surviving prolonged stress...

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by M Dunne, Jan 31, 2006.

  1. M Dunne

    M Dunne Guest

    Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job /
    money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried and
    with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    weeks?

    I'm in just such a state at the moment, and I'd like to know what it's going
    to be doing to me.

    Also: can anyone suggest what I ought to do to my supplement intake to help
    minimise these effects....? Lots of B vitamins? More antioxidants?

    Will vigorous exercise be a help?

    Thanks for all info!

    Marcus
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    "M Dunne" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    > are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job /
    > money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried and
    > with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    > weeks?
    >
    > I'm in just such a state at the moment, and I'd like to know what it's going
    > to be doing to me.
    >
    > Also: can anyone suggest what I ought to do to my supplement intake to help
    > minimise these effects....? Lots of B vitamins? More antioxidants?
    >
    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?
    >
    > Thanks for all info!
    >
    > Marcus
    >
    >


    Heavy weight lifting.

    Or,

    Vodka.

    ;-)

    And get some damned sleep!
    Sub-lingual Melatonin has helped me a lot.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  3. IanW

    IanW Guest

    long-term stress probably caused my chronic fatigue syndrome but it took a
    good few years. stress depletes lots of vitamins and minerals, but one thing
    I think gets overlooked is amino acids. that is, part of the function of the
    endocrine system is that it takes protein stored in the body and breaks it
    down into amino acids. overstimulation of the endocrine system may result in
    your body facing a shortage of amino acids too. therefore, if you're going
    to supplement, apart from the general mutlivit/mineral (one that emphasises
    on B vitamins), you might want to consider an amino acid supplement.
    other than that, one thing I was taking (am trying other supplements at the
    moment but will probably go back to that) that I felt helped build up my
    stress resistance was Rhodiola Rosea:
    http://www.solgar.co.uk/modules/shop/view.asp?catid=28&Prodcode=E4139&qty=20457


    "M Dunne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    > are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job
    > / money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried
    > and with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    > weeks?
    >
    > I'm in just such a state at the moment, and I'd like to know what it's
    > going to be doing to me.
    >
    > Also: can anyone suggest what I ought to do to my supplement intake to
    > help minimise these effects....? Lots of B vitamins? More antioxidants?
    >
    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?
    >
    > Thanks for all info!
    >
    > Marcus
    >
     
  4. M Dunne wrote:
    > Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    > are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job /
    > money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried and
    > with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    > weeks?


    In the worst case scenario, excess will rot your brain.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12893096
    "Stress promotes adaptation ("allostasis"), but a perturbed diurnal
    rhythm or failed shutoff of mediators after stress ("allostatic state")
    leads, over time, to wear and tear on the body ("allostatic load").
    Neural changes mirror the pattern seen in the cardiovascular,
    metabolic, and immune systems, that is, short-term adaptation versus
    long-term damage. Allostatic load leads to impaired immunity,
    atherosclerosis, obesity, bone demineralization, and atrophy of nerve
    cells in brain. Allostatic load is seen in major depressive illness and
    may also be expressed in other chronic anxiety disorders such as PTSD
    and should be documented."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10202566

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15576059
    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?


    yes
    --
    john gohde
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com
     
  5. M Dunne wrote:
    > Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    > are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job /
    > money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried and
    > with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    > weeks?


    In the worst case scenario, excess stress will rot your brain.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=12893096
    "Stress promotes adaptation ("allostasis"), but a perturbed diurnal
    rhythm or failed shutoff of mediators after stress ("allostatic state")
    leads, over time, to wear and tear on the body ("allostatic load").
    Neural changes mirror the pattern seen in the cardiovascular,
    metabolic, and immune systems, that is, short-term adaptation versus
    long-term damage. Allostatic load leads to impaired immunity,
    atherosclerosis, obesity, bone demineralization, and atrophy of nerve
    cells in brain. Allostatic load is seen in major depressive illness and
    may also be expressed in other chronic anxiety disorders such as PTSD
    and should be documented."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=10202566

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15576059
    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?


    yes
    --
    john gohde
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com
     
  6. TC

    TC Guest

    It will deplete you of important vitamins and eventually you will
    suffer from anxiety/depression and your immune system will be
    compromised. You will be more susceptible to infectious disease.

    Two B vitamin stress complex each morning with food (for anxiety). 1000
    mg vitamin C three to four times a day (anxiety and immune system). Cod
    liver oil would be a good idea (anxiety and immune syatem). Eat
    properly and at appropriate times thruout the day. Avoid junk foods,
    especially with added sugars. Eat real foods like real chicken soup and
    real bone broth soups. Try to get enough sleep and rest. Walk or get
    out and get some exercise and fresh air. Cut out caffenated products.
    Drink enough of water.

    This will help you cope with the stress and keep you healthy enough to
    handle things and get you thru the day.

    TC

    M Dunne wrote:
    > Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    > are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job /
    > money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried and
    > with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    > weeks?
    >
    > I'm in just such a state at the moment, and I'd like to know what it's going
    > to be doing to me.
    >
    > Also: can anyone suggest what I ought to do to my supplement intake to help
    > minimise these effects....? Lots of B vitamins? More antioxidants?
    >
    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?
    >
    > Thanks for all info!
    >
    > Marcus
     
  7. SDer

    SDer Guest

    "IanW" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > long-term stress probably caused my chronic fatigue syndrome but it
    > took a good few years. stress depletes lots of vitamins and minerals,
    > but one thing I think gets overlooked is amino acids. that is, part of
    > the function of the endocrine system is that it takes protein stored
    > in the body and breaks it down into amino acids. overstimulation of
    > the endocrine system may result in your body facing a shortage of
    > amino acids too. therefore, if you're going to supplement, apart from
    > the general mutlivit/mineral (one that emphasises on B vitamins), you
    > might want to consider an amino acid supplement. other than that, one
    > thing I was taking (am trying other supplements at the moment but will
    > probably go back to that) that I felt helped build up my stress
    > resistance was Rhodiola Rosea:
    > http://www.solgar.co.uk/modules/shop/view.asp?catid=28&Prodcode=E4139&q
    > ty=20457
    >


    I have to agree with all these points. CFS is unfortunately where prolonged
    stress ends. Vitamins, antioxidants, whey protein and adaptogenics like
    Rhodiola are highly recommended.
     
  8. SDer wrote:

    > I have to agree with all these points. CFS is unfortunately where prolonged
    > stress ends. Vitamins, antioxidants, whey protein and adaptogenics like
    > Rhodiola are highly recommended.


    Well, I certainly do NOT.

    CFS certainly is not the end result of stress. If anything the end
    result of chronic stress is chronic anxiety and/or depression.

    You are dreaming if you think that popping vitamin pills is going to
    solve the stress problem.

    The mind-body connection is the modern way of dealing with modern
    stress.

    History
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/tutorials/history-mind-body-connection.html
    In the history file, you will see the prominent historical figures
    involved in the treatment of stress.

    And, here is a general web page on the subject.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/resilience/mind-body-connection.html

    Beyond exercise, the Wellness Movement offers many constructive
    approaches to treating stress.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/gnu-dictionary/Wellness.html

    Treating stress with vitamin B, etc. ranks at the very bottom of the
    list of effective treatments, IMHO.
    --
    john gohde
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com
     
  9. IanW

    IanW Guest

    "Mr-Natural-Health" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > SDer wrote:
    >
    >> I have to agree with all these points. CFS is unfortunately where
    >> prolonged
    >> stress ends. Vitamins, antioxidants, whey protein and adaptogenics like
    >> Rhodiola are highly recommended.

    >
    > Well, I certainly do NOT.
    >
    > CFS certainly is not the end result of stress.


    That depends on how literally you take that statement. CFS seems to be
    caused by different things for different people but *for some* it is stress
    that is the main trigger.. For me it came on after a really intense 12
    months of emotional stress. Of course, the condition itself is a very
    physical problem - it's like stretching an elastic band - you can stretch it
    a myriad of times and it will return to it's proper shape but if you stretch
    it too far and it breaks then it will require more than just sorting out the
    stress to fix it. In my case my mitochondria don't generate energy as there
    appears to be some blockage getting ATP in and out of the cells.

    > If anything the end
    > result of chronic stress is chronic anxiety and/or depression.
    >
    > You are dreaming if you think that popping vitamin pills is going to
    > solve the stress problem.


    no-one suggested that it would - getting rid of the source of the stress
    would be better, but supplements do help deal with some of the physical
    depletions associated with it.

    Ian
     
  10. Kofi

    Kofi Guest

    I'll skip what's been mentioned.

    Stress elevates cortisol (which can impair memory). It affects the
    sleep cycle via orexin neurons. It enhances your appetite for sugar and
    fat.

    All nice things when a lion is trying to knaw on your leg. Bad when
    chronic. You can actually run out of cortisol and suffer "adrenal
    exhaustion."

    Some helpful things:

    Meditation.

    No alcohol.

    Low glycemic index/ketogenic diet/calorie restriction/intermittent
    fasting or other dietary intervention

    beta-endorphin agonists (e.g., DHEA - though OD'ing on it will cause
    anxiety; sex; exercise)

    nitric oxide releasers (hot bath, arginine + folate, estrogen, green tea)

    SSRIs
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    Kofi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > beta-endorphin agonists (e.g., DHEA - though OD'ing on it will cause
    > anxiety)


    Been there, done that. ;-)
    It's awful.......

    Fortunately, I realized what I'd done and stopped it.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  12. M Dunne

    M Dunne Guest

    My thanks to IanW, SDer, and Kofi for their advice! Much appreciated,
    people!!

    :)

    Marcus
     
  13. IanW

    IanW Guest

    "IanW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > In my case my mitochondria don't generate energy as there appears to be
    > some blockage getting ATP in and out of the cells.


    I meant "dont generate enough energy" there!
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    "IanW" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "IanW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > In my case my mitochondria don't generate energy as there appears to be
    > > some blockage getting ATP in and out of the cells.

    >
    > I meant "dont generate enough energy" there!
    >
    >
    >


    Short circuit the mitochondria...

    DNP.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. SDer

    SDer Guest

    Kofi <[email protected]> wrote in news:kofi-C5F16A.09550801022006
    @news.east.earthlink.net:

    > I'll skip what's been mentioned.
    >
    > Stress elevates cortisol (which can impair memory). It affects the
    > sleep cycle via orexin neurons. It enhances your appetite for sugar

    and
    > fat.
    >
    > All nice things when a lion is trying to knaw on your leg. Bad when
    > chronic. You can actually run out of cortisol and suffer "adrenal
    > exhaustion."
    >
    > Some helpful things:
    >
    > Meditation.
    >
    > No alcohol.
    >
    > Low glycemic index/ketogenic diet/calorie restriction/intermittent
    > fasting or other dietary intervention
    >


    Indeed, eliminating sugar and alcohol helps a lot. However, I believe a
    small glass of red wine with dinner can be beneficial and calming.


    > beta-endorphin agonists (e.g., DHEA - though OD'ing on it will cause
    > anxiety; sex; exercise)
    >
    > nitric oxide releasers (hot bath, arginine + folate, estrogen, green

    tea)

    Are you sure about arginine? I have read it can have a bad effect on CFS,
    though I have not been able to find solid evidence for it or against it.

    >
    > SSRIs
     
  16. "M Dunne" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Can I ask the good people hereabouts if they can please tell a newbie what
    > are the major bad effects of a period of prolonged stress and anxiety (job /
    > money / debt / home, etc) of the kind that has one permanently worried and
    > with a high heart rate, unable to sleep, etc, over a period of several
    > weeks?
    >
    > I'm in just such a state at the moment, and I'd like to know what it's going
    > to be doing to me.
    >
    > Also: can anyone suggest what I ought to do to my supplement intake to help
    > minimise these effects....? Lots of B vitamins? More antioxidants?
    >
    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?
    >
    > Thanks for all info!
    >
    > Marcus


    http://www.newscientist.com/channel/sex/mg18925365.500
     
  17. SDer

    SDer Guest

    "M Dunne" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    gui.ntli.net:

    > Will vigorous exercise be a help?


    BTW, vigorous exercise till exhaustion doesn't sound a good idea. Mild
    exercise within sensible limits, on the other hand, is a good idea.
     
  18. M Dunne

    M Dunne Guest

  19. Del Cecchi

    Del Cecchi Guest

    "IanW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "IanW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >> In my case my mitochondria don't generate energy as there appears to
    >> be some blockage getting ATP in and out of the cells.

    >
    > I meant "dont generate enough energy" there!
    >
    >

    How does one measure the amount of ATP getting in and out of the cells,
    and the amount of energy being generated by the mitochondria?
    >
     
  20. There are significant biological changes that take place in the body in
    times of stress. And extended periods of stress can cause destructive
    changes in the body such as depression and a suppressed immune system,
    which can lead to heart disease, cancer, and stroke. So if you are
    feeling stressed out, its time to get some relief.

    Stress is all around us. It's an inevitable and normal part of our
    daily lives
    The body is flooded with stress hormones, making the heart pump faster,
    the breathing rate increase, and the muscles tense up. This is the
    body's way of gearing up for imminent physical activity.

    There are various stress management techniques that can reduce the
    effects that stress takes on your life. The most important thing you
    can do to prevent stress from negatively affecting you is to learn how
    to recognize stress and the triggers that set you off. Also, avoiding
    substances such as alcohol, drugs, and nicotine will help the body
    remain better prepared to handle stress.

    For getting more information about the Stress relief u can visit this
    site:
    http://www.medical-health-care-information.com/health-living/stress/index.asp
     
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