference and individual
    metabolism. I could go quite a way on a handlebar bag (and rack trunk)
    of fresh fruit, berries, etc. Then there's Kent "Not a Nutritional Role
    Model" Peterson. The original poster was asking about (sarcasm volume
    knob turned to "11") secret mystery/underground herbal supplemental
    pills to be megadosed on the royal road to Category 2 racing mastery
    (sarcasm volume knob turned to "0").

    And, of course, I forgot to advise him to keep a food diary to show his
    dietary advisors....

    Robert Leone [email protected]
     
  19. Dane Buson

    Dane Buson Guest

    rms <[email protected]> wrote:
    > My question is, how to prevent muscle cramping in the latter half of a
    > marathon run. Are there minerals or somesuch that would alleviate this.


    You can try getting more potassium (banana's or salt replacement). Some
    people advocate more magnesium. Some people say hydrate more, some say
    you need more salt.

    Sometimes these will help, sometimes they won't. The *most* likely
    reason you're cramping up is that you aren't conditioned enough.
    If you're talking about running though, shouldn't you posting in a
    running newsgroup? It's pretty slow around here at the moment though,
    so I can't say *I* really mind.

    ObBike: The Schwalbe Marathon Pluses ride much better when I inflate
    them near the limit. Too much RR when they were a little lower.

    --
    Dane Buson - [email protected]
    "veni, vedi, nuclei deceiri - I came, I saw, I core dumped"
     
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