Suspension Seat Posts on Road Bikes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by KellyT, Oct 28, 2006.

  1. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

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    The 'roads' I cycle on are really bad here. So a while back I decided to try a suspension seat post on one of my racing bikes. It works brilliantly well. The harsh aluminium frame ride becomes really quite plush and much, much more comfortable.

    Has anyone else ever succumbed to comfort on their racing bike? The idea seems to be fairly heavily 'sneered at', but if you don't like bruised bottoms, it actually works really well in practice. Just fashion, or is there a genuine reason for never seeing suspension posts on a racing style bike?
     
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  2. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    Racing bikes we mortals love to use get their inspiration from racing bikes pros and bike athletes use. And equipment fashion is dictated by the racing scene. Except for Paris-Roubaix and some paves, most racing is done on well paved roads and therefore technical developement in the 'sprunged' seatpost department remain dormant to say the least. However, where race bike seating comfort is concerned, the development really is focused on the saddle (not on the post) - from the material used for cover to prenium/prostate cuts within the saddle to carbon rails or rails with elastomer ends so on and so forth.
     
  3. carbonguru

    carbonguru New Member

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    I agree with HD, so many developments with Saddles while seatposts remain somewhat stuck in a design engineering rut. The industry has adopted the 'heck if its not broke, don't fix it mentality'. Personally, on my MTB, I could use a suuspension seatpost. Now you have me curious. :rolleyes:



     
  4. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    I would venture that on a road bike a suspension seatpoint could actually your ride LESS comfortable. Stick with me class. The proper height of your saddle (as well as fore and aft position) are crucial to comfort. You need to keep your butt firmly planted with no rocking whatsoever to achieve maximum comfort. By design, the suspension seatpost will fluctuate your height. Thus, it may be fine for a comfort bike, a mtb or even a recreational road bike, it would not be appropriate for a serious race biker. As previously noted, the saddle is where the high tech work has been done to maximize comfort.
     
  5. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

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    Theoretically I know that your point may be correct. But I have actually gone with it in practice and it just isn't so. If you are riding across heavily repaired / rutted pavement then your saddle being at the optimal height is of scant consequence when every 10 yards or so, it's being kicked through your teeth, and therefore (as a consequence) your posterior has stopped being at the correct height anyway! (The saddle's where it should be, but it's just propelled your rear into the air above it.)
     
  6. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

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    like this one

    Go ahead and put one on. It won't give you much travel but it would dampen some crap roads. Rockshox make one too. I'm curious, give it a shot. (And it only weighs 304g)
     
  7. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    If you get a suspension seatpost which is sprung heavily enough, then it will remain at the correct height unless and until you hit a big bump.

    Kind of like the way a suspension fork does not hurt your pedaling. It stays at the top if its travel until you need it.

    I used an inexpensive "Promax" suspension seatpost on an older Schwinn 12 speed and it hardly moved unless you hit something big.
     
  8. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I have a Rockshox Road Zero Offset Suspension Seatpost on the Tri bike.

    Felt Racing supplied a similar post for the SR81.

    Thess are foam dampened, not spring, and take the buzz out of the coarser bitumen roads. Great for older riders, particularly if you can't afford carbon rear stays. ;)
     
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