Suspend or not? Plus trike q's.

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Ian, Jun 30, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I have been riding a rear suspension only Challenge Wizard for a couple of years, but due to an old
    knee injury am switching to a trike, I already have a non suspension Kett Weizel and find with the
    mesh seat that this is more comfortable than the 2 wheeler even though I then had a rear shock. I
    plan on going for a tadpole trike, what are peoples thoughts on suspension on trikes?

    Also it may be my imagination, and it may only be here in the U.K. but it seems that the general
    reaction to a recumbent trike is better than a recumbent bike, on the Wizard I got mixed responses
    from pedestrians, from very positive right through to very negative, however since switching to the
    trike I have experienced no negativity, at church on Sunday morning in fact I was giving rides to
    all and sundry.

    I am planning to start selling trikes as a business, I used to work as a cycle engineer years
    ago and do all my own servicing, repairs etc... as well as a lot of other peoples, I think the
    resistance to adult trikes is more or less non existant in the U.K., how are they viewed in
    the U.S.A.?

    Ian
     
    Tags:


  2. Having NO suspension on a Tadpole is a waste of a Tadpole, your frame won't ssurvive the abuse from
    the roads and Rail Trails.

    As for how well are trikes (tadpoles) being received in North America...dunno, I ride in Toronto and
    no one seems to notice I am riding just above their knees.
    --------------------------------------
    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB26229F.7DC1%[email protected]...
    > I have been riding a rear suspension only Challenge Wizard for a couple of years, but due to an
    > old knee injury am switching to a trike, I already
    have
    > a non suspension Kett Weizel and find with the mesh seat that this is more comfortable than the 2
    > wheeler even though I then had a rear shock. I plan on going for a tadpole trike, what are peoples
    > thoughts on
    suspension
    > on trikes?
    >
    > Also it may be my imagination, and it may only be here in the U.K. but it seems that the general
    > reaction to a recumbent trike is better than a recumbent bike, on the Wizard I got mixed responses
    > from pedestrians, from very positive right through to very negative, however since switching to
    the
    > trike I have experienced no negativity, at church on Sunday morning in
    fact
    > I was giving rides to all and sundry.
    >
    > I am planning to start selling trikes as a business, I used to work as a cycle engineer years ago
    > and do all my own servicing, repairs etc... as
    well
    > as a lot of other peoples, I think the resistance to adult trikes is more
    or
    > less non existant in the U.K., how are they viewed in the U.S.A.?
    >
    > Ian
     
  3. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote in news:BB26229F.7DC1%[email protected]:

    > I have been riding a rear suspension only Challenge Wizard for a

    Rear suspension gets my vote. There are very few tadpole trikes with front suspension, for several
    good reasons. Response to my trikes has been good overall. Tadpoles don't appear to suffer from the
    geriatric stigma deltas might. In the U.S.A. , DF performance trikes never really caught on. When I
    mention trikes without mine present, the image called up appears to be the "retired Aunt Gladys in
    Florida" type of trike.

    Recumbent folk (so far) seem very willing to entertain thoughts about recumbent trikes.

    > I am planning to start selling trikes as a business, I used to work as a cycle engineer years
    > ago and do all my own servicing, repairs etc... as well as a lot of other peoples, I think the
    > resistance to adult trikes is more or less non existant in the U.K., how are they viewed in
    > the U.S.A.?
    >

    I do wish you the best in your endeavor.

    rorschandt http://pictures.care2.com/view/1/174801833
    >

    --
    <A HREF="mailto:p[email protected][127.0.0.1]"
     
  4. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Ian wrote:
    >
    > I have been riding a rear suspension only Challenge Wizard for a couple of years, but due to an
    > old knee injury am switching to a trike, I already have a non suspension Kett Weizel and find with
    > the mesh seat that this is more comfortable than the 2 wheeler even though I then had a rear
    > shock. I plan on going for a tadpole trike, what are peoples thoughts on suspension on trikes?
    >
    > Also it may be my imagination, and it may only be here in the U.K. but it seems that the general
    > reaction to a recumbent trike is better than a recumbent bike, on the Wizard I got mixed responses
    > from pedestrians, from very positive right through to very negative, however since switching to
    > the trike I have experienced no negativity, at church on Sunday morning in fact I was giving rides
    > to all and sundry.
    >
    > I am planning to start selling trikes as a business, I used to work as a cycle engineer years
    > ago and do all my own servicing, repairs etc... as well as a lot of other peoples, I think the
    > resistance to adult trikes is more or less non existant in the U.K., how are they viewed in
    > the U.S.A.?

    My Sunset and Dragonflyer have identical seats, approximately the same seat recline, the same
    drivewheel size, and fat rear tires with similar inflation pressures. Bumps that lift me off the
    seat on the Sunset are hardly worth noticing on the Dragonflyer.

    In addition, I can mash a big gear uphill with no noticeable suspension pogo on the Dragonflyer
    despite its simple design (just a spring with no shock absorber). I believe that this is due to the
    use of a step-up jackshaft on the same axis as the suspension pivot. [1]

    If I were building a trike, it would have a step-up jackshaft and rear suspension.

    [1] The step-up also allows for wider range gearing and small chainrings, since it increases the
    effective rear wheel size for gearing purposes.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities Red Sunset and Blue Dragonflyer :)
     
  5. Skip

    Skip Guest

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB26229F.7DC1%[email protected]... <snip>
    > Also it may be my imagination, and it may only be here in the U.K. but it seems that the general
    > reaction to a recumbent trike is better than a recumbent bike, on the Wizard I got mixed responses
    > from pedestrians, from very positive right through to very negative, however since switching to
    the
    > trike I have experienced no negativity, at church on Sunday morning in
    fact
    > I was giving rides to all and sundry.
    >
    A recumbent trike looks a lot like a tricycle, but a recumbent bike doesn't look so much like
    a bicycle to the eye of the non-involved. Could that explain the more favorable reaction
    which I suspect is the case? People have a preference for looking at things that visually
    make sense to them.

    skip
     
  6. Ian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BB26229F.7DC1%[email protected]>...
    > I have been riding a rear suspension only Challenge Wizard for a couple of years, but due to an
    > old knee injury am switching to a trike, I already have a non suspension Kett Weizel and find with
    > the mesh seat that this is more comfortable than the 2 wheeler even though I then had a rear
    > shock. I plan on going for a tadpole trike, what are peoples thoughts on suspension on trikes?

    I have both suspension /non on two trikes. One goes like a little jackrabbit, but the mesh seat is
    pretty comfy on a non-suspended trike.

    My other is a bit more of a cruiser. Pretty heavy (Stainless Steel frame & shock) but not quite as
    sharp turning so overall smooth ride. Like a massive old Lincoln or Cadillac in a Corvette or
    Mustang world!
    >
    > Also it may be my imagination, and it may only be here in the U.K. but it seems that the general
    > reaction to a recumbent trike is better than a recumbent bike, on the Wizard I got mixed responses
    > from pedestrians, from very positive right through to very negative, however since switching to
    > the trike I have experienced no negativity, at church on Sunday morning in fact I was giving rides
    > to all and sundry.
    >
    People frankly don't know what to say about my partially faired trike! So far; all positive
    reaction, and I constantly spot cameras aimed at
    me. Just wave, smile, and hope they got my good side. ;-)

    > I am planning to start selling trikes as a business, I used to work as a cycle engineer years
    > ago and do all my own servicing, repairs etc... as well as a lot of other peoples, I think the
    > resistance to adult trikes is more or less non existant in the U.K., how are they viewed in
    > the U.S.A.?
    >
    > Ian

    I considered making a business of "importing" WizWheel, Catrike, S&B, and other trikes made in the
    U.S. and Canada. The overhead would be no problem, time, tools, interest, etc.., etc., etc. But the
    rent or lease would eat up my savings in one year. No way for me!! Best of luck with your business
    plans! No problem- I can afford 4 trikes now!

    Chris Jordan Santa Cruz, CA.
     
  7. "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB26229F.7DC1%[email protected]...
    > I have been riding a rear suspension only Challenge Wizard for a couple of years, but due to an
    > old knee injury am switching to a trike, I already
    have
    > a non suspension Kett Weizel and find with the mesh seat that this is more comfortable than the 2
    > wheeler even though I then had a rear shock. I plan on going for a tadpole trike, what are peoples
    > thoughts on
    suspension
    > on trikes?

    I ride a Greenspeed GTO (non-suspended tadpole), and IMO it's not usable on gravel roads. The
    occasional pothole on a paved road is acceptable, but the corduroy or gravel roads just shake my
    eyeteeth out and rattle them together with my eyeballs in my brain case.

    For the time being, I'm sticking with the GTO and the paved roads, but my next trike will be
    suspended. If I built my own, I would suspend at least the rear, and I would design a clamp that
    would (optionally) disable the suspension. (I hereby place that terrific idea in the public domain.)

    Too, I'd look hard at some way to get traction on gravel. I've had to walk the GTO up many hills.
    Anti-squat in the rear, especially in the lower (bigger rear) gears would improve it. Based on a
    casual inspection of photographs of trike rear suspensions, I have the suspicion that builders err
    on the wrong side when they go for 'anti-bob' suspension geometries.

    HTH, Fred Klingener
     
  8. Fred Klingener <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Too, I'd look hard at some way to get traction on gravel. I've had to walk the GTO up many hills.
    : Anti-squat in the rear, especially in the lower (bigger rear) gears would improve it. Based on a
    : casual inspection of photographs of trike rear suspensions, I have the suspicion that builders err
    : on the wrong side when they go for 'anti-bob' suspension geometries.

    Hmm can a trike slide backwards on gravel slopes? :p

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  9. Christopher Jordan <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I considered making a business of "importing" WizWheel, Catrike, S&B, and other trikes made in the
    : U.S. and Canada. The overhead would be no problem, time, tools, interest, etc.., etc., etc. But
    : the rent or lease would eat up my savings in one year. No way for me!! Best

    How about selling/showcasing only in trade shows? And if somebody wants a test ride - you can drive
    to him! Service huh? :)

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  10. Joshua Goldberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Having NO suspension on a Tadpole is a waste of a Tadpole, your frame won't ssurvive the abuse
    : from the roads and Rail Trails.

    Are tadpoles very fragile because of their geometry then? I'd guess frames on bicycles (upstraight
    and bent) often last decades and hundreds of thousands of kilos.

    What kind of roads do you ride? :)

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  11. The mean streets of downtown Toronto. Streets that had their entire repair and resurfacing budget
    for 5 years diverted to a fat bloated grossly inefficient Public Transit system. As of now the
    Transit Authority has ripped up 5 miles of street to replace streetcar tracks. This idiot move has
    shifted all the cyclists onto an already car crowded street with another street car line down the
    middle of it.

    In a 2 week period I toasted one right front axle and both front hubs. In Toronto there are 1
    million cyclists using the streets daily alongside very frustrated car and truck drivers. I have
    spoken to dozens of car owners who have had their suspension systems torn out by the roads
    cyclists also ride on. In my area of Toronto there are 24 bicycle repair shops charging on average
    $30.00 per hour and they are backlogged several weeks for road damage related repairs to MTBs.
    These are MTBs designed to survive jumping logs and mounting rocks on trails...yet they are being
    wrecked on Toronto streets. It is almost a running joke in Toronto re: did you hear about the
    Pothole that ate the car. I have seen Potholes that in Florida they call Sinkholes. Holes you ride
    into on a bent and dissappear below the road surface....I suspect soon homeless families will be
    living in these Potholes.

    Funny as hell, one street I ride on has a designated Bicycle lane and last week all the way down
    that street one wheel was missing from the painting of the bike on the pavement. I see this as an
    Omen and the message is move out of Toronto...or at least get out of the city core. I hear the burbs
    ain't so bad except out there people drive like idiots because there are so few cops around to nail
    them. You need suspension in Toronto to survive and lately even suspension isn't enough. One of my
    relatives is the Mayor of Toronto and he won't ride a bicycle in the city he rules. Luckily he is
    retiring and the woman most feel will replace him IS an avid cyclist. Hopefully she will get the
    roads fixed before anymore cyclists have to die.
    ********************
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Joshua Goldberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : Having NO suspension on a Tadpole is a waste of a Tadpole, your frame
    won't
    > : ssurvive the abuse from the roads and Rail Trails.
    >
    > Are tadpoles very fragile because of their geometry then? I'd guess frames on bicycles (upstraight
    > and bent) often last decades and hundreds of thousands of kilos.
    >
    > What kind of roads do you ride? :)
    >
    > --
    > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  12. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > Joshua Goldberg <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : Having NO suspension on a Tadpole is a waste of a Tadpole, your frame won't ssurvive the abuse
    > : from the roads and Rail Trails.
    >
    > Are tadpoles very fragile because of their geometry then? I'd guess frames on bicycles (upstraight
    > and bent) often last decades and hundreds of thousands of kilos....

    The loadings on bicycle frames transmitted through the wheels are primarily vertical. On a trike,
    significant torsion forces are transmitted through the frame.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  13. [email protected] wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Hmm can a trike slide backwards on gravel slopes? :p

    Depends on the slope, I guess. Something I found out on my first tadpole (S&B) with a motor- on
    gravel I could break traction, hit the Currie motor full throttle, turn hard right or hard left,
    pedal like crazy and do little donuts!

    Not answering your question, but trikes can slide!!!

    (I am so glad that I am over 50; so I can blame my foolish riding on my 2nd childhood)

    Chris Jordan Santa Cruz, CA.
     
  14. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    "Fred Klingener" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<_8jMa.7344$P%[email protected]>...
    >
    > I ride a Greenspeed GTO (non-suspended tadpole), and IMO it's not usable on gravel roads. The
    > occasional pothole on a paved road is acceptable, but the corduroy or gravel roads just shake my
    > eyeteeth out and rattle them together with my eyeballs in my brain case.
    >
    > For the time being, I'm sticking with the GTO and the paved roads, but my next trike will be
    > suspended.

    Fred,

    I mostly agree with you that my GTO is not great on a bumpy dirt road or rail-trail. But, most of my
    riding is on roads, some winter damaged. The GTO is just fine there. I would probably not opt for
    the cost of suspension.

    In selling a trike, I would say that suspension is an option that might sell but not to everyone.

    Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt Lake City
     
  15. Vol

    Vol Guest

    People of all ages seem to enjoy my TerraTrike. Many ask about the supply, price, and habits.

    George

    > I think the resistance to adult trikes is more or less non existant in the U.K., how are they
    > viewed in the U.S.A.?
    >
    >Ian
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...