Sure Jell secrets?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by The Bubbo, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    I made another batch of jam this weekend, this time with Sure Jell pectin
    since the last batch never set. I followed the proportions correctly and the
    resultant jam, while good was just too sweet. The sweetness overwhelmed the
    cherry flavor.

    It was a cherry ginger jam.

    They say in the instructions to not use less sugar, but I'm wondering if
    anyone (barb?) knows if there is a threshold, a level that you could actually
    go down to so that it isn't so sweet.

    Thanks


    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
    Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
     
    Tags:


  2. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    The Bubbo wrote:

    > I made another batch of jam this weekend, this time with Sure Jell pectin
    > since the last batch never set. I followed the proportions correctly and the
    > resultant jam, while good was just too sweet. The sweetness overwhelmed the
    > cherry flavor.
    >
    > It was a cherry ginger jam.
    >
    > They say in the instructions to not use less sugar, but I'm wondering if
    > anyone (barb?) knows if there is a threshold, a level that you could actually
    > go down to so that it isn't so sweet.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >


    You could use a pectin meant for low sugar instead of the regular.
    Bernardin's is called Light but Sure Jell should have something similar.
     
  3. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    ~patches~ wrote:
    > The Bubbo wrote:
    >
    >> I made another batch of jam this weekend, this time with Sure Jell pectin
    >> since the last batch never set. I followed the proportions correctly and

    the
    >> resultant jam, while good was just too sweet. The sweetness overwhelmed the
    >> cherry flavor.
    >>
    >> It was a cherry ginger jam.
    >>
    >> They say in the instructions to not use less sugar, but I'm wondering if
    >> anyone (barb?) knows if there is a threshold, a level that you could

    actually
    >> go down to so that it isn't so sweet.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>

    >
    > You could use a pectin meant for low sugar instead of the regular.
    > Bernardin's is called Light but Sure Jell should have something similar.


    oh yeah, that was my other question. The Sure Jell for low or no sugar calls
    for splenda. Can I use real sugar instead of spleanda and just use that
    smaller amount of sugar.

    I guess I don't really understand the chemistry of jam making very well. I
    have a vague idea of needing pectin (either in powder form or naturally
    occuring) to thicken things, but I don't know about liquid ratios, sugar
    content or anything like that.

    and of course I'm nesting big time here so all I want to do is make jam, bake,
    make homemade cheese, make jam, bake, cook cook cook cook cook.

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
    Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I made another batch of jam this weekend, this time with Sure Jell pectin
    > since the last batch never set. I followed the proportions correctly and the
    > resultant jam, while good was just too sweet. The sweetness overwhelmed the
    > cherry flavor.
    >
    > It was a cherry ginger jam.
    >
    > They say in the instructions to not use less sugar, but I'm wondering if
    > anyone (barb?) knows if there is a threshold, a level that you could actually
    > go down to so that it isn't so sweet.
    >
    > Thanks


    Are you using tart cherries? Dole freezes cherries but they're sweet
    cherries. The ones I get in Door County are sour. I don't mess with
    the instructions (much, anyway). Try using the Sure Jell for
    Reduced-Sugar Recipes product. Or look for (co-op most likely to
    succeed and I don't know about this time of year) Pomona's Universal
    Pectin, or Ball brand Fruit Jell for low- or no-sugar recipes.

    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  5. Yappa

    Yappa Guest

    I don't like the taste of artificial pectins. They taste chemically to
    me and I always think: What's the point of making homemade jam if it
    tastes more chemically than store-bought? Also, I don't like really
    sweet jams. So I use tart fruit, less sugar than recipes call for, and
    cook the fruit longer. With fleshy fruits like peaches I bake the jam
    like an apple butter. It always tastes great. Sometimes it's a bit
    soupier than store-bought jam but not so soupy that it falls off the
    bread. :)

    I think the way to get a good-textured jam with no artificial pectin is
    to make sure the fruit has enough natural pectin and to make sure you
    have enough acid. High pectin fruits are apples, crab apples, quinces,
    red currants, gooseberries, grapes, plums and cranberries. Low pectin
    fruits are strawberries, blueberries, peaches, apricots, cherries,
    pears, raspberries, blackberries and pineapple. Underripe fruit has
    more pectin than ripe fruit, so you can add a quarter or so underripe
    fruit to your mix, or add some high-pectin fruit in with your low
    pectin fruit. (Mixed fruit always seems to taste best anyway.) For
    acid, add some lemon juice. Cooking longer supposedly kills pectin but
    I don't have any problems with it. I never follow a recipe but I do
    tend to taste and then monkey around with the ingredients while it's
    cooking.

    While I'm discrediting myself as a jam-maker, I'll also add that I
    hardly ever bother with proper canning lids or parafin or any of that
    stuff anymore. I sterilize my jars and fill them carefully, but then I
    just keep them in the fridge till I eat them all.

    Yappa
    http://yappadingding.blogspot.com/
     
  6. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    The Bubbo wrote:

    > ~patches~ wrote:
    >
    >>The Bubbo wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I made another batch of jam this weekend, this time with Sure Jell pectin
    >>>since the last batch never set. I followed the proportions correctly and

    >
    > the
    >
    >>>resultant jam, while good was just too sweet. The sweetness overwhelmed the
    >>>cherry flavor.
    >>>
    >>>It was a cherry ginger jam.
    >>>
    >>>They say in the instructions to not use less sugar, but I'm wondering if
    >>>anyone (barb?) knows if there is a threshold, a level that you could

    >
    > actually
    >
    >>>go down to so that it isn't so sweet.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>You could use a pectin meant for low sugar instead of the regular.
    >>Bernardin's is called Light but Sure Jell should have something similar.

    >
    >
    > oh yeah, that was my other question. The Sure Jell for low or no sugar calls
    > for splenda. Can I use real sugar instead of spleanda and just use that
    > smaller amount of sugar.
    >
    > I guess I don't really understand the chemistry of jam making very well. I
    > have a vague idea of needing pectin (either in powder form or naturally
    > occuring) to thicken things, but I don't know about liquid ratios, sugar
    > content or anything like that.
    >
    > and of course I'm nesting big time here so all I want to do is make jam, bake,
    > make homemade cheese, make jam, bake, cook cook cook cook cook.
    >


    Ok, I'm just going by the no sugar needed Bernardin Pectin but yes -
    ultra light instructions uses no added sweeteners, very light uses
    granular artificial sweetener, and light uses sugar. Mind you I have
    not used Sure Jell so don't know if their light Pectin does the same but
    I suspect so. Is there a website on the box that you could check?
     
  7. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Yappa wrote:

    > I don't like the taste of artificial pectins. They taste chemically to
    > me and I always think: What's the point of making homemade jam if it
    > tastes more chemically than store-bought? Also, I don't like really
    > sweet jams. So I use tart fruit, less sugar than recipes call for, and
    > cook the fruit longer. With fleshy fruits like peaches I bake the jam
    > like an apple butter. It always tastes great. Sometimes it's a bit
    > soupier than store-bought jam but not so soupy that it falls off the
    > bread. :)


    I do a lot of canning including making jams and jellies. Most of my
    jams and jellies are made with alternative sweeteners like maple syrup
    instead of sugar. I haven't noticed the chemical taste but you can make
    your own pectin from apples or better yet quinces. The instructions are
    online on several websites and I know I had one site specifically
    bookmarked somewhere.

    >
    > I think the way to get a good-textured jam with no artificial pectin is
    > to make sure the fruit has enough natural pectin and to make sure you
    > have enough acid. High pectin fruits are apples, crab apples, quinces,
    > red currants, gooseberries, grapes, plums and cranberries. Low pectin
    > fruits are strawberries, blueberries, peaches, apricots, cherries,
    > pears, raspberries, blackberries and pineapple. Underripe fruit has
    > more pectin than ripe fruit, so you can add a quarter or so underripe
    > fruit to your mix, or add some high-pectin fruit in with your low
    > pectin fruit. (Mixed fruit always seems to taste best anyway.) For
    > acid, add some lemon juice. Cooking longer supposedly kills pectin but
    > I don't have any problems with it. I never follow a recipe but I do
    > tend to taste and then monkey around with the ingredients while it's
    > cooking.


    There are a lot of recipes for cooked jams using no pectin. Basically
    they are long cook until reduced to the desired consistency.

    >
    > While I'm discrediting myself as a jam-maker, I'll also add that I
    > hardly ever bother with proper canning lids or parafin or any of that
    > stuff anymore. I sterilize my jars and fill them carefully, but then I
    > just keep them in the fridge till I eat them all.


    Yes that is poor advice. Obviously you don't make much in the way of
    jam. One load of jam for me would be 7 X 500 ml jars. I would never
    have the fridge space to do a load and keep it all in the fridge until I
    used it considering the amount of canning I do. I would recommend
    anyone canning anything follow the proper canning guidelines as per USDA
    or Health Canada.

    >
    > Yappa
    > http://yappadingding.blogspot.com/
    >
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Yappa" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't like the taste of artificial pectins.


    > Yappa
    > http://yappadingding.blogspot.com/


    Artificial pectin? SureJell, Certo, Fruit Jell, are mostly made from
    citrus; occasionally apple. Usually dextrose is added to prevent caking.
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I guess I don't really understand the chemistry of jam making very well. I
    > have a vague idea of needing pectin (either in powder form or naturally
    > occuring) to thicken things, but I don't know about liquid ratios, sugar
    > content or anything like that.


    rec.food.preserving.
    http://www.gbronline.com/jacke/rfpfaq/rfpFAQ.htm is the FAQ file
    www.uga.edu/nchfp
    rec.food.preserving
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  10. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    "Yappa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]roups.com...
    > I don't like the taste of artificial pectins. They taste chemically to
    > me and I always think: What's the point of making homemade jam if it
    > tastes more chemically than store-bought? Also, I don't like really
    > sweet jams. So I use tart fruit, less sugar than recipes call for, and
    > cook the fruit longer. With fleshy fruits like peaches I bake the jam
    > like an apple butter. It always tastes great. Sometimes it's a bit
    > soupier than store-bought jam but not so soupy that it falls off the
    > bread. :)
    >
    > I think the way to get a good-textured jam with no artificial pectin is
    > to make sure the fruit has enough natural pectin and to make sure you
    > have enough acid. High pectin fruits are apples, crab apples, quinces,
    > red currants, gooseberries, grapes, plums and cranberries. Low pectin
    > fruits are strawberries, blueberries, peaches, apricots, cherries,
    > pears, raspberries, blackberries and pineapple. Underripe fruit has
    > more pectin than ripe fruit, so you can add a quarter or so underripe
    > fruit to your mix, or add some high-pectin fruit in with your low
    > pectin fruit. (Mixed fruit always seems to taste best anyway.) For
    > acid, add some lemon juice. Cooking longer supposedly kills pectin but
    > I don't have any problems with it. I never follow a recipe but I do
    > tend to taste and then monkey around with the ingredients while it's
    > cooking.
    >
    > While I'm discrediting myself as a jam-maker, I'll also add that I
    > hardly ever bother with proper canning lids or parafin or any of that
    > stuff anymore. I sterilize my jars and fill them carefully, but then I
    > just keep them in the fridge till I eat them all.
    >
    >

    You're exactly right about the pectin, and I do jam in the fridge the same
    way . Often, all you need to do is use lemon juice for pectin. Last time I
    made Pineapple Jam I think I used 2 T. lemon juice for a 28 oz. can of
    fruit. It might work with cherries.

    Maybe the Sur Jell needs the extra sugar to conceal its taste? Or this: An
    older Food Science textbook says the standards for identity for jams and
    jellies is "no less than 45 parts of fruit to 55 parts of sweetener by
    weight". Or maybe they are playing it safe to cover their ass in case some
    fool makes botulism. --I always go with equal parts on down according to the
    tartness of the fruit. Add the lemon juice and cook it to the thermometer.

    About those peaches you bake -- if you cook them down and get a recipe for
    one of the thick fruit butters, you'll think you died and went to heaven.

    Lefty

    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful



    >
     
  11. On Mon 27 Mar 2006 09:34:36p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Lefty?

    > "Yappa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I don't like the taste of artificial pectins. They taste chemically to
    >> me and I always think: What's the point of making homemade jam if it
    >> tastes more chemically than store-bought? Also, I don't like really
    >> sweet jams. So I use tart fruit, less sugar than recipes call for, and
    >> cook the fruit longer. With fleshy fruits like peaches I bake the jam
    >> like an apple butter. It always tastes great. Sometimes it's a bit
    >> soupier than store-bought jam but not so soupy that it falls off the
    >> bread. :)
    >>
    >> I think the way to get a good-textured jam with no artificial pectin is
    >> to make sure the fruit has enough natural pectin and to make sure you
    >> have enough acid. High pectin fruits are apples, crab apples, quinces,
    >> red currants, gooseberries, grapes, plums and cranberries. Low pectin
    >> fruits are strawberries, blueberries, peaches, apricots, cherries,
    >> pears, raspberries, blackberries and pineapple. Underripe fruit has
    >> more pectin than ripe fruit, so you can add a quarter or so underripe
    >> fruit to your mix, or add some high-pectin fruit in with your low
    >> pectin fruit. (Mixed fruit always seems to taste best anyway.) For
    >> acid, add some lemon juice. Cooking longer supposedly kills pectin but
    >> I don't have any problems with it. I never follow a recipe but I do
    >> tend to taste and then monkey around with the ingredients while it's
    >> cooking.
    >>
    >> While I'm discrediting myself as a jam-maker, I'll also add that I
    >> hardly ever bother with proper canning lids or parafin or any of that
    >> stuff anymore. I sterilize my jars and fill them carefully, but then I
    >> just keep them in the fridge till I eat them all.
    >>
    >>

    > You're exactly right about the pectin, and I do jam in the fridge the
    > same way . Often, all you need to do is use lemon juice for pectin.
    > Last time I made Pineapple Jam I think I used 2 T. lemon juice for a 28
    > oz. can of fruit. It might work with cherries.
    >
    > Maybe the Sur Jell needs the extra sugar to conceal its taste? Or this:
    > An older Food Science textbook says the standards for identity for jams
    > and jellies is "no less than 45 parts of fruit to 55 parts of sweetener
    > by weight". Or maybe they are playing it safe to cover their ass in case
    > some fool makes botulism. --I always go with equal parts on down
    > according to the tartness of the fruit. Add the lemon juice and cook it
    > to the thermometer.
    >
    > About those peaches you bake -- if you cook them down and get a recipe
    > for one of the thick fruit butters, you'll think you died and went to
    > heaven.


    I have used Sure Jell exactly twice of all the times I've made jam. I
    really prefer using the older methods as you describe. I think both the
    texture and flavor are superior. I can't speak for jelly, as I don't make
    it. I've never cared for jelly.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You're exactly right about the pectin, and I do jam in the fridge the same
    > way . Often, all you need to do is use lemon juice for pectin.


    Lemon juice is acid, not pectin, and it is not a substitute for pectin.
    The set of fruit to become jam is dependent on what Brian Mailman, on
    rec.food.preserving (where this conversation belongs and where I've set
    the follow up for this), calls "a friendly handshake" between sugar,
    pectin, and acid. A good jam has the right combination of all three --
    plus the fruit.
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Maybe the Sur Jell needs the extra sugar to conceal its taste? Or this: An
    > older Food Science textbook says the standards for identity for jams and
    > jellies is "no less than 45 parts of fruit to 55 parts of sweetener by
    > weight". Or maybe they are playing it safe to cover their ass in case some
    > fool makes botulism.


    You don't get botulism from fruit jam, or jelly, or preserves.
    Botulism poisoning CAN be a result of improperly processed low-acid
    comestibles (flesh, vegetables, combinations thereof).

    rec.food.preserving has a good FAQ file available.
    http://www.jaclu.com/rfpFAQ/rfpFAQ.htm
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  14. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I guess I don't really understand the chemistry of jam making very well. I
    >> have a vague idea of needing pectin (either in powder form or naturally
    >> occuring) to thicken things, but I don't know about liquid ratios, sugar
    >> content or anything like that.

    >
    > rec.food.preserving.
    > http://www.gbronline.com/jacke/rfpfaq/rfpFAQ.htm is the FAQ file
    > www.uga.edu/nchfp
    > rec.food.preserving



    thank you!
    this is what I need
    you're a total peach

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
    Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
     
  15. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    >
    > I have used Sure Jell exactly twice of all the times I've made jam. I
    > really prefer using the older methods as you describe. I think both the
    > texture and flavor are superior. I can't speak for jelly, as I don't make
    > it. I've never cared for jelly.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    > _____________________


    There's something about jelly -- that makes one screw one's face up - and
    say the words, "Jelly - Yelly - Yuk!"
    The wors(t) for me is apple jelly -- oh, my -- just awful! It could be the
    consistency, I don't know, because I don't like jello either.
    Dee Dee
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:
    (snip)
    > > rec.food.preserving


    > you're a total peach


    Wanna see my tattoo?

    rec.food.preserving is where this stuff belongs.
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
  17. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > (snip)
    >
    >>>rec.food.preserving

    >
    >
    >>you're a total peach

    >
    >
    > Wanna see my tattoo?
    >
    > rec.food.preserving is where this stuff belongs.


    I don't see why it can't be discussed here. A small batch of jam could
    yield only enough for a few days eating so not really preserving. The
    newer breadmakers have a jam setting as well meant for fresh eating not
    preserving. IINM pectin is used in the breadmaker recipes as well as
    some jams meant for short term storage in the fridge. Both involve
    cooking and food.
     
  18. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > (snip)
    >> > rec.food.preserving

    >
    >> you're a total peach

    >
    > Wanna see my tattoo?
    >
    > rec.food.preserving is where this stuff belongs.


    i bet you make that offer to all the girls. You tart!

    I feel too completely inexperienced to go to rfp! They'll call me a newb and
    mock me til the moon falls on my head. Sigh.

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
    Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
     
  19. Reg

    Reg Guest

    The Bubbo wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> The Bubbo <oyo[email protected]> wrote:
    >>(snip)
    >>
    >>>>rec.food.preserving

    >>
    >>>you're a total peach

    >>
    >>Wanna see my tattoo?
    >>
    >>rec.food.preserving is where this stuff belongs.

    >
    >
    > i bet you make that offer to all the girls. You tart!
    >
    > I feel too completely inexperienced to go to rfp! They'll call me a newb and
    > mock me til the moon falls on my head. Sigh.
    >


    rfp is a good resource. Nice folks there, and a lot of knowledge
    and experience. I learn from it all the time.

    --
    Reg
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > The Bubbo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > (snip)
    > >> > rec.food.preserving

    > >
    > >> you're a total peach

    > >
    > > Wanna see my tattoo?
    > >
    > > rec.food.preserving is where this stuff belongs.

    >
    > i bet you make that offer to all the girls. You tart!


    Usually guys. I had a couple guys at Hooter's almost off their
    barstools last weekend. <grin>
    >
    > I feel too completely inexperienced to go to rfp! They'll call me a newb and
    > mock me til the moon falls on my head. Sigh.


    No we won't. You won't be the first newcomer and you, hopefully, won't
    be the last. And we know what we're talking about, besides. "-)
    --
    -Barb
    <http://jamlady.eboard.com> Updated 3-27-2006 It Can Can!

    "If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
     
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